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Duanelaker

The Peterboro Canoe by Duanelaker - Midwest - 1:12

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1 hour ago, Osmosis said:

What method are you using for bending those beautiful ribs?

What has worked for me so far:

 

1) Boil tea kettle of water

2) pour water into travel coffee mug with the wood lengths standing up but weighted down with clip (so it doesn't float)

3) set timer kitchen timer for 5 minutes

4) wait mostly five minutes or longer, remove from water and slowly manipulate a slight curvature

5) place curvature into canoe and make sure the wood strip is in contact with the bottom and sides of canoe correctly

6) clamp with clothespin (any other clamp was leaving a dent in the wood)

7) let dry thoroughly (approx. 30-45 minutes to be safe - my woodstove keeps that room roughly 80F)

8) remove clamps and glue ribs and fingers to boat

9) repeat, repeat, repeat ( I was doing about 5 at a time)

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2 hours ago, Osmosis said:

What method are you using for bending those beautiful ribs?

One of the things I finding out about building model boats is that there are many good ways to do things. Modelers seem to find their favorite means of doing something through trial and error. Dave has found, at least on this particular model, that soaking the wood frames and clamping them until it dries works well for him in bending the frames. Many modelers use soaking and clamping successfully to bend wood.

 

I used an Amati plank bending tool to bend the frames on my Indian Girl Canoe. It's one of those tools that looks like a soldering iron with a big, piece of curved metal on the end. I would take a frame and moisten it with a dab of water with my fingers and then gently began to apply heat with the tool while a frame was laying in the curved section of the wood block that comes with the plank bending tool. I would continue to dab it frequently with a little water and rubbing the heating element over the frame while checking the fit of the curve frequently in the canoe. I used medium viscosity CA to glue the frame into place once the fit was close to the correct contour. You need to take care not to scorch the wood. Keeping the heating element moving over a slightly moist surface pretty much prevented any scorching for me.

 

My preferred way to bend wood, however, is Chuck's method of using a hair dryer for dry heat while twisting and bending the wood. This method worked well for me on the Medway Longboat. However, the canoe frames were too small with sharp bends for me to be able to hold them and bend them using dry heat. I preferred the using the plank bending tool method.

 

Bob 

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4 hours ago, BobG said:

 

My preferred way to bend wood, however, is Chuck's method of using a hair dryer for dry heat while twisting and bending the wood.

I forgot to add that I also use Chuck's method of using a small iron like a travel iron to bend wood too. If the bend has a curve with and a twist in it, I like to use the hair dryer method. If it's a more straight forward bend, I like to use the travel iron method which also requires wetting the wood slightly with your fingers before heating it up with the iron. Sometimes I use both methods on a single piece of wood that I'm bending. Whatever it takes to get the job done!

 

Bob

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3 hours ago, Duanelaker said:

I find it amusing a few weeks ago I said i would be complete by the end of the week...there’s more to these little canoes then one might think.

Ain't that the truth! 

 

Bob

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Did some canoeing on Ontario river with friends in Deep River, but completely missed out on the museum in Peterborough on my way down to Toronto. Did it exist already in 2007 ?.

 

The classical book on canoes is btw:

 

ADNEY, E.T.; CHAPPELLE, H.I. (1964): The Bark Canoes and Skin Boats of North America.- XV+240 p., Washington, DC, U.S.A. (Smithsonian Institution Press; reprint 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing Co., New York).

 

And a superbly illustrated book about Adney's canoe models:

 

JENNINGS, J. (2004): Bark Canoes. The Art and Obsession of Tappan Adney.- 152 p., Richmond Hill, Ont. (Firefly Books).

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Great Job so far.    Now the fun begins, as you can go in any direction.   There a lot of traditional design elements to play with on these Peterboroughs.

 

Wefalck,   The museum may have been there but maybe not in its new building.   It was a really fantastic museum though, highly recommend.

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23 minutes ago, Sailor1234567890 said:

I have moulds for a full sized version of that boat. I also build a different canoe (Redbird) in 1:1 scale, my biggest building accomplishment to date. :) Looks pretty sweet with all those little ribs in there. 

Cheers,

Daniel

Thanks Daniel!  

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Finished the last thwart.  I had to do it twice since I made it wrong the first time...practice practice.  I found holding the sand paper against different round edges on my granite countertops helped with the perfect contour.

 

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I also used my wood stove handle to bend my soaked wood pieces that will sit against the “deck” of the canoe...I’m hoping it dries in the piece so I can manipulate easier when I figure out how to install the deck.

 

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A little more progress...and I must say when I first finished the hull I was a little disgusted with the roughness, however she’s really growing on me..lol

 

I added the decks...which I screwed up but was able to hide with the trim that covered the seam.

 

B48FB35D-CBF1-46F9-BAFB-850D8E0AD1E2.thumb.jpeg.e3d531ab9cc9bd3cf5d6bf36a989d80f.jpeg

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I then worked on the coamings which I had bent the night before.  They fit quite nicely.

 

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I then installed the floor boards, which were tricky...I started with wood glue but ended up doing CA.  
 

56E732E0-9658-4649-AE06-D9FA3A7E5052.thumb.jpeg.6e64d1020b70b13397bb8b9f6a2be5de.jpeg

0A352C10-FBDF-409A-9854-0084FD675184.thumb.jpeg.9d4109c7bf37c92781e9928ee6859751.jpeg

AD5AF8B5-8E61-4A8A-9439-93ADA6112754.thumb.jpeg.2295bb449d0a4d266ddc85102eb87d57.jpeg

3B1ABB44-1D3C-4449-8DF3-9783D0EA14E2.thumb.jpeg.c3bd9777bfd07ba91f02db6f4f12496d.jpegI was curious what the best way to apply a small amount of CA is.  I like PVA best but I acknowledge that all glues have their space in modeling.  I was squirting some out on a plastic cup, I would use a toothpick to apply, but I’m not thrilled with it.

 

3E294D60-938E-4047-A4E4-9F7701F0949D.jpeg

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She going to be a beautiful canoe by the time you're finished, Dave. 

 

34 minutes ago, Duanelaker said:

I was curious what the best way to apply a small amount of CA is.  I like PVA best but I acknowledge that all glues have their space in modeling.  I was squirting some out on a plastic cup, I would use a toothpick to apply, but I’m not thrilled with it.

 

I have applied CA is several ways but mostly with a toothpick the I sliced on an angle to get a really fine point, and I have used a CA glue applicator made specifically for applying CA which looks like it has the eye of a sewing needle that has been cut in half so there is a small, metal, U-shaped end that holds a tiny bit of glue. I also have often used the point of a sharp #11 Xacto knife to apply a very tiny amount of CA into really narrow places like a small gap between two planks. I simply wipe up any excess glue quickly with a small piece of a rag or even my finger on occasion. If you use your finger...wipe fast!

 

Bob

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I was able to get one side of the stem and false keel...I think I got that right.

 

first I wet it, used the wood stove handle to manipulate the bend.  I then compared it to the plans, wet it again, held it with my finger where it needed to be alittle more curved and worked it over the handle again.

 

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78E9EA83-D417-48F3-9CCC-A4A8B56D2DBF.thumb.jpeg.d82c21827cc28b45ed2346590b33f6a7.jpeg

 

I test fit it and it looked good so I glued it with CA.

 

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I then trimmed it and sanded it to shape...not bad!

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Maybe I’ll get the other one on tomorrow...I need to retire so I have more time on my ships lol only 15 years till I can collect a pension 😑 

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31 minutes ago, Duanelaker said:

I was able to get one side of the stem and false keel...I think I got that right.

 

first I wet it, used the wood stove handle to manipulate the bend.  I then compared it to the plans, wet it again, held it with my finger where it needed to be alittle more curved and worked it over the handle again.

Well done, Dave!

 

Bob

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12 hours ago, Justin P. said:

Looking great.   I’m enjoying this build, makes me want to pull my documents out from when I built it and give it a go as a small scratch build.

There is a lot of satisfaction at building a small boat. We always strive for the large and complicated vessel and lose our momentum in the process, most of the time.

A small boat is easier built and can be very rewarding as proven by Duane's models.

 

Yves

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I got to finishing the stem and keel.  All that’s really left is the finish.  I’m not sure what to do honestly with the finish.  I have tung oil, and poly.  There is alittle CA so not sure what the impact will be.

 

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On 2/27/2020 at 10:33 AM, yvesvidal said:

There is a lot of satisfaction at building a small boat. 

 

Yves

I will admit I have done these smaller boats for a few reasons...

 

1) I had never done a wood model before 

2) planking intimidates me

3) don’t want to waste a 300$ model

4) my attention span isn’t so good

 

We will see what the future holds.

 

i do think that the support MSW brings to each log is helpful in making me want to finish each project, especially when things aren’t going as planned.

 

- Dave

 

 

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Super well done, Dave. Try a little satin Wipe-on-Poly on some scrap and see how you like it. My experience with Tung Oil in woodworking was that it took forever to cure but, then again, I'm no expert in finishing wood!

 

Bob

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