Jump to content
DelF

HMS Speedy by Delf - Vanguard Models - Scale 1:64 - Master Shipwright edition

Recommended Posts

Thanks as always for the comments and likes.

 

I'm still working on the outer bulwark planking, trimming the gun and oar ports. The miniature veritas spokeshave was ideal for trimming along the top of the bulwarks:

IMG_1558.thumb.JPG.f1c2b241390b017dd992aee689f2806b.JPG

Trimming the ports was an exercise in care. I used the same tools as for the inside planking, but the outside will show more and there are no fancy decorations to cover up rough edges. Once I'd trimmed the ports I gave the hull a quick coat of shellac to reveal any spots still needing sanding:

IMG_1564.thumb.JPG.fab703991ecf2b1beb64f57ff11bd1a6.JPG

IMG_1566.thumb.JPG.ad0949b45866b1489115085b60d5f515.JPG

On the whole I'm reasonably pleased. Probably some work still needed around the bows, but not too much when you consider the amount of coppoering.

 

Next, I tackled the wales. I took Chris's advice and used PVA and pins for these strakes. I'll paint the wales so the pins are not a problem. However, although the pins supplied with the kit were good for the first planking, I found they weren't beefy enough for boxwood, even with pilot holes. I used slightly larger pins - 0.7mm as opposed to 0.5mm, and they were fine. I also used Super 'Phatic glue as recommended by Glenn (Scarborough Glenn, I think, not Texas Glenn) and that also seemed to work fine. It was certainly easy to apply with the supplied nozzle.

 

IMG_1567.thumb.JPG.75a46529fdc9a240c95674fda669747f.JPG

Finally, I attached the prow, keel and sternpost. Here's the prow being glued:

 

IMG_1568.thumb.JPG.45e99f7310d7783b31cd9df15c961d42.JPG

This is another good example of Chris Watton's attention to detail - the four pegs supplied in the kit make it easy to ensure the prow is perfectly aligned as it dries.

 

The time for coppering approaches! All I need to do is mark the waterline and make sure the hull is smooth - I need to fill in some gaps around the keel and sternpost. I'm grateful to other folks' logs for showing me how careful I will need to be in marking the waterline accurately.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m envious of the boxwood planking.  Your work and the boxwood make for a very good looking result.  
 

 Yes Texas Glenn is all about the CA, it goes well with my general lack of patience.  I do use PVA on a lot of the model for parts that I need to align, so I’m not a total fanatic.

 

You're doing great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/10/2020 at 7:38 AM, DelF said:

decent Swiss files a couple of years ago - Vallorbe brand. I found the barrette file particularly useful on this job

Thanks for the inspiration. I bought a set of 6 Vallorbe files, then also bought two of the barrette files (#1 & #2), so much better than the files I’ve had for years. I used them in making my hatch lap joints for my in-progress cutter. Their precision cutting really helped. Admiral Cochrane approves. 

 

 

09D35629-1944-4772-A966-5BCF821E3E96.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great! Glad to help. I've gradually tried to replace my 'cheap & cheerful' tools with quality versions - the investment is always worth it. Like your paint job, btw.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the Vallorbe website is like walking into a candy store. They have so much choice. Never have know so much choice existed. I've just placed an order for their models:

   Limes de précision:  flat grooved on 3 sides and one grooved on 2 sides (top and bottom),

  and what they call rifloir, ones that have curved endings.

 

Thanks very VERY much for mentioning the site. Now all I have to do is keep impatiently looking at my mailbox.

 

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s great Richard. At this rate I’ll have to ask Vallorbe for commission.  I got a mixed set of Their files, #2 and #4 cut, and that’s given me all the files I need (so far!). 
 

Derek

 

Btw I think rifloir is the same as riffler 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a query folks I am having difficulty working out which files to order  - so many .

For "our" needs can someone point me at some product ids especially for a suitable set - I have finishing the ports in mind I always make heavy weather of them and I think some proper files would help. And what is the "Swiss cut option ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi SpyGlass

 

 On my mobile so can’t find record of set I bought  - I’ll try tomorrow. However, if you just get one file I’d recommend a barrette for the reasons I’ve mentioned. See here. #4 cut is a good choice for very fine work; #2 cut is coarser and therefore removes material faster but still gives a very good finish. The site I’ve pointed to has a bewildering array of files.
 

My set has 12 which is most of what I’ll ever need. The only additions I might possibly go for are slotting files - very fine files that jewellers use for cutting slots in small screws, and maybe some rifflers - the ones with curved ends for filing in awkward places. But I just like collecting tools!

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not knowing where you are located Bonjour SpyGlass,

 

Vallorbe seems to sell directly to only people resident in Switzerland. I live in France so I used two French websites in order to order some of their files.

 

Both sites will deliver internationally. I not knowing where you are located, but you should be able to find a local site where Vallorbe files are sold.

 

http://ecatalog-mob.maqprint.fr/chapitre.php?cha_id=920

 

The above site is well organized

 

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks chaps my problem is simply which files are which - i can get them from various places  into teh UK.

I have already lots of files i have collected over the years of very varying qualities - but they are all in store.

What I know I need is a top quality set  if only for gun and oar ports  - none of my present ones are really good enough and i usually end up with using a scalpel blade  but as I get shakier that get more and more dangerous!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi again SpyGlass

 

I've now got to my PC and found the set I bought a couple of years ago, from Eternal Tools - here. To be honest, I don't use all the files in the set, and could probably have done just as well with one of the sets of 6.

 

Eternal also sell in the US and Europe. The following video gives a really good review of Vallorbe files, and might help answer some of the questions you and others have about the use of the different file types.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Derek

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2020 at 4:49 PM, SpyGlass said:

which files to order 

I order a packaged set of six (which look like Derek's photo) from Amazon then ordered the two barrettes as individual files also from Amazon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started coppering Speedy.

 

IMG_1614.thumb.JPG.104fbddda20d0c3b628ebbdb99ccfdc3.JPG

Unfortunately I've had to put the work on hold for a while as I've developed an adverse reaction to CA. I started to notice a problem during second planking when I suffered a streaming nose and constant sneezing. I didn't think it could be an allergy as the symptoms persisted long after exposure, and I'd used CA plenty of times before. I just thought I had a seasonal cold. However the same symptoms started again almost as soon as I began using CA on the copper plates. I did a bit of research, and according to Wikipedia around 5% of people will develop sensitivity to CA after prolonged exposure, and will suffer flu-like symptoms. I think prolonged is the key word - I'd never used CA for extended periods until I did the second planking, and that seems to have triggered the sensitivity and now I seem to be stuck with it. Looking for alternatives I tried odourless CA but I couldn't find one up to the job, and other glues don't seem suitable either. 

 

So I've concluded I need to let the current symptoms settle down, then start using the CA gel again but this time wearing a mask and with a fan blowing the fumes away. Probably should have been doing that all along. In the meantime I'm tackling some of the deck furniture, starting with the capstan and pumps - small but satisfying mini projects.

 

IMG_1629_edited-1.thumb.JPG.c1237bf2b7a328cac22be71fc8d395f4.JPGIMG_1630_edited-1.thumb.JPG.d39df33fb991eb5b0d403306bdbb2f34.JPG

On the pumps, I tried the AK 174 burnishing fluid that Chris recommends in the manual. It works well, but I found that for good results it's best to rub the photo etch pieces with very fine (#0000) steel wool before assembly, then soak them in acetone or white vinegar for a few minutes before using the AK fluid. The result is much better than trying to paint such small and detailed parts.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, DelF said:

I did a bit of research, and according to Wikipedia around 5% of people will develop sensitivity to CA after prolonged exposure, and will suffer flu-like symptoms. I think prolonged is the key word - I'd never used CA for extended periods until I did the second planking, and that seems to have triggered the sensitivity and now I seem to be stuck with it.

I have noticed several people, probably many more, on this forum with CA allergies and that is quite unfortunate. How long were you staying around the fumes during the second planking? I go very slow, usually only a pair of planks at a time, but I'm still thinking that I should set up some form of ventilation for it to prevent developing a reaction.

 

Everything is looking very nice btw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, VTHokiEE said:

How long were you staying around the fumes during the second planking?

Probably not long on each session. Like you I went fairly slowly - maybe two or three pairs of planks per day. However I was doing it almost every day until I got the second planking finished, and I think it was that prolonged stretch that brought on the adverse reaction. I would  strongly advise playing safe by getting appropriate ventilation.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your speedy is looking great...just to say, I developed an allergy to CA also. Used it quite a bit and then I noticed I was getting all congested in my lungs like a bad chest cold. Then using it at all, gave me these symptoms, even just a small whiff! So yes, now when I have to use it (or any highly volatile substance) I put a fan off to the side to blow the vapors away. That takes care of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Sea Hoss. Glad to hear the fan works for you. That’s definitely the way I’ll go. 
 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cyano has always made my eyes water, like Sea Hoss, I now use a fan and it isn't so bad. Looking great, by the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps its the brand, I've never had any issue with the CA I use.  Sorry you're having that issue, maybe the UK has the allergic kind 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Glenn

 

I think I'm just in the unlucky 5% that're susceptible 🤧. The good news is that proper ventilation seems to be the solution, which I'll try when the symptoms allow. If that doesn't work I'll dig out my old scuba gear and wear that. Come to think of it, that gear might be handy anyway in the current crisis.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The CA-related symptoms have calmed down a bit so I've had another go at coppering today. In the meantime I'd finished a bit more deck furniture:

 IMG_1643_edited-2.JPG.8cd3a5961156a2aaedf9489fc831a7e3.JPG

I've not used photo-etch before and I'm really impressed with the detail you get - particularly on the deck pumps. I'd struggle to scratch build work of this quality. The recommended AK 174 burnishing fluid leaves a nice finish. The fluid looks like Casey's Brass Black, which I normally use, and works in a similar fashion. I mentioned the importance of cleaning the brass in a previous post. I should add that, as with Brass Black, I find I get the best finish by dipping in the fluid until the brass is sufficiently black all over, taking it out and rinsing in cold water, rubbing all over with a cotton bud to remove any surface powder then repeating. This leads to a deeper and more consistent black.

 

On with the copper. I'll just show one area that I struggled with initially - the bows. You'll see from the photos that I didn't get it right straight away and I'm going to replace at least one of the plates. This is the area I'm working on - I wasn't sure at first how the curved plates on the hull should meet the flat plates on the stem. This is the approach I developed.:

Bow_Copper.thumb.jpg.2e9a2d7fa8bb95fc1656f8519a8c8b28.jpg

I started with a strip of paper the same width as the copper plates and laid it on top of the last row of plates on the stem. Holding the strip flat I pushed the paper into the join between the hull and the stem, and marked the join with a pencil. The following photo shows that I cut the paper template just outside the pencil line - this is to allow a small strip to overlap the hull:

IMG_1645_edited-1.thumb.JPG.703ca7abc6aedbd863759d709584f9bc.JPG

Using the template I cut the plate with my Xuron scissors. These are very sharp and precise - great for cutting thin metal and planks. I'd tried using a small pair of tin snips but they tended to raise the edge of the copper plate.

IMG_1652_edited-1.thumb.JPG.8cf1d4e3e8768c48a77e91fb298dcc96.JPG

Next, I used a piece of scrap wood with a mitred end to crease the plate into the join, before gluing it:

IMG_1646.thumb.JPG.ff0b3fc9a4197136f5d7229bc3d27d9f.JPG

IMG_1647.thumb.JPG.86a32d1f247281ea2fe70cac090e9af5.JPG

A simple matter then to complete the row with another small piece of plate. I then used the same paper template method to cut out the next plate on the hull. This time I cut the template exactly on the pencil line so that the copper plate overlapped the plate on stem:

IMG_1649.thumb.JPG.99abc90039debbae036e27ff8e6278c9.JPG

The next shot shows the area in close-up:

IMG_1650.thumb.JPG.22135cabf52e405c1f610da3d3e18511.JPG

Things never look as neat in close-up! I'll definitely replace the first of the curved plates, but the next two actually look OK from a normal viewing angle.

 

I should add that I'm using surgical gloves every time I handle the copper. I was lucky enough to buy a box of 100 pairs well before CV-19 was heard of. They certainly help to keep the plates free of marks.

 

As for the CA sensitivity, a fan and face mask certainly help. I'm still sneezing a bit, but nowhere near as bad. Ideally, I should have a vacuum pump exhausted to the outside to suck the fumes away. Anyway, I'll persevere - at this rate it'll take longer than the planking and I'll never catch up with Glenn and Vane (not that I'm competitive :rolleyes:).

 

Stay safe everyone.

 

Derek

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, its abit of a challange and you can use various strategies on how to fit square pieces on a round hull. Vanguards copper is ok to work with at least. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe it or not I'm quite enjoying the coppering, despite the CA fumes. It's a new challenge, and for me that's half the pleasure of modelling. 

 

Having said that, I suspect I may not want to do it again once I've finished Speedy!

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, DelF said:

Believe it or not I'm quite enjoying the coppering, despite the CA fumes. It's a new challenge, and for me that's half the pleasure of modelling. 

 

Having said that, I suspect I may not want to do it again once I've finished Speedy!

 

Derek

I found Speedy copper plating quite relaxing. My HMS Victory build had approx 3000 copper plates to fit and that did become a tad tedious at times but the end result was worth it on both builds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...