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La Niña by CRI-CRI - scale 1/48 - ship of Cristoforo Colombo - 1492 - FINISHED


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Cri-Cri, the lower "block" would be taken all the way down to the keel, if the Lomellina wreck (probably built around 1503, wrecked 1516) is any guide. In French it used to be known as a sep de drisse - in English it's a halyard knight.

 

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However this picture shows the knight for the main halyard of the ship, which would be taking a lot of weight and force. There wasn't one found for either the foremast, or (interestingly) for the lateen mizzen. Nonetheless that's how I did it for my own lateen model:

 

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There's a bit of an issue with off-centre (twisting) forces caused by the rope running from the centre of the upper block down to the far right-hand sheave of the knight, but I don't now that there's anything you can do about that except accept that it happens.

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Thanks Louie da fly  😀

 

A french expert told me that the lower block was around 1480 an archaic block articulated on a cringle

(Halyard knights arrive later)

I would add that a large 600 kg antenna requires four reals, even using a capstan, otherwise, hoisting would be difficult

Three reals is good for the misain mast, not for the main mast

 

Finally, the pulley followed the inclination of the mast, (8° on the Niña), that is the reason why it was articulated

Later, the halyard knights followed the same angle as the mast. (Otherwise, they would break quickly)

 

I think that such a disposition prevented the problem of twisting rope you met on your referenced model

 

Regards,

 

Christian

 

Edited by CRI-CRI
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Very interesting explanation, Christian. I didn't know about the cringle suspension, but it makes sense - as does angling the knight to follow the inclination of the mast (which I also did on my own model).

 

I agree about the need for 4 sheaves on a large yard or antenna. I only used three on my own, as blocks like this had been found in Byzantine shipwreck remains.

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