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Diver

Medway longboat by Diver

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Thanks Chuck.  I checked and all the frames are correct.  The best way to explain this is the keel has a slight curve to port even when it is not placed on the frames.

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That is to be expected until you glue the keel on the frames.  You need to glue the keel on straight.   It will flex very easily......This is a very simple.....and predictable occurrence.     Just take your time.   In fact,  a good way to remedy this is to put a shim in the notch of the keel where the curve is to make the fit more snug.   Then when placed in position straight the snug fit will hold it straight.  

 

These are types of problem solving you will need to think about when building any ship model.   Keep posting questions and pictures as folks who have done this before will be able to explain the routine solutions for these challenges as they prop up.

 

Chuck

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7 minutes ago, Chuck said:

That is to be expected until you glue the keel on the frames.  You need to glue the keel on straight.   It will flex very easily......This is a very simple.....and predictable occurrence.     Just take your time.   In fact,  a good way to remedy this is to put a shim in the notch of the keel where the curve is to make the fit more snug.   Then when placed in position straight the snug fit will hold it straight.  

 

These are types of problem solving you will need to think about when building any ship model.   Keep posting questions and pictures as folks who have done this before will be able to explain the routine solutions for these challenges as they prop up.

 

Chuck

Thanks Chuck.  I will do as advised.    I do not want to be the crooked old man with a crooked old boat.

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Just remember to post pictures sso folks can help you as its really tough to do so without them.  You can even use a piece of tape to hold the keel straight as the glue dries.   

 

Try and keep the mindset that this is the farthest thing from "assembling" a model kit like a "Lego" set.   A kit like this is "built/crafted" rather than assembled.  And you will see many different and unique solutions to these typical problems that prop up along the way in the many build logs in the group.   I have given you just one possible solution...there are many others.  You could also try and straighten the keel with heat......

 

Chuck

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1 hour ago, Chuck said:

A kit like this is "built/crafted" rather than assembled.  And you will see many different and unique solutions to these typical problems that prop up along the way in the many build logs in the group.   I have given you just one possible solution...there are many others

This is so true. I remember being disappointed at first when a problem would crop up even though I felt like I was following the directions on a build very carefully. Then when I searched the forum for help I would find that people had many different ways of fixing a similar problem. You'll find lots of good advice on the forum but you will need to sift through it and choose to try what feels the best for you. You'll also find yourself figuring out ways of doing some procedures in your own unique way also. I'm beginning to do that more and more and, honestly, figuring out how to complete a step my own way has become one of the most satisfying aspects of this hobby. 

 

Hang in there and let us know how it goes. Good luck!

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Thanks to Chuck and Bob, and all others for the likes.  This is what makes MSW so special.  No judgement, and nothing but good ideas and support.  Thanks again to all.  Bob

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Bob, I goofed up on making the keel with the lap joints on my first try. I made a mistake of inattention where I drilled the holes and placed the monofilament into the holes in different places on either side of the keel. Everything was perfect except for 4 little black dots were not in the same place on both sides of the keel. My wife said, "Nobody but you would ever notice it." Well, it just bothered me and, although I could have used the simplified version of the keel, I really liked the keel with the lap joints. So I ordered another one from Chuck and made another keel with lap joints. There's always a fix and sometimes that means starting a task over.

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I believe my build is starting to resemble a boat.  I used heat and got most of the curve out of the keel so next session will be gluing the keel to the frames.  time sure flyes by in the shop.

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58 minutes ago, Diver said:

I used heat and got most of the curve out of the keel

Nice fix. Looks good!

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Looks like you got it nice and straight

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19 hours ago, BobG said:

Nice fix. Looks good!

Thanks Bob.  Quick question,  what glue did you use to glue the transom support blocks to the build board?

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17 hours ago, JToma said:

Looks like you got it nice and straight

Thanks Jeff.  Its coming along slowly.

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26 minutes ago, Diver said:

Thanks Bob.  Quick question,  what glue did you use to glue the transom support blocks to the build board?

I think I just taped them in place if I remember correctly. They were a tight fit to begin with so I just taped them.

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5 hours ago, Diver said:

Quick question,  what glue did you use to glue the transom support blocks to the build board?

I used Titebond.  I placed my support blocks aft of the transom to lock it in place.  Just remember that you have to remove the support blocks aft of the transom before you remove the keel and frame assembly after faring from the build board.

 

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Thanks everybody for the likes and support.  I have straightened the keel, glued all the frames, set the transom  support blocks.  When the glue has dried I will be ready to fair the frames.  The newbie question is what is the best direction to sand, keel to sheer, or stern to stem or a combination of both?

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19 minutes ago, Diver said:

Thanks everybody for the likes and support.  I have straightened the keel, glued all the frames, set the transom  support blocks.  When the glue has dried I will be ready to fair the frames.  The newbie question is what is the best direction to sand, keel to sheer, or stern to stem or a combination of both?

Ok, take my advice with a grain of salt until some more experienced modelers chime in. I think I read where it's best to start in the middle and fair the frames towards the bow and then the middle to the stern or visa versa but start in the middle. Use a sanding block or a fold of sandpaper that spans at least two frames at a time. That's what I did.

 

I think that fairing the frames is one of the most important tasks in the whole build. It sets the foundation for the planks. Keep checking the fairing often with a thin strip laid across the frames and look at how it lays. You want it to lay smooth and fair without gaps and bumps.

 

The trickiest part for me was fairing the frames near the bow. I think I took off a bit too much. Chuck says there shouldn't be any char left on the frames. I think everyone's boat ends up a little different. You just want a fair run of the test strip on all the frames when you're finished.

 

Good luck! 

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1 minute ago, BobG said:

Ok, take my advice with a grain of salt until some more experienced modelers chime in. I think I read where it's best to start in the middle and fair the frames towards the bow and then the middle to the stern or visa versa but start in the middle. Use a sanding block or a fold of sandpaper that spans at least two frames at a time. That's what I did.

 

I think that fairing the frames is one of the most important tasks in the whole build. It sets the foundation for the planks. Keep checking the fairing often with a thin strip laid across the frames and look at how it lays. You want it to lay smooth and fair without gaps and bumps.

 

The trickiest part for me was fairing the frames near the bow. I think I took off a bit too much. Chuck says there shouldn't be any char left on the frames. I think everyone's boat ends up a little different. You just want a fair run of the test strip on all the frames when you're finished.

 

Good luck! 

Thanks Bob.  I just finished looking at your latest post on your build.  You have achieved excellent results that I will strive to replicate.  You mentioned that you had traveled to Vancouver Island.  That is where I grew up and spent most of my life.  I married a girl from the east, so after many years on the west coast we decided to retire out here in Ontario.

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9 minutes ago, Diver said:

I just finished looking at your latest post on your build.  You have achieved excellent results that I will strive to replicate.  You mentioned that you had traveled to Vancouver Island. 

Thanks for the compliment. Yes, we spent a week camping on Salt Island off the northwest coast of Vancouver Island while taking a week long sea kayaking course. It was a fantastic week with the highlight being watching a pod of Orcas leaping completely out of the water as they were passing by us. You certainly grew up in a beautiful place!

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1 hour ago, Diver said:

The newbie question is what is the best direction to sand, keel to sheer, or stern to stem or a combination of both?

Like Bob, I also "start in the middle and fair the frames towards the bow and then the middle to the stern or visa versa but start in the middle".  I use nail files that I purchased from a beauty supply store. They are somewhat flexible and contour to the frames.  I have also made my own using 1/8" plywood, rubber cement and various grits of sandpaper.  I start with the 180 grit and finish up with 240 grit for the frames.  I use nail files for most of my sanding needs.  Just go slow and use gentle pressure as you do not want to flex the frames.  Let the grit in the files do the work.

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9 hours ago, Ryland Craze said:

Like Bob, I also "start in the middle and fair the frames towards the bow and then the middle to the stern or visa versa but start in the middle".  I use nail files that I purchased from a beauty supply store. They are somewhat flexible and contour to the frames.  I have also made my own using 1/8" plywood, rubber cement and various grits of sandpaper.  I start with the 180 grit and finish up with 240 grit for the frames.  I use nail files for most of my sanding needs.  Just go slow and use gentle pressure as you do not want to flex the frames.  Let the grit in the files do the work.

Thanks Ryland.   I will be off to the Drug store later.  They are still open during these trying times.  

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Rookie mistake.  I was all excited that I would be ready to fair the frames today when it became apparent that I had not seated all the frames to full depth in the keel.  I dabbed acetone on all the joints and have fully removed all the frames from the keel.  My question is about re-gluing.  If there is any old glue in the joints, will it effect the gluing process?  Thanks in advance.  Bob,   Haste makes waste.

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30 minutes ago, Diver said:

If there is any old glue in the joints, will it effect the gluing process? 

You can probably just take an Xacto blade and carefully clean off any clumps old glue that might get in the way when you reseat the frames. Otherwise, any residual glue should not present a problem when you regale the frames. I remember that a couple of the bow frames on my build would not seat 100% flush with the keel. There was a small gap there and it didn't cause me any problems. I blew up some of the photos on Chuck's build log and it looked like there were some very small gaps on those same frames so I didn't worry about it.

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3 hours ago, BobG said:

You can probably just take an Xacto blade and carefully clean off any clumps old glue that might get in the way when you reseat the frames. Otherwise, any residual glue should not present a problem when you regale the frames. I remember that a couple of the bow frames on my build would not seat 100% flush with the keel. There was a small gap there and it didn't cause me any problems. I blew up some of the photos on Chuck's build log and it looked like there were some very small gaps on those same frames so I didn't worry about it.

Thanks Bob.  I have the keel and all the frames cleaned up.  This mistake has not deterred me one bit from this build.  I am enjoying every minute of my time in the shop, even if it is repairing mistakes.  This episode has taught me a valuable lesson to be much more cautious.

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1 hour ago, Diver said:

This mistake has not deterred me one bit from this build.

As they say: It isn't the mistake that matters the most; it's how you recover and move on that really matters. Good job!

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Spent the evening fairing the port side of the boat.  I am happy with most of it but am wondering if that last bit of char on the transom will be a problem.  I laid a batten along the frames and it appeared  to lay flat all the way along.  Thanks in advance,   Bob

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2 hours ago, Diver said:

I am happy with most of it but am wondering if that last bit of char on the transom will be a problem.

I would finish fairing the last bit of the transom where the laser char is, especially at the top of the transom where the "ears" are.  It appears that the aft portion of that area needs more taken off near the ear.  It may be the photo, but the transom edges look somewhat flat instead of angled.  You have done a good job on the fairing and it looks like you have reinforced the bulkhead tabs nicely.  This definitely helped keeping the bulkheads from splitting. I can tell this is going to turn out to be a nice build.

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Good day everyone.  I had a good morning in the shop and have finishes the fairing.  All the char is gone.  I will start with the tick strips later for laying  out of the planks.  Am looking forward to this exercise.  I have a question about gluing the planks.  I am a 100 miles from the nearest Hobby shop, and they are probably in lock down.  The only source I have for glue is the Hardware store I work at and we carry Gorila glue (CA) and Crazy glue.  Are either of these acceptable?  Thanks in advance and please stay safe.  Bob 

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I used CA so it should be fine.

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27 minutes ago, Diver said:

we carry Gorila glue (CA) and Crazy glue.  Are either of these acceptable? 

I used medium viscosity CA for the planking and it worked well for me and I believe that Gorilla Glue is medium viscosity. Chuck uses CA when planking.

 

Just uses a small dot of CA on a couple of frames at a time as you move along laying down the plank after you have got it shaped and dry fitted so that it lays naturally where you want it. Check the plank as you are test fitting it to see if there are gaps between it and the previous plank. If so, bevel the upper, inner edge of the plank very slightly where necessary and keep checking the fit until you get a nice, clean fit against the previous plank. That's the key; get the plank to lie naturally and cleanly in place before you carefully use CA to glue it in place. Good luck! 

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