Jump to content
Ian_Grant

Preussen by Ian_Grant - Heller - 1/150 - plastic

Recommended Posts

Just recently started this kit after finally finishing Heller 1/100 Victory.  What a change from 18th century rig and cannons.  The decks are crammed with manual brace winches and steam-driven winches for halyards and cargo cranes.

 

Kit Summary:  Hull halves crammed across the kit box diagonal; I think they must have wanted to use the same box size as Passat kit. The stem and lowermost rudder mount were bent because the diagonal really is slightly too small.  Kit includes thermoplastic sails.  Kit does not include blocks, or any representation of turnbuckles for shrouds and backstays.  Aside from sprues holding the 5 decks (foc'sle deck, fwd well deck, bridge deck, aft well deck, poop deck) and some hatch covers, there are only six parts sprues four of which are identical - a very tiny pile compared to the 21+ sprues for Victory. The instructions are good for assembly, with many fine diagrams showing what goes where, but rigging details are sparse.  The good news is that Heller did not scatter the rigging instructions all through the assembly drawings but instead devote several drawings at the end to rigging: stays; shrouds and backstays; lifts and braces; buntlines and halyards. The bad news is that belaying points are in Heller's patented blurred microprint. Also the proper connection of Jarvis brace winches is not shown i.e. leading blocks.

 

At this point I must mention that Heller's engravers depicted the steel hull plates nicely, but they mysteriously disappear below the waterline. It bothered me enough that I bought Evergreen 0.005" sheet and cut it into plates which I glued on individually.  It looked like hell at first, but after some caulking (acrylic painter's caulk squeezed out of the tube via a very small hole drilled in the cap end to provide a very small bead) and painting it actually looks pretty good if I do say so.

 

I have joined the hull halves and painted the black/white/red colour scheme.  I have painted and washed and varnished the decks and I am busy painting various bits of deck machinery and steel bulkheads.  I need to attach it to a stand before gluing in the decks, though.

 

One question for anyone who may have built this kit:  there is a little auxiliary bridge off the after storm gangway with a second binnacle. Around two sides of this bridge there are rows of something similar to plant pots (?!) outside the railings.  They are hollowed out. They do not appear to be for something to glue into as far as I can see in the instructions.  Anyone know what they might be?  The only thing I can think of is, possibly, fire buckets?

 

I will try to figure out how to attach some pictures later; it's late now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If, dear reader, you are trying to decide between this kit and "Passat", be aware that the "Passat" kit provides both blocks and plastic shroud/backstay turnbuckles but no sails i.e. the exact opposite of this kit.   Further, the yard trusses are much more detailed (and fragile) on "Passat" than the simple trapezoidal blobs provided on "Preussen". Remember, though, there was only one ship like "Preussen".

 

You can read about the "Passat" kit here:

https://modelingmadness.com/review/misc/ships/ger/komapassat.htm

 

If you elect to build "Preussen" then surf on over to the site below for very detailed rigging inventory and an extremely helpful and detailed belaying diagram you can download:

http://jans-sajt.se/contents/Navigation/Modelling/R_Preussen.htm

 

I highly recommend Harold A. Underhill's book "Masting and Rigging: the Clipper Ship and Ocean Carrier" to aid in rigging "Preussen" (or "Passat" for that matter).

 

One last note: I just returned from a week's cruise on "Royal Clipper" which is a 440ft five-masted square rigger inspired by "Preussen" which carries 226 passengers and 106 crew.  It's an awesome ship to sail on; I've never had any interest in a trip on one of those "block of flats" cruise ships but THIS is a different world. I never got tired of watching them make sail, or coming on deck in the middle watch to see the stars and the sails drawing. Here is the ship:

2020_02_20_0028A.JPG.415571849cfdd7eee477d86337015708.JPG

2020_02_21_0015A.JPG.cd6597b0cc3bdcf64ee65527dd0543de.JPG

2020_02_21_0016A.JPG.7d53b1805951a52b143e0d648bd6fb1f.JPG

And here I am steering her (still in my bathing suit from snorkelling just before we set sail again), 5000 tons under full sail except courses and the fore lower topsail which was damaged in a strong wind and was sewn by the bosun on deck the next day. Sorry, no front views for reasons of internet privacy:

2020_02_16_0034A.JPG.0ab3db916935bf1df13f25fdf83635c1.JPG

If you are interested in sail, and I guess you are if you're on this site, consider a cruise in Med or Caribbean on this ship (note I have no connection to the ship or company; I just plan to do an Atlantic crossing on her next).  You can read about "Royal Clipper" and the company's other sailing ships here:

https://www.starclippers.com/en/

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to your pictures....cuz ya know...if there ain't no pictures....*It didn't happen*.   Heeheehee.

 

Clipper fan...even though the Preussen wasn't a clipper...….she's still magnificent.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto on the waiting for pictures. I'm fascinated by the twilight years of commercial sail in the 20th century -- looking forward to seeing this project come together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob,  I love your Cutty Sark diorama for the rudder replacement!  And your "Great Republic" scratch build is incredible.  I fear my efforts will seem simplistic to you, but here are some photos anyway.

 

Hull plates I added below waterline:

P1010192.thumb.JPG.86f50277a167b32140efb98067bfe7d1.JPG

P1010193.thumb.JPG.1afc1bb2fed688ca24bee2f85a4356e9.JPG

I taped the decks in place so we can see where we are going.  That's my serving machine in the background:

P1010194.thumb.JPG.e2f47eea94620044469a3c4f3420da3c.JPG

 

Deck close-ups.  This is the first time I ever used a wash and I like how it turned out.  But there are so many coats of paint and varnish I worry about gluing stuff down, especially the pin rails which will have stress on them when rigged.  Haven't painted the inside bulwarks yet. I think I will paint a white "waterway" along the deck edges so I can glue in the decks then paint the bulwarks without fear of getting some paint on decks. They call for the cap rail to be painted Humbrol #63 (same as all spars) but I may leave it white just to ease my pain.P1010196.thumb.JPG.b761a74a00158bd9bb8badc39f9f02f5.JPG

P1010195.thumb.JPG.0c942af4332ffbf3e3c95d4e8e72773f.JPG

 

That's all for now.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking good!!

I was also looking at the Meccano....🙂

 

Cheers....HOF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Yankovitch:  Not to worry, this log will continue until the bitter end.  I tend to go a while between entries as opposed to reporting daily details. 

 

I worked for a time on painting deck machinery.  The instructions say to just cover all winches, bollards, wheels etc with matte gunmetal grey, but that sounded awfully drab for the pride of the Laeisz fleet.  Instead I painted the machine "frames" the same green that I used on the bollards, and used tank grey on the "innards", just to accent them. Here's a picture of the wheel just in front of the pilot house on the midship bridge deck.

 

Incidentally, I wondered what those black round things were at the corners of the house until I noticed a line drawn in the instructions, with no reference. I realized the steering lines from the ships wheel pass round these swivels then go down through the deck in the slots just beside the aft ventilators.  Does anyone know if that would be cable, or chain? Thanks in advance.

 

P1010211.thumb.JPG.b1e879c27a4155d244c425d51c5e6ca9.JPG

Here are all the decks at the moment.  As I mentioned in an earlier post I decided to paint a white "waterway" at the edges of those decks confined by bulwarks to make painting inside those bulwarks easier after I glue in the decks. Capstan heads are all glued in but not yet the top with bars because they're fragile.

P1010205.thumb.JPG.6f800f254c0bc8734114db4072fe7b0a.JPG

Of particular interest to me are the Jarvis brace winches. The photo below shows Heller's rendition of the full set of five beside one of the cargo winches. Each of these 1/2"x1/4" machines has three pairs of brace lines emanating from it. Looking forward to rigging them **not**.  Also I want to add a shaft with hand cranks at each end from brass microrod, somehow. Don't know why Heller didn't provide cranks - the pumps and halliard winches have very detailed little crankwheels and such.

P1010212.thumb.JPG.a5d49b835b4157e06931a5150d7fd61b.JPG

 

 

I also had a go at painting the giltwork at the bow and stern.  This has given me the merest hint of what it will be like to paint all the gilding on the "Soleil Royale" when I get to her next. It is pictured below, not ideal but pretty good to naked eye.  I ordered vinyl adhesive lettering for the name "Preussen" in white letters aft of this giltwork on each side, and also the name and home port in gold at the stern.  Unfortunately I could not find sub-2mm letters so I will have to use the decal for her name in the gold-framed spaces which is too bad as I expect the decal will show between the letters. The order was from UK and it is certainly taking its sweet time getting here.....

P1010208.thumb.JPG.b0780f062af3df6751d4914e5dc0f47b.JPG

 

Getting tired of green and grey machinery I decided to start assembling the masts. First I had to try to reconcile Heller's basic diagram with Underhill to decide where all the stays and backstays attach.  I cut off some of the molded plastic eyes and drilled holes for copper eyes. Then I started painting the masts and lower yards, completely painted in one colour as in ships of the time (Humbrol #63 according to Heller, which looks about right.

It was a long and ongoing process:

 

                     Wife"What did you do today?"                   Me"Painted spars".

Next day:     Wife"Did you work on your ship today?"    Me"Yes I was painting spars".

Next day:     Wife"Did you paint spars again?                 Me"Yes""

Next day:     Wife"Are you finished the spars?"               Me"Nowhere near"

 

There are many many spars on a 5-master.  My #63 paint seems to need four coats to give a consistent colour coverage.  To add to the pleasure, every one of the yards on this ship has five ejector pin marks to fill on the upper surface.  Could not Heller have put them on the lower surface , out of sight? Similarly, each topgallant mast has three of the same on one side. All these parts are each molded in a single piece so perhaps Heller were making sure they'd come out without warping?

 

I mentioned earlier that the Passat model has much more detailed yard trusses.  Here is a typical yard (as yet unpainted) from this model. Not a very realistic appearance. The mast has a tiny little semi-circular pin to engage the hole in the "truss".  I've decided that the risk of these attachment points breaking if I brush a yard while rigging is too high, and could be a nightmare to fix, so I am going to make some basic trusses from 1/32" brass rod.  Nothing fancy, just replicate the basic shape and not worry about trying to produce bolt heads etc at the swivel points. This stalled for a while due to COVID isolation until I discovered that my local hobby shop is doing curbside pick-up of orders so I just got some rod yesterday. I will do the same as on my Heller "Victory" i.e. have the rod inserted in a hole drilled in the mast, unglued, so the yard can "give" if I happen to knock it.

 

P1010210.thumb.JPG.a855dcf61646bb5d55153f0b5e2704a2.JPG

Speaking of rigging, this kit does not provide the rigging screws to tighten the shrouds and backstays.  I figured I would make something out of micro brass tubing and the ubiquitous 0.3mm brass etched eyelets.  I've discovered that K&S no longer sells 1/32" brass tube at the retail level.  One can, however, order direct with minimum 30 pieces at USD$3.60 each.  That stopped me in my tracks but I've since found tubing by Albion Alloys in even smaller sizes and plan to order from UK.

 

That's all for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2020 at 3:34 AM, Ian_Grant said:

I realized the steering lines from the ships wheel pass round these swivels then go down through the deck in the slots just beside the aft ventilators.  Does anyone know if that would be cable, or chain? Thanks in advance.

Hi Ian.

Steel-wire, cable-laid, 21 strands, 70 mm diameter in all, runs aft from the main steering-barrel in front of the chart-house, down from the Liverpool-House to the after deck over two rollers, mounted in these "slots", further aft then through some horizontal on-deck rollers to the tiller below the poop. And please don´t forget: 21 strands it has to be .

Cable-, not hawser-laid :-)

Gx Marten

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My stepfather had this kit - the hulls did not fit together so he sent away for a replacement. It has been sitting, unopened, in the attic (UK) for over 10 years, so if anyone wants to follow the above inspiring construction course, give me an offer! I see it is around the £100 mark so will accept lower. Ian_Grant: Mum and he were on the Royal Clipper for its maiden voyage across the Atlantic and they sailed on her a few times more, even paid for my sister to go to Mexico on her, hence the interest in the Preussen kit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/18/2020 at 8:18 PM, Marten said:

Hi Ian.

Steel-wire, cable-laid, 21 strands, 70 mm diameter in all, runs aft from the main steering-barrel in front of the chart-house, down from the Liverpool-House to the after deck over two rollers, mounted in these "slots", further aft then through some horizontal on-deck rollers to the tiller below the poop. And please don´t forget: 21 strands it has to be .

Cable-, not hawser-laid 🙂

Gx Marten

Cable-laid....21 strands....0.5mm scaled diameter....got it!   Thank you very much Marten!  So I need to make little rollers where the slots are, then the wires pass over the rollers, angle through the railing down to the after well deck, run along this deck on say two more pairs of rollers, then (a) disappear through openings in the poop bulkhead? (b) pass through more rollers to go up to the poop deck then go down through this deck?  I've seen such tiller lines on other build logs but didn't realize they would be routed like this on such a big ship.  Do you have a reference book detailing things like this on the big windjammers....I'd like to buy a copy.  Thanks again, Ian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/19/2020 at 7:22 PM, Marter1229 said:

Does the gluing of painted parts give you any problems?

I try to avoid gluing painted parts, but if needs must I use cyano glue on painted parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Emgee said:

My stepfather had this kit - the hulls did not fit together so he sent away for a replacement. It has been sitting, unopened, in the attic (UK) for over 10 years, so if anyone wants to follow the above inspiring construction course, give me an offer! I see it is around the £100 mark so will accept lower. Ian_Grant: Mum and he were on the Royal Clipper for its maiden voyage across the Atlantic and they sailed on her a few times more, even paid for my sister to go to Mexico on her, hence the interest in the Preussen kit

Yes. my hull halves were both twisted from being crammed across the box diagonal.  If you held the stem together, they both flared out at the stern.  I hoped they would cancel each other when glued but this was not the case.  After gluing, when I dry-fitted the forward well deck it did not align properly with both hull sides - there are little molded-in vertical "stops" in the hulls to locate the deck, as well as the horizontal support tabs. There was about a 1/8" offset(!), which could be corrected by twisting the hull slightly. When gluing I sat and held the hull securely with the deck aligned until the glue set up.  Same observation and procedure with the after well deck.  Even the bridge deck required some hull flexing to align!  But in the end it all turned out fine.

 

Emgee did your parents not pay for you to have a cruise on "Royal Clipper" too? Fair is fair!  I'd love to cross the Atlantic aboard her, east to west in the fall. One of these years, after covid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...