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TBM3 Avenger by CDW - Trumpeter - 1:32 scale

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27 minutes ago, Egilman said:

The only thing I could suggest would be if you want a more combat used look, oil stains, tire marks through oil stains footprints, etc, etc... and maybe a bit of assorted patches of whitening/lightening to represent a faded deck...

 

Like Egilman says, a dirty wash of some kind would give it a more used look. And some tire scuffs. Even our parking areas has scuffs and fluid spills (oils, fuel, whatever) The deck is too clean.

 

That being said, I do like the overall look.

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16 hours ago, Canute said:

Like Egilman says, a dirty wash of some kind would give it a more used look. And some tire scuffs. Even our parking areas has scuffs and fluid spills (oils, fuel, whatever) The deck is too clean.

 

That being said, I do like the overall look.

I think I leave it as is looks fine just like it sits.The process of staining the the deck any is going to lead back to the plane to give the whole picture harmony. ;) Kevin

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1 hour ago, Javlin said:

I think I leave it as is looks fine just like it sits.The process of staining the the deck any is going to lead back to the plane to give the whole picture harmony. ;) Kevin

It looks absolutely beautiful.... Nothing done at this point is going to change that....

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Wow!  she looks great sitting on deck  :)   should it be facing with the deck lines though and not diagonally?   envisioning the deck lines escape me.......I may be thinking of something else.   but other than some of the suggestions given,  I wouldn't change a thing.........congratz on a model well done! :) 

 

unrelated:   have you seen the movie Midway?  great carrier shots in it.

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20 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

should it be facing with the deck lines though and not diagonally? 

That's a fascinating question.
From photos of parked a/c, they were generally kept parking parallel to the long axis of the deck.  And the tie down rails run perpendicular to that.

 

Angled parking really does not come around until angled flight decks necessitate keeping the Flight Ops area clear (and adopting tricycle landing gear meant being able to park TOW, Tail Over Water).

Also, a tow tractor is only going to be able to use a single bar to the tail wheel, or a V bar to the main mounts, so squaring the a/c up makes sense from that.

 

But, is that good modeling?  

 

Aye, there's the rub, Horatio.

 

Really, any static USN a/c not on tarmac ought to be trussed in tie down chains and with chocked wheels.  (The Plane Captain, in his brown shirt, has to be able to show his trophies to the Aviator before flight.)

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54 minutes ago, CapnMac82 said:

Angled parking really does not come around until angled flight decks necessitate keeping the Flight Ops area clear

I beg to differ.... In the foreground, Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats of VF-3 “Felix the Cat” are parked on the flight deck of the USS Saratoga. In the background, Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless and Douglas TBD-1 Devastator aircraft are pictured. (U.S. Navy Photograph.)

Sometime mid to late '42 I take it based upon the aircraft on board and their insignias.... Circle star with red center dot on the dauntless's and Circle star without the center dot on the wildcats....

VF-3-Felix-the-Cat.jpg

Looks like angled parking, lashed down to me....

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Launching a massive airstrike off a straight deck carrier looked like a zoo. How many a/c were there on 1 ship. 90 or so?  They'd jam them in anyway they could  to make them all fit for launch.  They had to launch in a sequence, usually fighters first to provide air cover, scout dive bombers next and finally, the torpedo bombers. The rendezvous to build the whole strike package must have been incredible, getting separate carriers' aircraft joined up.

 

I remember our Linebacker launches from Korat in 1972, Over 100 aircraft from just one base. We had 4 bases launching. We had flow plans with all sorts of timing. Aircraft were parked all over the base; anywhere we had space to load and launch. We all launched to a fleet of aerial tankers and hung on them until the code word for executing the strike or weather cancelling was broadcast.

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I have been rereading a book about the air war in Korea.  In that case, attack aircraft - Corsairs and AD’s were propeller driven and the fighters were jets-F9F Panthers.  The launch sequence was attack aircraft first, and the shorter legged jet fighters much later with the rendezvous taking place closer to the target.  In this case the short legged MIGs did not pose a threat until the strike group neared the target and only then if the target was near “MIG Alley.”  The book’s author also claims that the difficulties maintaining the heavy attack schedule accelerated the adoption of the angled deck.

 

Roger

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20 hours ago, Egilman said:

I beg to differ.

Fair enough.  However, those birds are all engines turning, wings open, too.  The ones in the back, still stowed are pretty neat rows.

 

That's back in the day, when you needed all the deck you could get to fly off, so, you wanted it "compress" the fore & aft length of whatever you were launching in those days before catapult launching became common.

 

But, I'm drawing off of remembered photographs and the like.  At SWO school they mostly told us carriers were dangerous and ought be avoided at all costs.  And that brownshoes were very silly.

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17 hours ago, Canute said:

How many a/c were there on 1 ship. 90 or so? 

From memory, Sara & Lex were 70 or so; the Essex ships 75 or 80, and that was chock full, flight & hangar decks to capacity.

 

And, as the old adage goes, there's no such thing as a "perfectly good airplane."  So, you can't get them all flown off. 

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20 hours ago, Canute said:

How many a/c were there on 1 ship. 90 or so? 

Depends upon the class of ship and the era...  As designed the Lex & Sara carried 90+ but that was back in the biplane days, in the 30's they carried over 100, but only 90 or so were flyable, they had the capability to store aircraft in the beams and girders near the roof of the Hanger Deck. The Yorktown class as designed carried 85-90 but operationally limited to 80 or so.  The Essex class could also carry 90+ as designed but later in the war as the aircraft became progressively larger and larger, they reached about 80-85 operational aircraft also....  as capnmac says flightdeck size was the limiter as to how may aircraft could be launched on a single flight op. WWII saw the addition of catapults which allowed more aircraft to be carried and launched in one flight op... But in general, 80-85 aircraft for a WWII aircraft carrier.... 75-85 for a Korean war carrier group. The angled flight deck did two things, it allowed both flight and recovery operations at the same time, and, with enlarged hanger decks, increased aircraft complement..... back up to the 80-85 they enjoyed during WWII...

 

Long about 1944, a design decision was made, the most efficient aircraft complement for an aircraft carrier for efficient air combat operations, it was settled at 75-85 aircraft, after than it was the aircraft carrier that adjusted in size to fit the aircraft complement it was going to carry.... The Midway class was designed on that basis, as was the supercarriers....

 

Everything on an aircraft carrier today is designed to serve the aircraft aboard.... everything else is secondary......

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3 hours ago, CapnMac82 said:

Fair enough.  However, those birds are all engines turning, wings open, too.  The ones in the back, still stowed are pretty neat rows.

Actually you look closely every single aircraft on that deck is turning prop... the other thing you notice, there are no flight personnel in the scene, aircraft captains and assistants are warming up the engines for the days operations... The TBD's usually did not unfold their wings until they reached pre-launch position as the second or third aircraft in the procession, they were the largest birds on the deck. They are angle parked on the deck edges to facilitate aircraft handling making it easier to advance to launch position....

 

That is a deck that was pre-spotted in the early morning for launch operations... They have been sitting there for over 6 hours, they needed to be run up before launch.  I have official US Navy image examples, (like the one above) of this from all aircraft carrier classes used during WWII, even the smaller escort carriers used this procedure....

 

Yes flight ops on a carrier deck is one of the most dangerous occupations anyone could work in.... In the wrong spot at the wrong time, they would be promoting your replacement.....

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