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Justin P.

Workshop Essentials - Favorite Features

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Hi All, 

 

As Im closing in on the end of my current build and looking forward to my next, Im thinking of undertaking a major redesign/rebuild of my current workshop "area." (read: Admiral designated corner of garage).   I have come to realization that I will not likely be moving, or convincing my family to let me move into the guest bedroom...LOL...so I must resign myself to my permanent location. 

 

I have about 7.5' x 9' to work with and currently have one bench and misc assortment of odd furniture that does an ok job accommodating a lathe, disc and thickness sander, scroll saw, small tools etc.   Im thinking of completely overhauling this space, up to and including rebuilding space specific benches and storage.   What I find is that Im not only cold, but also constantly having to move things around to accommodate whatever task I need to undertake.  This eats up time and has lead to accidents as my spatial awareness is always challenged to remember where my model is and that I should not knock it off the bench!  

 

What Im asking the collective group is:   What are the best features of your own workshops/shipyards?   What hacks, bench details, surfaces etc do you find to be the best?   What strange things have you adopted/adapted that have really worked for you?   What are the most important things NOT to overlook?  Do you have kids, any particular measure you have taken to ensure the safety of kids in the garage who might poke around?   What would you do if you could?   What heating solutions, if any, are those of you in uninsulated areas using for winter work?

 

I don't have an unlimited budget but I am willing to invest a bit more than a passive hobbyist might.  

 

My list of must haves are:

Plan Board (Ideas?  I hate to commit too much space to this.   Looking at Plan station type of solutions: https://www.amazon.com/Plan-Station-Portable-Workbench-WS3800/dp/B075V3LX1H)

Safety/Securing Heavy Equipment.  

Overhead Lighting (shop lighting)

Dust Mitigation (vacuum line for tools, perhaps overhead or acquiring extra long vacuum line to dedicated small shop vac)

Plenty of Power (I am currently overburdening a single 4 outlet circuit that is also running a garage refrigerator. I need to share this burden out a bit.)

Small Tool Wall storage

Misc Wood storage (off floor)

 

Thanks all for your input!   

 

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    Well Justin, first off I would suggest looking at the topic So Where Do You Do Yours Then (Model Making That Is)   There are close to 30 pages of suggestions there that would be of help.  I myself, have put my two cents in it on page 26. 

    Personally, the thing I have found to be the most helpful to me has been mounting just about all of my equipment on rolling tables or benches.  It can allow you to have more space to work in by rolling the equipment that is not needed at the moment out of your way.  My entire shop used to share room with our cars where all I needed to do to work was to back the cars out, leaving plenty of space to move the equipment from the perimeter for working space.    

    Once I became confined to a wheelchair, most of my shop moved to the basement, but I still find that having the tools mobile makes my work easier. (Not to mention much warmer in our WI winters.)

Edited by BETAQDAVE
typo

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For plan storage, at least for the one's for the "current" project, someone was using an old roller blind.  When they were done, the plans rolled up and out of the way.

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Planning the utilities is the first job, and for you I think that electric service and dust collection ducts are most important.  For electric service.  one or two 4ft outlet strips will serve your need.  Below is a link to a 4ft strip with 18 outlets for $31, and this will likely serve your need.  So far as dust collection, I recommend 2.5 inch tube with swept elbows and blast gates as needed (link below), however a 'plumber's special' from PVC sch 40 is perfectly ok, but adapting to various machines might be difficult under some circumstances.   Also, include a Thien-type dust separator on a 5 gallon bucket in your dust collection system, and put a HEPA filter on your vac.  You can built a separator, or buy a 'Dust Stopper' at Home Depot for $40. 

 

outlet strip:

 

https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/electrical/power-strips/surge-protectors/global-8482-48-18-outlet-aluminum-power-strip-with-15-cord?infoParam.campaignId=T9F&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4Y-Ux9-a5wIVA9vACh3I3gMMEAQYASABEgIUtfD_BwE

 

dust collection starter kit

 

https://www.rockler.com/2-1-2-dust-collection-starter-kit

 

Home Depot Dust Stopper for 5 gallon bucket

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustopper-High-Efficiency-Dust-Separator-12-in-Dia-with-2-5-in-Hose-36-in-Long-HD12/302643445

 

 

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2 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    Well Justin, first off I would suggest looking at the topic So Where Do You Do Yours Then (Model Making That Is)   There are close to 30 pages of suggestions there that would be of help.  I myself, have put my two cents in it on page 26. 

Indeed!   Thanks for the heads up.   In all honesty I thought I did a pretty good initial search of back threads to make sure I wasn't stirring up old discussion!   This I think is where really good topic titles come into play...in none of my search terms did I use: "So where do you do yours then (mode making that is)".     Im a little embarrassed now that I somehow missed the well worn thread!   Though...  I can't seem to find it even now.   Searching "workshop" or "shipyard" or "building a workshop" doesn't bring up that thread at all.   Maybe Im not doing something right.  I even tried the title of the thread and it still didn't come up, I got an "ACCESS DENIED - Securi Website Firewall".    How bizarre is that?

 

Cant explain that at all. Never happened before.    

 

 

Edited by Justin P.

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This for me is a timely question as I am just putting the finishing touches on remodeling my workshop including a dedicated workstation for ship model building.  I am fortunate to have space for a heavy duty workbench too so this is just intended for light duty detailed work.  All of my models are scratch built and this may affect some of my preferences.

 

When our house was built the builder built a rough desk in the basement where the house plans could be spread out.  He left it for me when the house was finished.  The desk measured 48x30in.  I used it as built for many years but recently decided to improve it.  In doing so I had the following objectives:

 

1.  Provide a smooth, flat, and level work surface.

 

2. Provide surfaces easy to clean.

 

3. Minimize clutter.

 

4. Provide pleasant surroundings where I want to spend time.

 

Bench Top:  The desk was originally surfaced with rough construction grade plywood that was not flat and could not be kept clean.  I further damaged it by driving screws into it to secure jigs and fixtures.  I replaced the top with one made from 1/2in MDF.  The top is fastened to a “ladder frame” made from 2in x 4in construction lumber planed flat on my jointer.  The top/ladder frame is balanced to ensure that it stays flat.

 

B80379BB-7537-47D7-9DB2-B51A755AAA61.thumb.jpeg.4cf498c26e2ad6797b1a8e713622123a.jpeg

Not apparent in the photo is a grid of brass inserts screwed into the top.  The inserts are each drilled and tapped for a 1/4in-20 machine screw allowing me to secure jigs, honing strop, miter box etc without damaging the top.  When not in use each insert is plugged with a slotted head set screw.  The top sits in a frame in the desk and is level and flat.

 

Here is the finished work station:  The Aluminum panel on the lower left is my speed control for my rotary tool and Jarmac disc sander.It can also be used foe soldering iron temperature control.  It is nothing more that a household light dimmer wire.d to a dedicated socket.  The adjustable lamp can be easily mounted on either side of the bench. The Aluminum pad reinforcing the unused

mounting hole is visible on the right hand side of the bench top.  There are brass inserts at the left side of the bench front for mounting my swivel vise, now in it’s storage position at the back left corner.  The cupboard stores clutter like my two boxes of small clamps and my numbered drills that I always seem to be knocking off an open shelf.  I don’t play golf.  The golf ball was borrowed from my son as a final flatness/level check

325658E7-F0B9-466A-BA1B-6589F362D859.thumb.jpeg.1ef63c2bf2ea55018e89318d8a6477f2.jpeg

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13 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

Here is the finished work station:  The Aluminum panel on the lower left is my speed control for my rotary tool and Jarmac disc sander.It can also be used foe soldering iron temperature control.  It is nothing more that a household light dimmer wire.d to a dedicated socket.  

That is great stuff right there.   Im not sure I have the electrical know how to put something like that together safely, but its a great idea.   Curious about the durability of the MDF top...   for some reason I feel like MDF is not that durable but Im guessing there are different grades I should explore.   Mainly Im thinking of adding an overhang to the front of the bench which can be used for clamping and wonder if the MDF will be OK without a support directly underneath.   I currently have construction grade plywood topped with self-healing cut mats which Ive like so far and was thinking about repeating in the new benches, though changing out the 1/2" I currently have and bumping up to 3/4" with an endcap.

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12 hours ago, druxey said:

If, as you've mentioned, children may wander in unsupervised, cupboard doors behind which sharp items can be stored and locked, and a master switch to cut all power to the workshop space.

This is one of my top priorities.   I have kids, all my neighbors have kids...  all aged 4-8 and on the weekends they just move like a herd from garage to garage playing bikes, scooters and just generally running the neighborhood.   My kids are pretty well trusting when it comes to tools and areas to avoid, but I don't want to worry about my neighbors kids nor do I want to worry about breaking down equipment every time Im out of the room.   My time in the yard gets interrupted often for tasks inside the house so I might walk away from it for an hour or so and not want to shut down everything and pack up.  

 

A master switch is a great idea...   I wonder if there is someway to do this without significant electrical changes.   Perhaps if I run everything (outlet strips, power tools, lights from the same 2x2 outlet and try to find a similar outlet with a switch or key.    IM not sure how much I can run off one single outlet so Im imagining Ill need multiple plugs and would like to avoid having to unplugging a bunch of stuff every time.   Unfortunately only my disc sander has a safety switch built in...   Cant for the life of me figure out why they wouldn't put one on a Lathe.   

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16 hours ago, Bob Blarney said:

Planning the utilities is the first job, and for you I think that electric service and dust collection ducts are most important.  For electric service.  one or two 4ft outlet strips will serve your need.  Below is a link to a 4ft strip with 18 outlets for $31, and this will likely serve your need.  So far as dust collection, I recommend 2.5 inch tube with swept elbows and blast gates as needed (link below), however a 'plumber's special' from PVC sch 40 is perfectly ok, but adapting to various machines might be difficult under some circumstances.   Also, include a Thien-type dust separator on a 5 gallon bucket in your dust collection system, and put a HEPA filter on your vac.  You can built a separator, or buy a 'Dust Stopper' at Home Depot for $40. 

 

outlet strip:

 

https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/electrical/power-strips/surge-protectors/global-8482-48-18-outlet-aluminum-power-strip-with-15-cord?infoParam.campaignId=T9F&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4Y-Ux9-a5wIVA9vACh3I3gMMEAQYASABEgIUtfD_BwE

 

dust collection starter kit

 

https://www.rockler.com/2-1-2-dust-collection-starter-kit

 

Home Depot Dust Stopper for 5 gallon bucket

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustopper-High-Efficiency-Dust-Separator-12-in-Dia-with-2-5-in-Hose-36-in-Long-HD12/302643445

 

 

These are great ideas.   Im very interested in cable management so perhaps some clever usage of surge protectors would do the trick.   The dust collection is essential, especially given my heat source in the winter and my proximity to our furnace.   To this point Ive been using a small shop vac attached to the tools directly which isn't so bad except for all the setup just to do a single thing here or there...  I often then skip something like hooking up the dust collection.   I need to make it easier or permanent.   Part of the point of doing this is to create enough space so that tools are in place where they are used and ready to go.   No moving them or setup.   I had though of a single like hose suspended that I would just switch from tool to tool as I use them...   but daisy-chaining them as pictured in your post could work too, though looks like it could get elaborate. 

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I have a single detached garage, not insulated and this is what worked for me:

 

1. I built from cheap wood two very heavy solid work benches. I followed the advice from this chap's video on you tube. Great benches, very cheap to make https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTxbcf9zI5o. I chose how tall, wide and long so entirely custom made to my needs. This is by far the most solid design I have come across. 

2. I did not bother with insulation, I got a gas heater which heats up the space quickly. This way I do not use the limited power supply and considering the limited time I have to work and that near zero temperatures are not too often, it makes perfect financial sense.

3. I chose not to paint the brick walls but instead put a lot of lights, more than twice than what I initially thought (about 1000w fluorescent light for a space 5 x 3 m). Very important to have light coming from all directions to avoid shadows. You can never have enough light! 

 

Each has its own very unique set up but the issues above occupied much of my time and successfully I avoided the very expensive complex options

1.jpg.95cd5ddd26847f629d51638e87208c1c.jpg2.jpg.2d04f78d1af2b3d7aed2bd3133d0f125.jpg

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Over the years, it seems that as soon as I finally get the workshop I want built the way I want it, the occasion to move arises! It's almost like a jinx. I'm afraid to finish my fifth,  presently a fifteen year work-in-progress 1,500 square foot "man cave" workshop in a stand-alone building wired with 440 3-phase power, for fear I'll have to leave it! (The wife loved the house. All I cared about was the shop building out back! :D )

 

Designing a workshop is really about personal taste and needs and one's own creativity. In no particular order, here are a few general principles I've discovered over the years.

 

1. Everything needs to have a place to live. "A place for everything and everything in its place." It all has to be easily returnable to its storage place so its location is always (or pretty much always!) easily accessed. This will save an amazing amount of time otherwise wasted looking for things. Storing small hand tools in rolling tool storage chests is a good way to go, the cost of the chests notwithstanding. There's a reason professional mechanics keep their tools in those big "Snap On" tool chests. Unfortunately, you can drop a few grand on a big one. Harbor Freight has some lighter weight models which are entirely sufficient for lighter weight tool collections such as ours at very reasonable prices. (The professional models are expensive because they have to survive daily use sometimes carrying a ton or two of mechanic's tools.) (See: https://www.harborfreight.com/search?limit=108&q=tool chests)

 

2. Workbenches are for doing work on, not for storing stuff on. Any flat surface in a workshop is an invitation to family members to pile high with junk they don't want in the house.  Vigilantly protect your workbenches from that. The smaller the benches, the easier that is to do. Many workbenches are too big. There's no need to consume scarce shop floor space with a four by eight foot free-standing workbench if you aren't using that much space on a daily basis. If you have a larger job to do, lay some plywood on some sawhorses and reclaim valuable floor space by putting them away when the job is done. (Big workbenches can be placed on heavy-duty casters and the space below the bench top used for storage. There's lots of space for drawers there.)

 

2. Recycled kitchen and bathroom cabinets are great for workshop building purposes. If you don't have a local building materials recycling place near you, make friends with a local kitchen and bath remodeling contractor. They frequently simply bust up perfectly good cabinets and counter bases and throw them in the dumpster when remodeling kitchens and bathrooms. Get them to save a good set for you. Most will be happy to have you haul them away for free, so long as you promise to pick them up from the job site as soon as they pull them out. It saves them the work of busting them up and paying the dump fees. (In one of my earlier shops, I scored the Formica-covered cabinetwork from a dentist's office. It was full of small, shallow divided drawers designed for storing small dental instruments. I really hated to leave that one behind!)

 

3.  Put anything that isn't fastened to the walls on casters so it can be moved around. There is no reason to have a big Delta Unisaw cabinet saw with table extensions dominating the center of a workshop when it's only used occasionally. If everything is on casters except counters and cabinets on the walls, and if those counter and cabinet faces are sitting flush with the floor, being able to roll everything out of the way gives you an unobstructed floor that is easily swept clean. That's a huge time-saver and a clean shop is a happy shop. (Do as I say, not as I do!) 

 

4.  You can't ever have too many electrical outlets. There are uniform electrical codes that dictate how many outlets can be on a circuit, but those codes seem to assume every outlet on a circuit will be used at once. In reality, there is little need for concern about overloading a circuit in a workshop because nobody uses more than one high-amperage tool at a time. It's not about how many outlets you have on a circuit, or how many things are plugged into them, but how many are running at one time. Add up the total amperage of what's running at the same time to see if you have enough juice if you're concerned about that. (If your power service is ancient and insufficient for modern energy use, that will be the exception. If you're tripping circuit breakers or the lights dim when you turn on your table saw, call a licensed electrician. Your electrical system probably needs major surgery.)  I place outlets and power strips not only on the wall behind a workbench, but also on the front of the bench, just below the overhang of the bench top. Corded hand-held power tools are almost always easier (and safer) to use on the bench when the cords don't have to be strung across the bench and your working space from a plug in a wall outlet.

 

5. The better the light, the better the work. I use florescent shop lights supplemented by articulated work lamps, some with magnifying lenses, on my workbenches. I'm going to switch over to LED shop lights in the near future. The cost of the LED lights has dropped tremendously in recent times. The savings in power costs is substantial, as is the increase in their bulb and ballast lifespans, but, best of all, they are super-bright. Hang a lot of them. No more flickering and humming, either.  (E.g.: https://www.amazon.com/Barrina-Integrated-Fixture-Utility-Electric/dp/B01HBT3BVM/ref=sr_1_13?hvadid=77721863975721&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvqmt=e&keywords=led+shop+light&qid=1579894392&sr=8-13 )

 

6. Pegboard is your friend. If there's any unoccupied wall space in your shop, it's best paneled with pegboard. I have dozens of small baby food jars that snap onto plastic holders that hang on pegboards. They store all sorts of small parts and fasteners that are immediately visible when I need to find what I'm looking for. There are a lot of things that don't lend themselves to being stored in a drawer because of size or shape. (E.g.: carpenter's squares, long levels, handsaws, etc.) (See: https://world-axiom.com/pegboard-jars-fanatic/ and https://www.hardwareandtools.com/crawford-jc12-pegboard-jar-organizer-2-pack-jkca-2116.html?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=PLA&scid=scbplpJKCA-2116&sc_intid=JKCA-2116&msclkid=10db724b5d881dff92b82c600de48792 )

 

7.  Make it comfortable. Climate control will depend upon one's circumstances. At worst, a sweater and a space heater should suffice to keep one from being uncomfortable in the winter and a fan and open windows in the summer time. Depending upon one's preference, a music system or television is welcome company and a small refrigerator for preferred libations can be welcome additions, so long as they don't distract one while operating dangerous machinery!

 

8.  Finally, every shop needs a comfortable "moaning chair." A moaning chair is essential when one realizes they've made one mistake or another, or can't figure out which way to go next when faced with a problem. Often, sitting down with a tall cold one and just "moaning," inspires a solution to the problem at hand. Also, if it's suitably placed, a visitor can be kept out of the way while your working without risking offending them.

 

Keep us posted on your project! 

Edited by Bob Cleek

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Justin,

 

If you only have room for one workbench that will be used for model making, fixing kids bikes, and miscellaneous honey do chores my MDF top will not be durable enough.  I have another larger workbench also in my shop for rough work.  It has a flush mounted woodworkers vice and a large machinists vice.  The bench top is made from 2in x 6in construction lumber laid edge to edge topped with a piece of 3/4in particle board screwed down with sheet rock screws.  

 

The bench has accumulated 30 years of battle scars, spilled paint, etc and could be renewed by replacing the particle board top but there are a lot of great memories caught up in those battle scars so I decided to leave it alone.IMG_0118.thumb.JPG.a514a9385736012d25faa5141ea952a4.JPGAnother thing that you might want to add is an organized way of keeping your hands clean.  While this may sound silly it has taken me 50 years to learn this.  In this regard the kitchen table modelers have an advantage over modelers working in a garage or basement because they are next to a source of soap and water.  In my case a combination paper towel holder and shelf 

for holding a pump bottle of proprietary hand cleaner.

 

Roger

Edited by Roger Pellett

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7 hours ago, Walt Con said:

I had a little trouble also looking for it but found it under (see below) and author.

Hope this helps 

 

So Where Do You Do Yours Then (Model making That Is)

By Wintergreen, February 15, 2013 in Nautical General Discussion

This is so weird.   I cannot get to it.  I tried to go back in that thread group archive, to page 58 where the very last post that I can see was made Feb 21, 2013.   I must be daft, I had to go back through Wintergreens history to the date of the post you provided to find it...

 

Thank you so Much! 

 

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Hello again,

 

I just remembered this outlet strip that has individual switches for each outlet.  I use this type of strip for my stationary power tools for safety reasons.  I always keep two switches between the power source and the tool, to prevent energizing the tool accidentally while I'm setting it up or changing blades.  So when I'm ready to make a cut, I first switch on the outlet on the strip, and then go to the machine and flip its switch to energize the tool.  

 

https://www.amazon.com/Tripp-Lite-Individually-Controlled-TLP76MSG/dp/B0068LACFI

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If the circuit breaker box is in the garage, trip the breakers for the power.   You can have an electrician come in wire in a keyed switch just for the wiring to your work area.  Most places will be glad to come out, look it over and give you an estimate.  I'm not an electrician so for me, it's call a contractor.  

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13 hours ago, mtaylor said:

If the circuit breaker box is in the garage, trip the breakers for the power.   You can have an electrician come in wire in a keyed switch just for the wiring to your work area.  Most places will be glad to come out, look it over and give you an estimate.  I'm not an electrician so for me, it's call a contractor.  

By the way, circuit breakers protect your building's wiring, >not your body<.  Which brings us to the idea of installing GFI receptacles.  So long as you're in a dry location, then GFI receptacles are not needed - the National Electrical Code only requires them in damp locations or where a plumbing fixture is within an arm's reach of the outlet.  It wouldn't hurt to install one, though.

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1 hour ago, Bob Blarney said:

By the way, circuit breakers protect your building's wiring, >not your body<.  Which brings us to the idea of installing GFI receptacles.  So long as you're in a dry location, then GFI receptacles are not needed - the National Electrical Code only requires them in damp locations or where a plumbing fixture is within an arm's reach of the outlet.  It wouldn't hurt to install one, though.

Excellent point. I have ground fault interrupters on all of my shop outlet circuits. Cheap as they are, there's no excuse not to.  I'd advise them not only for kitchen and bathroom outlet circuits, as per code, but for every circuit where an outlet might be used for an extension cord that runs outdoors.

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I used the threaded inserts mentioned by Roger Pellet for tying down interchangeable bases for my watchmakers lathes on the lathe stand, but didn't think of putting them into the workbench at strategic locations for tying down other moveable equipment - made a mental note for this !

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Perhaps another thought: this is a past-time, something we do in our spare hours. So, I like to be in a pleasant, comfortable atmosphere that is also congenial to the subject I am working on. Hence, I have tried to create around me a bit of a 19th or early 20th century workshop atmosphere. I know, there are practical limitations to comfort, when you work with larger woodworking machinery and the dust it may create in spite of extractions fans etc. For me this is not a modern, efficient industrial environment, but I want to immerse into an atmosphere more contemporary to the models. Therefore, I prefer also 'warm' lighting and being surrounded by wooden cabinets. Not only the final product matters, but the way towards it. After all it is valuable life-time you are spending in the workshop.

Edited by wefalck

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8 hours ago, wefalck said:

After all it is valuable life-time you are spending in the workshop.

Absolutely make your workshop a nice place to be and don't set up things that will be difficult to access, I remember somebody saying once do not put one thing on top of another to save space in the drawer , shelf etc, because that means you have to move something to get to something else, it is a rule that most of us break by the way and we admire those that can stick to it.

Michael

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Thanks for all the great ideas.   Ive been working on a draft design for new benches and plan to price that out once I work up a lumber list.   For now, Ive got to translate the blueprints to a cultist, then to a lumber list.  

As Ive said previously Ive got very limited space, roughly 11' x 7' 4" (in the garage).   What I want is a LOT of surface, place for plans (out of the way) and plenty of peg board, shelving.  

 

In these plans there are two built in overhanging shelves mainly to mount shop lights to.   On the far wall, framed in 2x2 will be half custom cork board for plans measuring under 30 x 40" (I've yet to see plans at 40 x 60" but I may have to cross that bridge when I get there.   This may already accommodate that.    All surfaces are 24" deep, stand at 41.5" high (I mainly work standing at 6') with one sitting area (kneehole).   

 

I used Shapr3d (Free Version) on an iPad to work this up.   I found it amazingly versatile, powerful with a very quick learning curve.  Ive never used CAD anything before, granted this is all building with blocks so how hard could it be. Also, the entire thing is 2x4 and 3/4" plywood.   

1EA87904-E964-41E2-AED7-424D8B0A9BAB.png

A88B8272-2095-4D0D-84A7-F992D4C42A34.png

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1 hour ago, druxey said:

Leave enough pass space for a chair with you seated on it!

Indeed!   I use a stool actually, and it should fit nicely under the bench when not in use.   While seated, yes it might get tight, but one of the reasons I use a stool is that it is easily moved here and there to get out of the way.   

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About a year ago I bought this motorized adjustable height table legs.  Have wanted something like this since my first model (am working on number 46 now) and its changed the way I work. No more bending at awkward angles and trying to work carefully while uncomfortable! Consider adding it underneath a portion of your workbench.

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NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
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