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Martigana by Javier Barón - FINISHED - 1:210 - traditional mediterranean boat S. XIX


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The martigana (or marticana, martingana, etc.) was, in the times of the sail, a common vessel and quite widespread in the waters of the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic, although today its name has been almost completely forgotten. This denomination appears  only from the second half of the 1700s and only a few decades ago some of them were still seen sailing through Tuscany, and even today a couple of them have been photographed afloat in Sicilian waters.

 

This vessel was used for the transport of goods, even over long distances. The martigana of s.XIX, which is the one that reproduces the model, was a boat with a bow of very pronounced curvature that ended in a spur of the type used in the galleys, with the wedge stern and the rather rounded master frame. In fact, the martigana was, as far as the hull is concerned, quite similar to the tartana, differing from it basically in the sailplan, which was in those of square sails in the main mast and not with the lateen rig that carried the latter .

 

It seems that the origin of this vessel is in Provence, in the village of Martigues, located west of Marseille, on the southern shore of the great Barre lagoon, along the narrow channel that joins the lagoon with the sea, which It was famous as one of the places in the Mediterranean where the best tartanas were built, so that the term martigana was originally an adjective: "martigana tartana" or of  Martigues.

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Javier, este es otro maravilloso barco modelo en miniatura que has construido. Eres un maestro artesano de estas hermosas embarcaciones y barcos pequeños. Me encantan las pequeñas embarcaciones de trabajo del Mediterráneo. Muchas gracias por continuar para mostrarnos su trabajo.

 

This is another wonderful, miniature model boat that you have built. You are a master craftsman of these beautiful, small boats and ships. I love the small, working boats of the Mediterranean. Thank you so much for contiuing to show us your work.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Este es un barco maravilloso. Me encanta cómo que también has puesto cada una de tus hermosos embarcaciones en miniatura en una vitrina. ¡Tienes una colección fantasiosa!

 

This is a wonderful boat. I love how you have put each of your beautiful, miniature boats in a display case too. You have a fantastic collection!

 

Cordial saludo,

Bob

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15 hours ago, KeithAug said:

She is a pretty little vessel Javier. The sails are nicely shaped - what are they made from?

Sails making:

I cut bias strips of fabric of the desired width to mimic the strips that make up the sails in reality.

I glue the strips with textile glue, with minimal overlap between them.

I cut the sails to the size and shape that is needed for the model, I make the curl girdles with a thin strip of cloth that sticks in its position on the sails. If the sail has reinforcements in the corners, I hit them before the hems.

With strips of fabric of a minimum thickness I make the hems, which then stick on the edges of the trimmed sail (on both sides). I glue a thread on the contour of the sail to make the bowline, leaving a loop in the corners to make the clue ropes. Finally, I put the curls in the number and position required in the corresponding positions of the curl girdles.

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4 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

Absolutely beautiful work, Javier. Your wonderful, tiny models are always an inspiration.

 

But I am interested in why you chose a scale of 1:210 rather than, say, 1:200.:)

 

Steven

Because of my anarchic way of proceeding, in which the scale is the result of wanting the model's hull to be between 10 and 11 cm. in length ... it is unorthodox, I know.

Really, we can say that the model is in 1: 200 scale instead of 1: 210, because what I am reproducing is not a real ship in particular, but a type of vessel, with all the margins of variation that are usual.

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