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Dan Vadas

HMS Vulture 1776 by Dan Vadas - 1:48 scale - 16 gun "Swan" class sloop from TFFM plans - Finished

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Thanks for passing your vast knowledge,your logs always leave me in awe,truly a one man band,a learning encyclopedia which many modelers ,scratch or kit surely appreciate.Edwin.

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Thanks Theo, John, John, Nils and Edwin.

 

Check your digital verniers - the official diameter of a five cent coin is 19.41 mm!

 

 

Picky, picky ..... :D

 

Quarterdeck Ladderway

 

The last ladderway to be made and fitted is the one for the quarterdeck. This would need to have been removed any time the lower capstan would have been in use.

 

I made it in similar fashion to all the previous ones :

 

Quarterdeck Ladderway 001.jpg

 

Quarterdeck Ladderway 002.jpg

 

Quarterdeck Ladderway 003.jpg

 

Quarterdeck Ladderway 005.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Brilliant work as ever Danny.

Just when I thought it couldn't get any better you knock up a ships wheel! Inspirational stuff.

Great to see something next to a coin I can relate to for scale.

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Thank you Russel, Timmo and Kevin.

 

Just when I thought it couldn't get any better

 

 

Well how about this then Timmo :D ?

 

Ladderway Railings

 

The Stanchions for the railings are turned from 1.2mm brass wire. They taper from 0.7mm at the top to 1mm at the bottom. The lugs that hold the railings are made from a couple of spare chain links (left over from the pump chains). They are silver soldered to the stanchions - a bit tricky to hold in position, as the double ones are only 1.6mm long and the singles are 0.8mm :) :

 

Ladderway Railings 001.jpg

 

Here's the coin again - the stanchions are 18mm long :

 

Ladderway Railings 002.jpg

 

Ladderway Railings 003.jpg

 

Fitted to the ship :

 

Ladderway Railings 005.jpg

 

Ladderway Railings 006.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Well done on those double-ring stanchions, Dan. Having done them myself, with much cursing, I know just how tricky they can be! Your solution looks great.

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Those stanchions are incredible.  I will definitely refer to your technique when I eventually get to this point.

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Thanks go out to Tim, David, John, Mark, Joe, Patrick, David, Druxey, Michael, Toni and Popeye. I surprised myself with how successfully the railings turned out too :D .

 

Toni, next time I need to do some of this micro-soldering I'll make sure to document my method. It involves a block of Pumice stone to support the tiny rings.

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork

 

The Quarterdeck Breastwork was made in similar fashion to that on the Forecastle, with a few differences. The stanchions each have two sheaves (2.5mm diameter) instead of one, and there is a second rail.

 

Here's a pic of the setup I used in the lathe to make the 10 sheaves. Because of the small diameter of the brass wire I had to work very close to the chuck. This setup minimized the steps needed - I made the sheaves one at a time and parted them off as I went, moving the stock for each one.

 

The hole was drilled first, then I used the Parting Tool to score the wire to prevent it slipping sideways. The groove was cut next, and finally I finished parting the piece off. It took about an hour to set everything up and cut the 10 sheaves :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 002.jpg

 

The five stanchions were turned using the DRO - they turned out identically :) . The slots for the sheaves were cut in the Mill using a broken 0.8mm drill, going 1mm deeper with each cut :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 003.jpg

 

The sheaves were fitted, and the stanchions cut to length. There is a tiny difference in the angle of the bottom of each to allow for the roundup in the deck :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 004.jpg

 

I used a scraper to cut the molding into the edges of a long piece of stock for the rails. Then I marked out and cut the square holes for the stanchions on the Byrnes saw. As I did for the forecastle railing a second piece was glued to the other edge to get the rail to the right width :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 005.jpg

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 006.jpg

 

I used some 1.5mm bamboo pegs to secure the two outer stanchions to the deck and clamped the rail into place :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 007.jpg

 

After a coat of Minwax :

 

Quarterdeck Breastwork 010.jpg

 

This concludes Chapter 10 of "The Fully Framed Model - HMN Swan Class Sloops 1767-1780" Volume 2.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Fantastic Danny! I love the way you have done the sheaves - I must try that method next time I need some. Can you just clarify for me how you cut the groove on June sheave. Was that with the "normal" cutting tool, with the parting-off tool used for separating the individual sheaves from the stock, or did I get that mixed up?

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 Thanks Pat :) .

 

Fantastic Danny! I love the way you have done the sheaves - I must try that method next time I need some. Can you just clarify for me how you cut the groove on June sheave. Was that with the "normal" cutting tool, with the parting-off tool used for separating the individual sheaves from the stock, or did I get that mixed up?

 

You got it right Grant. I set both the "normal" tool and the parting tool to the distance apart that allowed me to just use the "X" axis wheel to cut both without moving the "Y" axis. The sheave is 0.7mm thick.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Thank you Remco. I'm still a LONG way off thinking about masts yet Brian :huh:  .

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Posts and Railings

 

The last of the Posts and Railings. The railings have an "S" bend in them to allow for the differences in widths of the gangway :

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 002.jpg

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 003.jpg

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 005.jpg

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 006.jpg

 

There is a strap which both reinforces the railing and gives an extra handhold :

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 007.jpg

 

Fixed Gangway Newel Post and Railing 008.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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There is a strap which both reinforces the railing and gives an extra handhold :

 

 

:cheers:  Danny

 

To me, that strap looks completely out of place Danny. I'm sure it's meant to be there but . . . well, it just looks wrong.    :(

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Thank you Nils.

 

To me, that strap looks completely out of place Danny. I'm sure it's meant to be there but . . . well, it just looks wrong.

 

 

I agree with you Yambo - it DOES look wrong in the pics (much better in real life), but it IS supposed to be there :) .

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Hello Dan, those iron straps do look like hot hammered iron, hammered to the required thickness by an experienced iron worker.  i.e. they look authentic !!  That was not an uncommon practice in those days, many other parts were made from wrought iron.

One of my trade certificates is smithing and iron work.

 

Cheers,

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Hello Dan, those iron straps do look like hot hammered iron, hammered to the required thickness by an experienced iron worker.  i.e. they look authentic !!  That was not an uncommon practice in those days, many other parts were made from wrought iron.

One of my trade certificates is smithing and iron work.

 

Cheers,

I would have to say the same thing.  Are you using pixie blacksmiths to do your straps?

David B

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