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Bob Blarney

an easy-to-set high-precision table saw fence.

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Hello, here's a link to an easy-to-set high precision fence that I made for my cabinet saw.  I think the concept may be adapted to smaller saws, and done with a less complicated locking scheme.

 

It employs parallel (identical) wedge with a 1:4 pitch.  Thus, a 1/32nd inch displacement fore/aft results in a port-starboard displacement of 1/128th of and inch.  The wedges were made from clear pine, with blue aluminum t-track screwed to the edges.   For ease of adjustment, It could be fitted with a linear scale graduated in inches, mm, or fractional inches, or a digital instrument could be used as well.

 

Note: the camera view is from the side of the saw, with the front of the table to the right in the view.

 

https://youtu.be/vXyb3p7TNcY

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The fence that is shown in the video is built to be very sturdy because as workpieces get bigger, so do the loads on the equipment.  That is not the case for  modeling.

 

So I'm trying to create a miniature version for you (and me) with a much simpler design for the lock mechanism,  such that a modeler could make one with tools and material they may have on hand --- a layout ruler (the small Incra-rule), a table saw, a Dremel, and a drill.   Of course, a sturdy workbench with workholding features (a vise, clamps, dogholes, etc.) is a given. 

 

If you have suggestions with respect to capacity, overall length, or resolution, please post them below.

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Bob,

The super peachy keen aspect of the video loop was the digital readout.  If only there was a way to get that for the Byrnes saw....  the physical scratches on the micrometer defeat my eyes.

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16 minutes ago, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

you mean something like this, as much accurate but without all the unnecessary

IMG_3222.jpg

That looks like a fine well-made tool.  What is the range of adjustment? I had something similar in mind.  Is this a Byrnes product, and what's the cost?

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Jaager said:

Bob,

The super peachy keen aspect of the video loop was the digital readout.  If only there was a way to get that for the Byrnes saw....  the physical scratches on the micrometer defeat my eyes.

Jaager,

 

Generally  I'm a fan of Wixey digital measuring devices, but that particular device isn't one of my favorites.  It was just at hand when I made the video.  There are miter slot mounts for digital calipers that are easier to use. At this writing, I'm busy with a domestic job for Management, making new kitchen drawers and cabinets for her.  The fence allows me to make quick and repetitive sawing adjustments by just laying down masking tape and then making index marks for dadoing the lock joints for the drawers.  It's also excellent for fitting tenons - bumping a fence back & forth by a few thousandths is tedious.

Edited by Bob Blarney

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12 hours ago, Bob Blarney said:

Is this a Byrnes product, and what's the cost?

Around 30 years ago, Dremel had a table saw, The fence was not very much effective. Somebody came with  this kind of T square fence. It is a very simple tool to mill... the most difficult part is to find  a steel  sheet the same thickness as the blade to make the groove for the millimeter adjustment.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Gregory said:

For what it is worth

The best fence  for an:  an easy-to-set high-precision table saw fence would be to set

the Accuriser instead of the plain fence.  It is much faster to use than a micrometer and it is as much precise.

 

The way it works: first you set the fence close to the desired width,

then you micro adjust with the diagonal fence.

 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

Around 30 years ago, Dremel had a table saw, The fence was not very much effective. Somebody came with  this kind of T square fence. It is a very simple tool to mill... the most difficult part is to find  a steel  sheet the same thickness as the blade to make the groove for the millimeter adjustment.

 

 

Use a thinner blade, cut the groove, determine the error, and then paste paper or precision metal shims to the fence and cut again as necessary.  So far as the desired measurement system goes (inches, mm, or furlongs), I would use digital calipers to make adjustments and forget about making a scale for the fence. 

 

Edited by Bob Blarney

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4 hours ago, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

The best fence  for an:  an easy-to-set high-precision table saw fence would be to set

the Accuriser instead of the plain fence.  It is much faster to use than a micrometer and it is as much precise.

 

The way it works: first you set the fence close to the desired width,

then you micro adjust with the diagonal fence.

 

Exactly so, as mine works also.  It is possible to increase the resolution of adjustments by lengthening the taper of the wedges, but limitations arise about the overall working length of the contraption.  I settled on a 1:4 ratio as an acceptable compromise between resolution and overall size.  As is, it's quite possible to make adjustments down to 1/256th of inch. 

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