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Dan Vadas

HMS Vulture 1776 by Dan Vadas - 1:48 scale - 16 gun "Swan" class sloop from TFFM plans - Finished

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Thank you all :) .

 

do you wish you had done one more row of planking for those eye bolts?

 

 

Not really, the eyebolts on the starboard side of the main mast are the same. I had to draw the line as to how many planks I wanted to lay.

 

Dan,

without going back though your build log, can I ask about the clear finish ?

I know you use wipe on poly, but do you buff it between coats with steel wool ?  What's the brand name of the product please ?

 

It's "Minwax" Satin finish, and I don't buff between coats - no need to.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Good to see you back in the shop, Danny - every little step you complete is one less to do.

 

John

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Danny, I've been following your builds since I joined this website and have yet to comment on one of them. Your work is simply immaculate. I'm glad to see some active progress despite the difficulties.

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Thanks again Doris, John, Patrick (welcome to my Log) and Edwin :) .

 

Belfry

 

The Belfry roof is carved from a single piece of English Box :

 

Belfry 001.jpg

 

Belfry 003.jpg

 

The two stanchions are dark Swiss Pear and the Headstock is English Box. I turned the bell on the lathe and scratchbuilt the two cleats from brass sheet :

 

Belfry 004.jpgBelfry 005.jpg

 

The belfry assembly fixed in place :

 

Belfry 006.jpg

 

Belfry 007.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Very very nice Danny . I love the woods you have used . Is all the wood from hobby mill ? I know the framing is from the hobbymill but just wondered about the other timbers . Or did you source some from within Australia .


David

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Nice belfry Danny for whom does it toll?

 

Michael

Looks like you are a man who likes to read a good book.  Hemingway was always a good read.

David B

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very nice Progress Danny,

 

your beautiful build in all Details of this Swan Class is an awesome sight !

 

Nils

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Thank you David, Michael, Patrick, Nils, Mohamad and Jan.

 

Is all the wood from hobby mill ? I know the framing is from the hobbymill but just wondered about the other timbers . Or did you source some from within Australia .

 

 

David, that info can be found HERE

 

Nice belfry Danny for whom does it toll?

 

 

Hopefully not for me Michael :mellow:  .

 

how large (or should I say: tiny) is that wonderfull bell?

 

 

Jan, it's 5mm x 5mm.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Forecastle Railing and Spar Rack

 

There is a Railing on the aft end of the Forecastle. Two Stanchions support the port and starboard sections. Each stanchion is fitted with a 2mm diameter x 0.7mm thick sheave which I turned on the lathe :

 

Stanchions 001.jpg

 

I made the rails in two sections, as it was nearly impossible to accurately cut the square holes for the stanchions without splitting the timber :

 

Stanchions 002.jpg

 

Stanchions 003.jpg

 

Some time ago I mentioned that there didn't seem to be a forward support for the ship's boats - yes there is :) . The Spar Rack does this job - the boats are lashed to spare spars carried on the rack. The rack is the same width as the railings. They still need a finish applied :

 

Spar Rack 001.jpg

 

Spar Rack 002.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Companion Top

 

The aft Companion has a clerestory-style top fitted to it. Cutting the 2mm x 3mm holes for the Lights was a challenge :D . I cut them with a #11 Xacto and a tiny chisel, and bevelled their outer edges :

 

Companion Top 001.jpg

 

I "glazed" the lights with strips of very thin acrylic sheet, glued in with PVA. The corners of the four sections have been bevelled for a knife-edge fit :

 

Companion Top 002.jpg

 

Companion Top 003.jpg

 

A roof was cut from a piece of 0.6mm thick Castello and glued to the sides :

 

Companion Top.jpg

 

The assembly fitted to the deck :

 

Companion Top 004.jpg

 

Companion Top 005.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Beautiful work Danny . I looked at HobbyMill and noticed they have finished the masting package , that's a bugger .

 

David

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Forecastle Railing and Spar Rack

 

 

I made the rails in two sections, as it was nearly impossible to accurately cut the square holes for the stanchions without splitting the timber :

 

 

 

So THAT'S how it's done !!! 

Thanks again, Danny. Will add that one to the memory banks for later on.

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Dear Danny,

Your work is really perfect. The highest level of the details and quality of your work make a great impression and it is very inspirational. I love the belfry! B)

Keep up and have a great time
Doris

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Thanks for looking in again, and the kind comments John, Ben, Pat, Sherry, David, David, Grant, Steve and Doris. I appreciate it :) .

 

Ship's Wheel

 

Making the Ship's Wheel is one of the most challenging, but FUN, parts of the whole Build. I used some of the method shown in TFFM, with some other ideas of my own. I used English Box, as some of the 32 parts are very thin and needed the best timber available.

 

First I turned up the 10 Spokes. These were done using the Digital Readout on the lathe. If I'd failed with these then I'd have had to look at "Plan B" - buying a ready-made wheel. The only "failure" I had was with the first one .... I wasn't happy with the thickness of the handpiece (too thin). Version 2.0 looks better  :

 

Wheel 002.jpg

 

I started by making a "building block" from a piece of 10mm thick Pear. The Rim of the wheel is 3" thick, whereas the Hub is 5" thick, so I turned out the centre portion 1" deeper to allow the hub to be centralised in the wheel (measurements are "real life"). After marking out the limits of the rim I cut and glued the hub to the block, and also the 10 segments of the rim. I used PVA to glue the pieces to the block but Epoxy to glue the segments of the rim together, for reasons which will become apparent later on :

 

Wheel 001.jpg

 

Next I turned the rim and hub to size :

 

Wheel 003.jpg

 

Wheel 004.jpg

 

Leaving the block in the chuck I transferred the unit to the Mill, and cut the 10 slots for the spokes with the aid of my Indexing Attachment :

 

Wheel 007.jpg

 

Wheel 008.jpg

 

Continued next Post ....

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I've not looked in for a long time and all I can say is WOW Danny, she is really beautiful, your craftsmanship is simply amazing.

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..... Continued

 

(Thank you Geoff and Caroline)

 

The unit after milling the slots. I must have miscalculated one of the cuts, but I later managed to correct it by cutting and gluing tiny portions of wood back in. The repair turned out invisible :) :

 

Wheel 009.jpg

 

The spokes needed the sections where they join the hub and rim squared off, and also reduced in thickness to keep the spokes central :

 

Wheel 010.jpg

 

The first three spokes glued in. I used CA for a temporary fix to keep them aligned :

 

Wheel 011.jpg

 

After gluing in all the spokes I cut another 10 thin segments of the rim and hub and Epoxied them on. Then it was back into the lathe to trim them down. The pic below is how they came off the lathe before cleaning up :

 

Wheel 013.jpg

 

Cleaned up with a very sharp Xacto :

 

Wheel 014.jpg

 

Last step, and the scariest :huh:  , was to soak the unit in Isopropyl Alcohol to soften the PVA which attached the wheel to the block. I held my breath when I started removing it, but ..... SUCCESS :D :D :

 

Wheel 015.jpg

 

A little bit of final cleaning up is still needed after the alcohol has fully evaporated.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Brilliant work Danny. I looked at the info on the wheel in the FFM and couldn't imagine how it could be done - you have proved it can be with the right tools and very good skills. The skylight is a treat too. I'm going to have a go at the same for Fly but don't fancy my chances at 1:64.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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