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HMS Speedy by Delf - Vanguard Models - Scale 1:64 - Master Shipwright edition


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58 minutes ago, glbarlow said:

Don’t be gone long Derek, you may find we’re using your log to discuss the merits of fine scotch

 

That's OK by me - I've just finished a very fine Lagavulin 🥃 🤪

 

1 hour ago, SpyGlass said:

could I suggest you could even pause for a minute after sanding and try the effect of a bit of stain varnish or wax before you copper

 

Good suggestion - I might well do that. I generally prefer the beauty of wood, but on the other hand I've not coppered a hull and may decide to give it a go regardless. I won't rush into a decision. Another malt or two first, I think.

 

Derek

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23 hours ago, SpyGlass said:

As to scotch - I dont care what brand it is as long as its with Schweppes dry ginger. 

Dry ginger with good single malt? Sacrilege! I might join you in a Newky Brown though.

 

22 hours ago, glbarlow said:

Macallan for me. I visited the distillery in Scotland

I love the Islay malts but haven't visited the island. My favourite distillery was Highland Park in the Orkneys. My wife and I were the only visitors but we still got the full tour. 

 

22 minutes ago, PhillH said:

Has anyone coppered just one side?

Interesting idea Phil. I might wait for some other brave soul to try it!

 

Derek

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I've had a good go at initial sanding. I still need to thin down the area where the stern post will fit, but otherwise I'm quite pleased with the result so far. Edge bending went well. There is some variation in the wood colours, but that won't be as noticeable when the wale is painted and the hull coppered below the waterline (I think I've decided to go down that route). In the following pictures I've applied some sanding sealer as a reveal coat, in other words to show up any areas needing further sanding. 

 

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The run of the strakes may offend purists - especially in the lower hull area just behind the bows - but that will be covered by plating and for me the pleasing thing is how flat all the planks are laying. Having said that, I'm keen to try the edge bending technique in conjunction with properly marking out the frames. For example as Chuck has done with the Winchelsea group build.

 

I'm glad this part of the build is nearing completion - I'm relieved I've not made a total hash of the hull - and I'm looking forward to the next stage.

 

I must say it's great to follow along with other people's logs now that there are several of us in the Speedy club, and I'm looking forward to seeing SpyGlass catching up now that he's got his accommodation sorted.

 

Derek

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Edited by DelF
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Looks very nice. I had never tried edge bending before but made the planking job so much easier.

 

I was not too bothered about the standard of the planking once I got below the waterline, but actually I was pleased with my end result.

Edited by glennard2523
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1 hour ago, glbarlow said:

 

I'm not sure what "purists" would be bothered by, I think it looks great.  Nice job!

 

Thanks! Much appreciated. I just thought the line of some of the strakes looked a bit odd. 
 

Derek

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Bit more progress today, in between gardening chores - brief spell of warm sunny weather here, so I'm making the most of it. 

 

Removing the frame tops was surprisingly easy. The MDF broke off well - you just need to go steady to make sure you don't damage the gunport pattern, which is only 0.8mm thick. Gentle twisting with pliers is all that's needed:

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Chris's instructions suggest using a file or sandpaper to clean up, but I found a new Swann Morton craft blade sliced through the remaining MDF and glue very neatly:

 

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Next, I painted the areas inside the bow and stern that'll be difficult to do once the deck's in place. Speaking of which, I couldn't resist test fitting the laser etched deck:

 

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Some unhelpful shadows here - I thought the deck actually looked pretty good. As a further test, I cut some boxwood planks and dry-laid them with a light pencil line to simulate caulking:

 

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I'm still in two minds. If the boxwood was properly varnished it would look stunning. However Chris's design will be hard to follow, as the deck planks are tapered towards the bow and stern and are shown joggled into the margin plank. Do I stick with the laser deck, which I think is acceptable, or go for a stunning boxwood version and risk making a mess of it? I don't think I'd be satisfied doing a 'plain' boxwood deck - ie without the tapering etc. . Even though the finish would look great I'd miss the detail in the laser-etched version.

 

What do you guys think?

 

Derek

 

 

 

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I think the 2nd edition of the laser etched deck looks nicer than the first (from forum pictures at least). I purchased a etched deck for my Alert and I think it looks really nice. If you are at all considering the laser etched deck I would consider contacting Chris and seeing if you can purchase a second edition. You can see the differences here:

 

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Thanks everyone for your comments and advice. You all seem to be coming down in favour of the laser etched deck, and in particular version two.

 

I think I'll take your advice and forego the pleasure (?) of making a fully accurate boxwood deck on this occasion. Another time, perhaps. However I'm not sure which version of the laser etched deck I prefer. I get the point about the clutter around the hatches and other openings in version 1, but won't a lot of that be covered by coamings and the like? On the other hand, the trunnels stand out a lot on version 2 and they will be visible regardless. 

13 hours ago, glbarlow said:

If you go with boxwood I don’t think you have to do all the detail around the masts and hatches. If you don’t go with the boxwood then send it to me, because I can’t seem to find any😂

Glenn, for me it would be tapering the planks and getting the joggling right that would put me off. As for boxwood, I cheat and use the castello variety. It may not be quite the same as English boxwood but it still works well and gives a good finish. I get it in 3' x 4" sheets in a variety of thicknesses from 3mm to 10mm and mill my own timber for planks, spars etc. I'll drop some off next time I'm in Texas :rolleyes:.  For really fine work, such as block making, I buy old boxwood folding rulers and they're guaranteed well-seasoned!

 

Derek

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In the end I decided to go for a paper deck on which I'll draw my own planks.

 

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No, seriously, I've gone for version 1 :rolleyes: . Here I'm protecting it with paper and masking tape whilst starting to plank the inner bulwarks. With some relief I've gone back to using PVA, hence the number of clamps.

 

Derek

 

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Just a query Derek - which PVA are you using - I have just been surprised by the fast grab of the present standard Evostick Interior Wood Glue compared to the version of it was using a year or so back. Thinking of trying exterior version which is supposed to be slower.

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Hi SpyGlass

 

Here's the one I use. I call it PVA but technically it's an aliphatic resin - chemically similar to PVA but stronger and sandable.

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It's described as fast grab, but don't let that put you off - there is plenty of time to position your work. It's fast in the sense that you should have a decent join in less than 30 minutes, although as with all glues of this type I leave critical joints such as frames overnight. 

 

I believe aliphatic resin is sometimes known as yellow glue, but mine looks white to me. I got it years ago - from memory at a model boat show - use it all the time and I've still got half left. The manufacturer is UK based Starloc Adhesives - here's their retail website shop-4-glue.com. You'll see they do a range of glues and applicators.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Derek

 

 

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I use Super Phatic glue by Deluxe materials (50ml) which comes with its own plastic applicator tube for accurate positioning of the glue. This glue is a thin, non-fuming cyano alternative which dries in 10 -20 minutes (or quicker with finger pressure) It has a low odour, with water clean up. It penetrates much further than other glues. Waterproof when dry. Some of the many uses: Pin & glue balsa & hardwood. Bonds plastic hinges.

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You guys havent appreciated how SLOW I am - 30 mins is a flash at my speeds !

I will try the Evostik Exterior which is supposed to be slower .

But forewarned etc..

Also it took me much longer to do the joins because I tried to do too many at a time and I wasnt working with a syringe to apply the glue - that is so much faster - and neater!

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Work is progressing well now second planking is done (apart from above the wales).

 

Trimming the planks level with the tops of the bulwarks was straightforward. Unlike other colleagues in the Speedy club I didn't trim the planks round each port as I came to it, preferring to lay all the planks in one go then trim the ports after the glue had dried. I had to use off-cuts from 2nd planking the hull, otherwise I would have run out of strips,  but it wasn't a problem as I was able to use the short lengths to fill in gaps between ports. I just left the planks slightly over-length so I could trim them to final size after they'd dried. I used the usual combination of drill, sharp tools and files to do the trimming:

 

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The oar ports were the trickiest, requiring a drilled hole followed by a square file. I drilled from the outside, holding a block of scrap wood against the inside of the bulwark to minimise the risk of breakout. Once again the boxwood proved its quality, being relatively easy to carve and file. The job also reminded me how glad I was that I'd got a set of decent Swiss files a couple of years ago - Vallorbe brand. Like many of us I'd got by for years with a set of 12 files for £5 from a DIY supermarket, and it wasn't until I got the good set that I found just what a difference they make - beautifully crisp and precise. I found the barrette file particularly useful on this job - that's the one on the left of the two above. It just cuts on one face, so I could get right into corners without damaging other faces.

 

Next job was painting the inner bulwarks. Two coats of diluted red ochre - I may give it more later:

 

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I'm looking forward to finishing off the outer planking next. That'll feel like a milestone reached.

 

Derek

 

Edited by DelF
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8 hours ago, DelF said:

otherwise I would have run out of strips

I’m a bit concerned about several builders near running out of strips both first and second planking...

 

we all have our methods around gun ports, thanks for sharing yours.  I like the idea of a file with a single face, I need to find one of those.

 

I sometimes cut a jig from scrap about 3-4mm height, long enough to hold on to, and the exact width of the gun port. Then attach 220 to one width side and 320 to the other with double sided tape and use it for a “file.” Being the exact width of the gun port and smooth wood on the sides gives me consistency. 

 

Looking good!

Edited by glbarlow
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