Jump to content
EricWilliamMarshall

Opium Smuggler 1806 by EricWilliamMarshall - Authentic Holland Models - Scale 1:75 - Schooner

Recommended Posts

Having survived my first wooden ship model build, I’m going to push my luck again! I bought this model in NYC in the mid-90s and never built it. (My sole purchase of wooden ship models in the twentieth century!) It survived fire and flood. I cut one piece and chickened out. Apparently, I was waiting for the Internet and this community to be created so I could soldier on. 

 

The ship in question seems to match a ship mentioned by Chapelle as a 1806 design by Samuel Humphreys called “Yacht for Canton.” (Thanks to trippwj and Roger Pellett for finding that!). The drawing in ‘The Search For Speed Under Sail.‘ is spot on. It’s not clear that this ship was ever built and I’m not aware of any other info regarding this ship.

91653262-FE5F-4B08-8F10-3F6ACA0D59D0.jpeg

42A74EDB-A490-4414-B301-221BE2374DA0.jpeg

5CD4FEBE-A4AF-4F04-8024-B00C69ED8B60.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve also tried to produce shavings similar to a technique used by Phillip Reed for his small scale models. He backs the shavings with paper and then glues the paper-side down to the ship for planking and for decking.  

 

He doesn’t go into detail so I’m merely experimenting based on his idea. Using a wood plane, I made shavings of white pine, popular and maple. I then used hot water to help flatten them.

 

I’ll report back when they have dried.

E4BF7501-BF6A-4B3E-8323-7F6BE2669362.jpeg

4FA7B82E-B423-423C-B3A1-9B6129809AB3.jpeg

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eric

 

I am happy to see this new log.  I am working away at trying to create an 1816 schooner built in Maine with little visual examples.  I learned of the Opium schooners by reading a great book, that I recommend for its full content, Barons of the sea  by Steven Ujifusa.  This story tells about the owners, the builders and the captains of the china clippers.  For any clipper ship builders it's a must read.  However, clearly in the portions of the book detailing the life and business of the trade, these fast schooners racing into Canton were a strong supporting character.    So yes your build is a kit but the style of things like deck fittings et al will be a help to me. 

 

I also like your attempt to experiment with techniques of building planks of different woods.  

 

cheers 

 

jon 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried again with two sheets this time so I could mix and match pieces to break up grain patterns. I used birch instead of the kit’s oak. I taped one sheet on top of another and cut them with an x-acto blade at the same time.

BB8CE339-5C6A-4820-A25E-EAC4815B8993.jpeg

C26B6CEB-AC90-40BB-AF12-607C031A5FBB.jpeg

 

8B25A204-AB06-453C-A91C-0960DD8C4A5E.jpeg

8E42AA5C-94A2-4C9F-BF4E-13F719DEC294.jpeg

BE937628-1871-4211-A130-7BAAE9D9E080.jpeg

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the keel-rabbet sit in the middle-line of the wioden hull?

I had sevre priblems getting the keel in the middle and square. My schooner is still sitting unfinished in my room.... (Started in 1991, but abandoned before rigging was completed)

 

Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amateur, it isn’t exactly in the middle nor was the slot cut a snug fit! So I used one error to compensate for the other error. :) I glued the keel to one side of the slot and used shavings to wedge it to keep it tight while gluing. I will adjust the curves of the hull before I work on the bulwark. It’s not a great plan but it is the current one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The template in the kit for the deck house wrong, way wrong! I should have caught that but I didn’t. Even the most causal observer will note the difference in the gray cut out and the photocopy with decking (except me; I missed it until it was too late).

EDC22CF3-35EF-4221-B8A7-C833A8EC9C65.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warning exotic tool use!

Having mis-cut the boat house slab, I needed to replace that kit part. The company seems to have departed this mortal coil, so I went and made a replacement. I took a scrap piece of pine and penciled in my dimensions. I used a small saw to cut across the grain (since my scrap was twice as thick as I needed) down to just above my desired depth. I then used a flat chisel and a mallet to wack out the waste wood. The cross cuts allow the waste wood to pop out quickly. It also means the chisel doesn’t have to be razor sharp. The whole operation took four or five minutes (plus time for finding the tools). I then used a block plane to flatten the slab.

790F4139-F5C5-404C-ABDD-F42D338ED323.jpeg

D88A861F-5819-481B-9B65-E3DFFCD526BB.jpeg

CE083793-4F95-4A37-A13B-14BAB2EFBDB7.jpeg

BB64BBF4-182C-4B95-8912-A58BDF276623.jpeg

C5DD39EA-DB69-42CD-819F-372C83F0BFB3.jpeg

27859AA8-41D6-4B37-BB70-A268881BDEA5.jpeg

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warning exotic tool use! (Cont’d)

Now that I have correct dimensions roughly, I needed to add the curves to match the sweep of the hull.

 

For the lower half of the deck house slab, I could have used a wide gouge, but I happen to have some old-school molding planes - what folks used before machine routers, from a project to make porch rails with my kids. I took my widest one and dished the center of the curve and then used sand paper wrapped around my mis-cut piece to create the concave curve. I did that twice because I penciled the curves to be cut to match my mis-cut piece instead of the hull.

 

Once that matched, I used the block plane to round the top convex curve. Note: all the curves fan out slightly as the width of hull changes; a few diagonal swipes were used to handle that. For the bottom curve, I then used the hull as a sanding block to match the hull curve.

 

I included a few photos in ‘raking’ light so show the tool marks before sanding and after, so folks have an understanding of how messy (or not) the process is.

EE5CEB77-F872-474D-B1F7-B3F249062D5A.jpeg

58AC67DB-0A39-4FF5-B8AC-F51D1141D6E5.jpeg

74CD88FA-997E-4BDA-B3A9-305091423F72.jpeg

2C46D51D-C7C3-4A91-82A6-0B2EB6B6A711.jpeg

E843B7D5-BFC8-49E6-B7A1-8D525E0C2111.jpeg

A04EDCE0-C875-43A9-B47B-90A86E357901.jpeg

8DBE9838-2C53-4419-A412-0F25AB88080C.jpeg

50041C40-A4DC-49A0-8811-27D985924119.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve attached all the slivers to their proper places on the decks. Then I used a cotton cloth and some hot water to remove the remaining paper. I think it looks better than the printed oak sheet but not as nice as I hoped. It looks better in the photo than the real world. C’est la vie! I going to sit on my hands for a day or two before deciding to proceed or try again.

D9EC5CB9-52F4-426E-BFF0-AF6AEFBFEA68.jpeg

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The kit’s supplied templates for the sides didn’t match the supplied hull. I was at loss as to how to proceed. I made in templates by putting (yellow) tape below the deck on the sides of the hull as per the plans then put a second layer of (blue) tape, which I marked with pencil to capture the curve. I removed the blue tape and stuck it to the sheet to be cut, thus transferring the 3D curve to a 2D surface for cutting. I then added a parallel line to match the transferred line and then did my cutting. If the there is a standard way to do this, I’m all ears!

 

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photos of the process described above. I used yellow to mark the suggested line in the plans and then overlaid the blue tape and 'felt' for the bump of the overlap and marked it in pencil.  

 

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_1d3e4.jpg.f7b72e83812eb36c6bbc21e947a15647.jpg

Then I removed the blue tape and laid it on the wood to cut, added an offset then cut.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_1d3e1.jpg.4839840ff10693523ef699be36fb827b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jond I finished your suggested book, Barons of the Seas. It was an interesting history - I was surprised by how many the wealth families with connections to the opium trade described are names familiar to anyone who has lived in NYC! I didn’t realize how much overlap existed between the clippers and steamships nor to the mechanics and economics of the opium trade.  What are some of your favorite books that you would recommend?

 

Unrelated, I haven’t found any good references for deck fittings or rigging and I’m open to suggestions!

 

In the absence of an good intel, I’ll just build the kit as per the limited details given in the kit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More work on the deck, a bit of hull shaping and one bulwark attached! The runs of decking were sliced with an xacto blade then I used a small brush to add a bit of brown stain to hide the fresh cut of the wood. The photo shows the deck after a coat of varnish.

1D542DC6-3B1F-4866-B99B-7D1DDC41A30F.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...