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Jack12477

M16 US Multiple Gun Motor Carriage w/ Church Ruin by Jack12477 - 1:35 scale - Tamiya / Verlinden - FINISHED

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Well, here at the Hermitage things have slowed down a bit while I try to locate all the landscaping supplies from my N scale model railroad that I stashed away in unlabeled boxes somewhere in the basement.  Can't run out to store since most are closed.  So far we are not under lock down, but since the Admiral and I are in the at risk age group we are limiting our trips out. So the rest of this build will be slow.  But I will continue. 

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On 3/16/2020 at 10:50 AM, Jack12477 said:

always wondered about those tires tho. A good marksman with a amour piercing round or a .50 cal round could easily take out all 4 tires on one side and disable the thing. 

The designers imagined that, too.

So, the tires are designed as "run flats" with radial webs to support the tire from the bead up to the tread.

 

They also have kevlar fibres in the tread and sidewalls.  Which part of the commitment to making both the LAV-25 series and the Stryker series to be proof against 14.7mm fire.

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On 3/15/2020 at 7:45 PM, Jack12477 said:

are a tank tread.

Rather uniquely, US half-tracks did not use individual track links.  Instead, they used a continuous rubber track with two steel reinforcing cables moulded within.  (This is entirely similar to the  tracks used on modern skid-steer vehicles and mini-excavators used today.)

 

It can be amusing to see US halftracks modeled with "rusty" tracks.

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On 3/16/2020 at 10:50 AM, Jack12477 said:

Floquil brand Olive Drab paint I notice that the Tamiya is noticeably darker

Used to be a matter of faith that the Floquil hue is AAC/AAF Olive Drab.  Tamiya chose to use a color more like 1950s era OD.

 

Armor modelers--especially those addicted to rivet  quantities--will get all exercised over just what hue is "correct" for War Department vehicles during WWII.

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In case you were inclined to go back and super-detail a bit:
The conical thing on the left-hand tailgate is a bucket held in place with two cloth straps (they would be "uniform" color); the bucket can be any color from black-green to galvanized.

The jerrycan straps on the front fenders ought to be OD fabric as well.  The US used a lot of fabric belts and straps, and not very much leather at all.

Tamiya does us a dis-service in giving us an "in action" set of figures and shorted us the loader, the very busy guy in the back keeping the guns fed.  Those ammo cans (known as "toumstone" cans to collectors of such things) hold only 200 rounds of linked belts, or about 15-20 seconds' of firing per each.  The loader would be a busy fellow.  Not only did he have to dodge the turret as it moved around, but also monitor the ammo, too.  When a can went dry, he'd have to dismount it, then heave a full can in its place, grab the end of the protruding belt and fish it into the at least warm gun, and run the charging handle three times. (First pull engages the belt in the pawls, second extracts 1st round, 3rd cambers a round.)

 

Havign to dance around the gun is also why the bottom guns were often fed with standard 100 round belt cans as they were easier to swing into place.

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57 minutes ago, CapnMac82 said:

Those ammo cans (known as "toumstone" cans to collectors of such things) hold only 200 rounds of linked belts, or about 15-20 seconds' of firing per each.

I was always surprised that .50's didn't come in "larger" belts.  We could put 400 in the floor mounted cans but we also had to string the belts together to fit them and while firing, someone (usually the CC) kept an eye that they didn't twist and were feeding cleanly.   I notice that while we jury-rigged our boxes, the latest -53's use one designed for the bird.

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22 hours ago, mtaylor said:

I was always surprised that .50's didn't come in "larger" belts. 

Yeah, it is decidedly counter-intuitive.  But, it goes back to keeping the cans man-portable, and also for balance on the weapon in ground and vehicle mounts.

And not binding up the trunions of the tripod mount with an eccentric load, and also not adding nn kilos of mass to the whole thing in ground mounting was a consideration as well.  The pedestal mount of the 53 uses a feed chute to keep from torquning the mount with a heavy box.  And centerlining the ammo box is better for a/c CG, too.

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37 minutes ago, CapnMac82 said:

Yeah, it is decidedly counter-intuitive.  But, it goes back to keeping the cans man-portable, and also for balance on the weapon in ground and vehicle mounts.

Ammo humpers are/were thankful for that.

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I know nothing about .50 rounds weight as I was not trusted to shoot something that could do that much damage, (even though I have shot an M-79 grenade launcher a few times) but I can say that a 500+ round box weighed in at something like 30 pounds if memory serves. May not seem like much but try hand loading two boxes worth on a hot day. I can only think that the same amount of .50 would weigh much more.

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While the Admiral and I sit in solitary confinement here in the Hermitage ;) I completed the staining of the base (cherry over basswood) and applied 2 coats of satin poly.   Did a first pass at weather the half-track and made a pass at the layout.  I had to use modeler clay under the Infantry soldiers feet to get the to stop falling over as soon as I placed them.  The entire base will be covered in an earthen material and other appropriate accessories including some oil drums, jerry cans and perhaps some discard ammo crates.  I am still trying to figure out how I want to represent any collapsed beams inside the church walls. 

 

But here's some progress photos

 

First the half-track

IMG_8013.JPG.1409ed08e95300fb3c0344fde9b4b347.JPG

 

First pass at diorama layout (could change)  I might change out the two "passengers" in the Jeep too. Maybe a guy manning the machine gun, if I can find a figure in my stash.

 

IMG_8010.JPG.0f41ecd851302494072bfe6a5de12a9d.JPGIMG_8011.JPG.64890676881d13929194c1e5d0d20d42.JPGIMG_8012.JPG.10a87b823c1fb9ce81c8d7c115aa65d0.JPG

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, lmagna said:

Wow Jack

 

That is some fast painting on all of those figures! Mine seem to be taking FOREVER!

Actually, Lou, they are from my stash of finished figures from prior kits that did not get used.

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No, it's a Verlinden model of church ruin in Europe during WWII. Francois Verlinden was a Belgian modeler who started producing very beautiful, detailed,  cast plaster, actually Hydrocal, kits of various ruins in 1:35 scale. He retired quite a while ago and his kits are still available but at a price $$$$$. I managed to buy two when my local hobby shop closed, actually the only two they still had.  

 

He also produced a lot of other accessories in cast resin. I have 2 of his accessory kits which are wood crates for artillery and small arms ammo, some Jerry cans, bed roles, tent traps, etc. He also published a series of books called the Verlinden Way describing how to do dioramas and super detailing.  There were several volumes.

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I'm very familiar with Verlinden, his items were always pricey, but well worth it....

 

The reason I asked was I was wondering the setting with a classic late '44 M-16 which is very well built and an also very well built M-151A2 MUTT complete with wading kit, and M-60 all fitting in the same diorama.......

 

M-16's were extensively used in Vietnam one of the best local defoliators around, so the MUTT isn't unusual in that respect, just wondering about the WWII setting...

 

Beautiful work on both  I may add...

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The MUTT was just a jeep I grabbed from my stash of finished models. I didn't pay close attention to its markings to tell which war it was from. The M16 definitely has 2 setsof decals for WWII, and also decals for Korea and "modern" whatever that means. I tried to match the decals to the previous M16 I built 30 plus years ago, also in my stash, choosing the alternate vehicle ID.  I can still swap things around on the diorama to get everything in synch time wise.  

 

I've been away from the plastic so long I have forgotten which era is which vehicle. Way back when, I was buying and building kits of each variant of a WWII vehicle. Of course in 20-20 hindsight I should have stuck a hidden label on the underside to remind me what war the model was from. ;)

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Well I just thought I would ask, I mean going through and doing a fantastic dio of a WWII collapsed/destroyed stone church somewhere in France/Germany would look strange with a late '60's jeep. The m-60 is what stuck in my mind....

 

Not trying to be a rivet counter and an M-16 and M-151 are entirely believable in the right context, but your builds are too gorgeous to make that kind of anachronism my friend.... (so I figured I should mention it)

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Thanks for pointing it out.  Appreciate it.

 

I have 3 WWII variants of the half-track, the M16,  the M3A2 Personnel Carrier and the M21 Mortar Carrier. I was going to put one of the other half-tracks together with the M16, until both the Admiral and my son said it looked too crowded, so I pulled a "jeep" from the stash to add a 2nd smaller vehicle without of course checking that I had the right war and theater. 

 

Guess I will keep the MUTT for something with the 4 variants of the M113 APC I also have in my stash

 

Thanks for the heads up.  

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Since I had all day to fiddle with this and laying down the ground cover is easy, I think I am just about finished.   Gotta sit with a few days before I say FINI but ......

 

Sorry if anything is out of focus I had to use the small pocket size digital because my really good Pentax DSL has a problem with the aperture control mechanism and nothing comes out with the correct exposure no matter what setting I use.

 

Now I have to find a place to display it. The base measures 11 x 14 inches with a height of church at 8 inches

 

IMG_8034.JPG.2fa39826eb71d841fbac3586c3660367.JPGIMG_8036.JPG.bce693f8b6279e44b7979bec7badede7.JPGIMG_8032.JPG.d8794f79af938a2aef112e2badbf2c2f.JPGIMG_8033.JPG.69e6f078721fbb17a9b8d116102c546b.JPGIMG_8037.JPG.d7a9c9e8b8f54b357dde489f22f65618.JPGIMG_8030.JPG.0c1e709a88ae4702cd87f9582dd6a24c.JPGIMG_8031.JPG.b9c6626be07dbb2fa7e91102414a8ea2.JPGIMG_8025.JPG.ed35605e2a7f82779183acdfa1011482.JPGIMG_8027.JPG.43118c1a434203e85fb513511dc0c702.JPG

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