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popeye the sailor

Revell B 17 'Memphis Belle' - 1:72 by Popeye

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31 minutes ago, Roger Pellett said:

If my memory is correct, I believe that Fokker built short haul commercial aircraft used by commuter airlines during my “business travel” lifetime.

 

Roger

in their later years, in their early years they built the baddest fighter planes in the sky....

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53 minutes ago, Egilman said:

in their later years, in their early years they built the baddest fighter planes in the sky....

Actually, the same man, two different companies.

In Schwerin, Fokker invented the fighter plane with the Fokker E.I / II / III. The reason for the so-called Fokker-plague. The Fokker Triplanes became famous and the Fokker D.VII was the only plane type mentioned in the peace treaty.

After the war, Fokker went back to the Netherlands. First, to realize more military planes, but soon starting with civilian airliners. After WW2, some Trainers, turboprop transports and some jet Transportsteuerung were designed and became quite popular with hundreds sold.

They produced license-build combat aircraft in hundreds, too, like the F-104.

 

Lateron, EADS (Mercedes Benz) got hold on Fokker and, in Short, did result in a cease of ops.

Some remains are still operational, mostly to provide spare parts.

 

 

Greetings

Thomas
 

(Pictures from displayed airframes of the National Aviation Museum of the Netherlands in Lelystad - please support the museums)

 

 

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15 minutes ago, tomwilberg said:

Actually, the same man, two different companies.

Personally, I don't see the distinction.... 

 

The Smithsonian, after the war, tested the D.VII airframe to 13 g's at the behest of the Air Corps to find out what it took to break one....

 

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48 minutes ago, Jack12477 said:

There are some reproduction full size Fokkers in the WW 1 Collection at the Rhinebeck Aerodrome  

Thanks for that Jack.... Beautiful Airplanes....

 

Read this....

 

Fokker D.VII

 

Or this....

 

Fokker DR.1

Edited by Egilman

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you misread my post Thomas........I'm aware that they are all separate companies.....I've read about most of the info you listed.   in the book,  they mention the Stuka.........haven't seen the full name for the plane on any model boxes...I don't think it would fit ;)   very nice pictures of the pink lady {can't believe I spelt Focke wrong.......}

 

nice to know someone else like the FW Ken........I built a lot of them in my youth.   I also built a large scale Stuka.........sadly it was destroyed by my brothers and sister { only one sister was involved in nose diving it into a stump}.  there are eight of us

 

you'll have to enlighten me on the Do200........don't think Dornier built one.........I've never built one.

 

not having done any research on her Mark...I'd have never picked up on any mistakes.   the secret is safe with me  ;) .........still a beautiful model in my eyes.

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Richthofen test flown the D VII himself and didn't like the way it handled,  so it halted for modifications........he later flew the Dr 1 and loved it.  little did he know that there was a flaw where it would lose a wing.......for those it happened to,  they never lived to tell about it.  I have a Guillows Dr 1 waiting for tissue at the moment........when I lived in Florida,  I built  Fokker D VIII....best flying model I ever built  :) 

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2 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

you'll have to enlighten me on the Do200........don't think Dornier built one.........I've never built one.

Ken got the reference Denis, all the captured/rebuilt B-17's the germans had (around 25 or so) were labeled DO for Dornier 200 and assigned to KG 200 hoping to keep it secret... They used them quite often cause they simply didn't have any other aircraft of their own design that could do what the B-17 could..... The German pilots that were graced with the opportunity to fly them loved them....

 

When you built the Wolfhund, you inadvertantly built one....

Edited by Egilman

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strange they didn't call them that in the book.  there is a glossary in the back of the book listing every type of plane that the Germans had,  as well as the ones they captured and lost.   they had short range bombing capability at the time.   I'll have to read through the chapter about the B 17 again to see if I missed this.

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My understanding was they used them as high speed transports. they were faster than anything the germans had as transports and they were well familiar with their toughness/durability.... I imagine that it is possible that they used them as bombers, but I don't recall reading that...... KG 200 was their special projects squadron, stuff that they wished to keep secret....

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they were use to run secret missions and reconnaissance.........some of those missions were secret bomb runs.  they had FW 200's,  Ju90's and Ju 290's...none of these could be retrofitted for heavy bomber operations.  I did read through the chapter........it is in there.......called the Dornier Do200,  I must have mistook it for another plane and didn't see the correlation.  ....this comes from the book of KG 200.

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you can add 'Wally's Wheels',  'the Ground Hog',  and 'Badger Beauty V'.......they were captured later.   some were damaged severely,  and used for parts.  I did get a picture of the tail gear tub installation.......

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I don't remember where I got it from but after the war they recovered somewhere between 20-25 of them in flyable condition. And yeah they were assigned to the "Commando" units for secret missions which undoubtedly  included dropping bomb at some point..... They also had several B-24's but just a few, B-24's generally didn't fare well crash landing so it wasn't as easy for them to repair them.... Somewhere in my library I have a book of reminisces of a pilot that flew for KG-200, If I remember right there was no real proof of what he said but he did say it.... KG200 was top secret and not much of what they did was recorded nor did a lot of the records survive....

 

I've told people about the B-17's that the germans were flying during the war and some of them called me crazy and wouldn't believe that the Germans were interested in flying enemy aircraft..... Heck the Germans would use anything they got their hands on if it would work.... So did the russians and so did we.... (the vaunted 88 comes to mind) and the germans were all about learning new tech especially when it came to building 4-engined aircraft.....

 

Your info coincides with what I remember when I was researching it..... one of those almost forgotten paragraphs of history that are fantastic to those not familiar....

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The Russians were well known for tearing down, examining, and making carbon copies of our aircraft. The B-29 I recall specifically as they couldn't get certain parts of it right even though they copied ours bolt for bolt. 

It's not widely known in the West, but the Russians had a four engine transport/bomber of their own that was capable of trans-Atlantic flight. Stalin flew in it to the USA for a conference in 1942. I have the model of it and will build it in the near future.

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They actually got 4 B-29's that were damaged over Japan and overflew to vladivostok and were interned. Three of them were damaged beyond repair but one was almost untouched. (it's fuel tanks were holed and the fuel loss did not allow them to return to Tinian)...... The crew actually landed it on the runway to the great excitement of the Soviet AF officers present..... They threw them parties and did the whole comrade thing until they were told they were being interned. They were eventually allowed to "escape" through Iran at one of the transfer points for lend lease going into Russia, but the russians kept the plane of course They actually built their version the TU-2 or was it 4, my mind is not remembering it right at this moment. But I do remember the shock our side had when three flights of them showed up at one of their May Day parade/flybys...... (they weren't generally liked by the russians assigned to fly them, they were very unreliable)

Edited by Egilman

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23 minutes ago, CDW said:

the Russians had a four engine transport/bomber of their own that was capable of trans-Atlantic flight. Stalin flew in it to the USA for a conference in 1942. I have the model of it and will build it in the near future.

I will definitely pull up a ringside seat for that one....

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the list of captured planes is long.........B 25's,  B 24's....a couple P 38 lightnings........British planes....and others.   the treaty of Versailles,  signed at the end of WWI limited the Germans from building up their air force...what they had was to be completely destroyed.  as Tom pointed out,  Anthony Fokker moved his entire operation to the Netherlands......including aircraft already built.  by the beginnings of WWII,  Germany had built up a small air force,  but most of the county's planes were geared for civilian transport.

  when I saw the Wulfe Hound,  I thought it was too good a subject to pass over ;) 

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9 hours ago, CDW said:

The Russians were well known for tearing down, examining, and making carbon copies of our aircraft. The B-29 I recall specifically as they couldn't get certain parts of it right even though they copied ours bolt for bolt. 

They still do that.  They and Chinese.  Both countries have had "issues" with copying American jets as the engine metal technology is behind the curve.  

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Yes, indeed, the F-104 is a very special bird.

A friend of mine used to fly navy on F-104G. Long ago. That thing nearly killed him.

A few months ago, we where at a model exhibition near Utrecht...    ...and geee! A model builder had exactly his old ship in 1:48 scale on display. That was a moment....

 

Btw: I do have that exactly kit (F-104G JaBoG 33 flyout 1:32) on my pile.


Greetings

Thomas

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