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Ah Ha!

 

Good evening everyone from Cornwall.

 

Now I only have to work out how to post photos.

 

I took Chuck at his word as to the cost of shipping from the USA and bought a Proxxon scroll saw and an 8' x 4' piece of Russian Birch ply (for I guess about the same cost, and began work on January 5. I've broken about 8 blades, exhausted ferocious concentration, still have all my fingers and I'm quietly pleased with the result. I'd put up a picture but that may have to await the return home of one of my children to show me how.

 

Fred 

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Welcome Fred.....Enjoy the project.   That scroll saw is money well spent.  It opens up a world of possibilities for you now.

 

I just gave you one more view....so you are catching up!!! ;)

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Thank you Chuck. I've taken great pleasure following everyone's build logs. I'm very conscious that with only two build to my name - Amati's Lady Nelson and AL's Bounty - I'm batting too high up the order for my skill level but nothing ventured nothing gained.

 

I thought very hard before joining the project. The deciding factor - by a country mile - was having Chuck's guidance at every stage. What a way to learn .

 

Fred

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Im not feeling any pressure.....everything will be fine.

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I like your adventurous spirit, Fred! When I get interested in something I tend to jump in with both feet also. I'm currently working on the Medway Longboat and loving it. Reading some of the Winnie build logs has certainly captured my attention and, although I'm holding off right now, I can feel the pull. You seem to have a bit more in depth experience than I do at this point since you have completed the Lady Nelson and the Bounty. I started off with a small AL dory, then I built the Maris Stella Batelina and the Midwest Indian Canoe before beginning the Longboat. I'm sure I'd be in way over my head but I do enjoy being challenged and learning...

 

I'll be following your progress closely on this beautiful ship. Congratulations and good luck!

 

Bob 

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Welcome aboard Fred. Follow what Chuck says, go slow and enjoy the ride!

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I've gone off piste a bit - in two respects. First I've inserted plywood fillets between the frames. It does make the whole structure absolutely solid. I hope that will make sanding and planking easier. I haven't the confidence to do either out of a building frame. Secondly I've left off the beautiful Syren laser cut prow. I feel certain I would break it or damage it over the course of sanding. I think I can align it correctly when the time comes.

 

I know if it all goes pear shaped I can simply purchase the Syren bulkhead package but I'm happy going along this way for the moment.

 

Fred

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I wish looking back I'd taken a little more trouble lining up the outer edges of my plywood fillets. They look scrappy and though they will all be covered up in due course it irritates me. Oh well -live and learn.

 

The last three frames are not yet glued in. I have not filed the rabbet on the BF yet. That's todays job.

Fred

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These are all familiar (but not very good - I need to think about my backdrops) pictures.

 

I didn't find the stern frames at all easy. I cut my own bulkheads rather than using the laser cut parts and I found that any slight inaccuracy at the junction of the bulkheads and the bulkhead former produces a big difference at the ends of the frames. But , with slow and steady as my watchwords I filed away and got them I think tolerably well lined up. The stern window guides were essential. The sharp eyed will see I had to push two of the frames over a tiny bit with a brace off the bulkhead former. It all seems OK - the gap around the window aperture is nice and even.

 

I'm not quite sure of the junction between between frames ST C/D and the bottom of the counter/incoming planking. I'm studying all the other build logs. I know I have a couple more bits of wood still to go in. I suspect it becomes clear as you work on it.

 

Faring the outside I thought quite therapeutic. One or two of my bulkhead horns were out - just by a couple of millimetres and only it seems right at the top. I suspect inaccurate filing of the slots in the bulkheads. I will go through and spend as much time as I need making sure everything looks OK before planking otherwise I will, have unwelcome rises and falls.

 

Its blowing a gale and lashing down with rain here in Cornwall (UK) so a good day for some boat building.

 

I'm thoroughly enjoying the project. Thank you Chuck for creating it!

 

Fred

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It looks very good.  Your care in planning has paid off.  It is important at this stage and she looks great!!!

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Hi Fred;

 

I agree with Chuck, it is looking good. However, one thing I can see is nagging at me a bit: are the timbers for the lower cills of the stern windows curving down at the outer end as they should? It might just be the photographs, but they look as though they are all in a straight line, whereas the bottoms of the windows should follow the curve of the upper counter moulding. Unless the timbers I am looking at are just infill pieces, there to help the ply facing piece take on the correct curvature, in which case please ignore my comment and carry on the good work.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

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Thank you Chuck.

 

Thank you Mark. I've just been to check.You're right. They are not in a straight line but they do not curve as much as the windows on the laser cut transom piece that covers them and clearly they should. I'm going to have a think about it. I'm not sure it matters. If it does I'll have to get a file out and see what I can do. Good spot and thanks for drawing it to my attention.

 

Fred

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The curve appears to me to be very subtle, unless this is a matter of the angle on this picture.

 

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Looking back at Chuck's  build log, the curve is really hard to see until the molding is added.

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It is a very gentle curve. The cills on mine don't curve quite enough. I don't think it matters. We'll see when I come to put the laser cut parts on (the fit seems good). But  it was a silly mistake.

 

I sometimes think I shall make so many mistakes through inexperience that I should buy Chuck's laser cut bulkheads and start a second Winnie running a chapter behind the one I'm presently building. That way I'd hopefully make all the mistakes on the first and have no excuse for going wrong on the second. I shall review at the end of chapter 2!

 

Fred

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