Jump to content
Moab

Can anyone explain square dowels to me...

Recommended Posts

If roots can be square, why not dowels?

 

The real question is how you make square holes to put the dowels into? I saw a drill once that claimed to make square holes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Allen said:

Real cornbread is made in a round cast iron skillet and can't be square.

Ever been to Oklahoma? :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, John Allen said:

Real cornbread is made in a round cast iron skillet and can't be square.

I‘m imagining that you don’t cut up your cornbread and a single serving is the whole skillet 😂.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BETAQDAVE said:

I think those are just mortising bits.

There is a 'trick' using a floating head holding a bit, I think it is known as a 'Rolo' or 'Rollo' or something that sounds like that. The biit has three flutes and it gives a square hole: four flutes, a pentagon and so on, always one side on the finished hole more than the number of flutes. I saw one used once and it seemed almost supernatural but it works! (google it)

 

You know, somehow this isn't as much fun as talking about food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess if it's a round hole, the peg that goes into it is a "dowel," even if the peg is square. Square pegs do go into round holes, actually. It's a traditional fastening option. Drill the pilot hole and then take a suitably sized square peg, whittle the lower edges of the peg so it fits to stick in the hole and then give it a good whack with a big mallet. The square peg expands the round hole to a tight fit in the round hole, yielding what appears as a square peg in a square hole.  (The pegs should be of a harder wood species than the wood into which they are driven.) They are a characteristic decorative feature of Arts and Crafts furniture construction. Essentially the same principles as the treenail, although treenails are generally blind-wedged at the bottom of the hole and a wedge driven at the exposed end of the peg to lock them in place.

 

Article Image
Edited by Bob Cleek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

I guess if it's a round hole, the peg that goes into it is a "dowel," even if the peg is square. Square pegs do go into round holes, actually. It's a traditional fastening option. Drill the pilot hole and then take a suitably sized square peg, whittle the lower edges of the peg so it fits to stick in the hole and then give it a good whack with a big mallet. The square peg expands the round hole to a tight fit in the round hole, yielding what appears as a square peg in a square hole.  (The pegs should be of a harder wood species than the wood into which they are driven.) They are a characteristic decorative feature of Arts and Crafts furniture construction. Essentially the same principles as the treenail, although treenails are generally blind-wedged at the bottom of the hole and a wedge driven at the exposed end of the peg to lock them in place.

 

 

 

Now you did it, Bob.  We're going to have comments about square pegs in round holes. At least it won't be cornbread. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to the more serious topic...

17 hours ago, John Allen said:

Real cornbread is made in a round cast iron skillet and can't be square

Here's my cast iron skillet, in which I could make square(ish) cornbread (if I knew what cornbread was :rolleyes:).

 

IMG_1347.thumb.JPG.2282b9cc8705e6bf56efce51050714a0.JPG

 

Derek

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/25/2020 at 12:59 AM, DelF said:

Getting back to the more serious topic...

Here's my cast iron skillet, in which I could make square(ish) cornbread (if I knew what cornbread was :rolleyes:).

 

IMG_1347.thumb.JPG.2282b9cc8705e6bf56efce51050714a0.JPG

 

Derek

 

 

How does that cast iron do on ceramic top stoves? Used lots of cast iron on electric, gas and wood stoves, bought and used a ceramic top, built in, stove in a house I once owned, never touched it with cast iron so have no experience there. Current electric kitchen stove is nearing replacement time, like cerrmace tops but like the cast iron better. Experience tells me iron and ceramic stove tops would not mix well, is that true with today's ceramics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jud

 

It’s an induction hob. I’m not sure if that’s the same thing as a ceramic hob, but in any case it works fine with cast iron. It also works with stainless steel, so long as it is a magnetic grade. I have to say, it’s the best hob we’ve ever had, by far. Efficient, even heating  and dead easy to clean. 
 

Hope that helps

 

Derek 

Edited by DelF
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just looking at your cast iron skillet Derek, and wondered how do you keep it as clean as that?😁 because no matter what I clean mine with it still looks like I've just took the steak out🤔

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just ‘season’ cast iron ware when it’s new by rubbing in cooking oil then heating it (without food). From then on it seems to be almost non-stick when you wash it. Before I tried it I thought the seasoning trick was an old wives tale, but it seems to work. 
 

I wish you hadn’t mentioned steak - I could just eat one now and it’s only breakfast time here!

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the original seasoning, many of the foods you cook in cast iron cookware will self season at each use if you don't cook foods with high acidic content and avoid cleaning with hot water and soap as you may be used to with normal cookware. If you do need to touch up the seasoning then do the process again in the oven or cheat by using this stuff:  https://www.amazon.com/Lodge-SPRAY-Seasoning-8-Ounce-Yellow/dp/B00J9QVVG8?creativeASIN=B00J9QVVG8&linkCode=w61&imprToken=SrHRv7x3mfqwNo4eohR5JA&slotNum=0

if you need to.

 

Or you could save some money by just using this instead: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Brand-Happy-Canola-Ounces/dp/B07P5V4DCR/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?almBrandId=QW1hem9uIEZyZXNo&fpw=alm&keywords=canola+oil&qid=1580223283&s=home-garden&sr=1-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyNUtCMlI0TjkyQVY2JmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwODQwNDE4Mk82QlUwUjNBVk03WiZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMzg0MTI2MjZSQzExMzlNVE4zViZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU= 

Edited by lmagna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been able to successfully educate my wife about the proper care of my cast iron cookware or my high-carbon steel chef's knives. She throws everything in the dishwasher. God knows I've tried, but to no avail.

 

I've given up and just stored them separately and care for them myself before anybody else in the house can get their hands on them. I quietly retaliate by leaving the toilet seat up. :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...