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Which wood filler do you use after planking? Most of wood fillers are white (or very light), so what do you do for the darker wood, like mahogany?

Please share the experience. I planned to use HobbyLite, but this item is ending soon. What are the other options?

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Elmers has a series of wood filler that comes in a tube.  They have a wide range of color choices and its water based.  I found that if you buy all the colors it is easy to mix them like paints and get pretty close.  In addition...if you have some weathering powders, you can add small amounts to color it further if needed.

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15 hours ago, Chuck said:

Elmers has a series of wood filler that comes in a tube.  They have a wide range of color choices and its water based.  I found that if you buy all the colors it is easy to mix them like paints and get pretty close.  In addition...if you have some weathering powders, you can add small amounts to color it further if needed.

The Elmer's wood filler that I've seen doesn't seem strong enough. I wish to correct the shape slightly, so i plan to put several layers of the filler and sand appropriately. The color is a lower priority issue.

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Posted (edited)

I have the Elmer’s that is purple and dries white, seems pretty strong.  There is also a wood filler by bondo and the product that has the muscle man on it is real strong (it is a powder you mix with water)...can’t think of the name 

Edited by Duanelaker

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3 hours ago, Duanelaker said:

I have the Elmer’s that is purple and dries white, seems pretty strong.  There is also a wood filler by bondo and the product that has the muscle man on it is real strong (it is a powder you mix with water)...can’t think of the name 

This must be the Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty: it was recommented in another topic. The description looks good, but it mostly used for furniture and other large wooden items: I'm a little worried if it is as good for fine tuning of a ship model.

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I have used a mixture of epoxy and microballons. It has many advantages: When cured it is very easy to sand and light. And you can make it as solid as you want, from a youghurt like into almost solid only adding more microballons into mixture. Also you can prepare the amount you need without the need of buying a full tube which always hardens when not in use. Normally it is white but it can be colored with any pigments just mixed into it.

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1 hour ago, vaddoc said:

After trying lots of fillers, I also now use Elmers colour changing filler. Dries quickly, sands nicely. Lovely staff.

Is that important that it is colour changing? Is it better than other Elmer's fillers coloured with oak/mahogany/etc.?

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Not really, it just shows when it is dry to sand. I ve succesfully mixed Elmers with acrylic paint. I suspect the purple, essentially colourless filler, can be mixed with wood dust for a near perfect colour match but this I have not tried this yet.

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1 hour ago, vaddoc said:

Not really, it just shows when it is dry to sand. I ve succesfully mixed Elmers with acrylic paint. I suspect the purple, essentially colourless filler, can be mixed with wood dust for a near perfect colour match but this I have not tried this yet.

I had a similar idea of mixing white filler with acrylic paint, but I'm afraid that this paste would be extremely marky.

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As I have posted before, my favorite is Durham’s Rock Hard Water Putty.  (I have no connection with the company.). It is a light tan powder, that you mix with water to the desired consistency.  It dries quickly, seems to bond with most everything and sands easily to a feather edge.  It is also foolproof.  It hardens regardless of how thick or thin it is mixed.  I buy it at our local big box home improvement store.

 

Roger

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On 1/4/2020 at 11:32 AM, dkuzminov said:

I wish to correct the shape slightly, so i plan to put several layers of the filler and sand appropriately

An efficient way would be to scab on pieces of wood veneer and sand it to shape.

A question that I have from time to time = If it is a first layer of planking on a POB built and the gaps being filled are between planks, Why even use a filler?  The real planking will cover the gaps.  If there is a significant hollow,  the molds being too widely spaced, scabbing wood there would provide a more secure surface for the real planks.

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I guess I'm a rebel or an idiot.  I use sawdust of the type wood that need filling, and mix of Elmer's white and sawdust.  I go for more sawdust than glue and use fresh glue as it hasn't thickened up.   

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10 hours ago, mtaylor said:

I guess I'm a rebel or an idiot.  I use sawdust of the type wood that need filling, and mix of Elmer's white and sawdust.  I go for more sawdust than glue and use fresh glue as it hasn't thickened up.   

This is very similar to what is done with some historic artifacts as well.   Nothing matches better.  

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