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Hi all,

 

I'm researching the anchors for my Oneida (1809) model, and it seems to be a transitional period for anchors.  Looking at contemporary models, most from this period show angle-arm anchors, but a couple are round-arm.  The Hornet (1805) sailor's model, also an American ship, is one of the round-arm ones.  Also, around this time the stock seems to have transitioned from wood to iron.  In Chapelle's book, in the appendix listing spar dimensions for Argus (1803), it lists the anchors to be with iron stocks.

 

It's probably my choice on both the angled or round arms, and wood or iron stock, but before I decide I wanted to get some opinions or info from anyone who knows more about it.

 

Thanks,

Ron 

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Yes, it was a technological evolution. The "folding" metal stocks came into service in order of size with the smaller ones being first. It was difficult to build the bigger ones until foundry equipment to handle it came on line. Weight was another consideration. A large ("bower") anchor with a wooden stock would be much lighter than a folding stock anchor of the same size. As on-board anchor-handling gear became capable of handling the weight, the folding anchors replaced the wooden ones because they were far easier to stow. 

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Thanks Bob.   That might explain why (as Mark noted) you see models with both, and on one I know of it's a smaller anchor that has the folding iron stock.

 

Being a smallish brig, the anchors called for aren't huge.  Chapelle says Oneida had one each of 1,500 lbs, 1,300 lbs, 1,200 lbs, 800 lbs, 400 lbs, and 200 lbs.  Maybe I will show the two largest as traditional angle-armed, wood stocked anchors, and show 1 or 2 of the smaller anchors as round-armed, iron-stocked; folded and stowed. 

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The first British Round crown anchor was cast in 1813 but only 14 had been issued up to September 1815 (The Arming and Fitting of English ships of war - Brian Lavery)

 I know little of American practice, but the French and Dutch had introduced the Round Crown anchor in the late 18th century,  so it's something that perhaps the American Navy introduced before the British.

 

B.E.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for the info B.E.  The round-crown or -armed anchor does seem to have been adopted earlier by the other navies.  I like the look of the angled crown anchors better!

 

I'm continuing to research this question, with some concern about how many anchors I really want to build (2, 3, 4?), not to mention how to make them.  Wood, painted or stained black? (That one is almost a non-starter for me.)  Cut out of brass, soldered and blackened?  Cast pewter and blackened?   I'm leaning toward the last method.  It would give me an opportunity to learn a new skill (though has a much higher cost as I have none of the equipment!), and I think it will be easier to make the mold originals out of wood and cast them, than to fabricate multiple brass anchors.  I could also cheat and cast two  alike for the 1500 lb and 1300 lb  anchors.  Better yet, I say the 1500 lb anchor is stowed below, and the 1300 lb and 1200 lb anchors are close enough to cast the same and show on the model.  Hmm. I'm not sure my conscience will allow that.

 

Ron 

Edited by rlb
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15 minutes ago, rlb said:

I think it will be easier to make the mold originals out of wood and cast them, than to fabricate multiple brass anchors.

The easiest way to go would probably to make your patterns out of "dental" or "jewelers'" wax.  The wax is easy to work and a mold made from a wax pattern can be used to make a run of identical pieces. Ask your dentist who does their dental lab work, or find a jeweler who casts jewelry. Make friends with anybody in those two fields and they can do the mold making and casting for you pretty reasonably, I'd think. It's no different than making a tooth crown, although you'd use a less precious metal. The problem with wood patterns, especially small ones, is getting them out of the mold. With wax, a ceramic material is poured all over the wax pattern (which would have a sprue and riser, as need be, and when the ceramic material was fired in the kiln, the wax pattern would simply vaporize and you're left with a good mold for casting. That said, cutting an anchor out of sheet brass with a jeweler's saw and silver soldering the palms on isn't really any big deal.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Bob.  Now I have a lot to think about!  The wax/ceramic method sounds pretty involved (now I have to find a kiln, or someone to do the casting!), not sure I'm up to that.  The brass sheet is definitely do-able, and I already have everything I need. 

Edited by rlb
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Rib,  This video may be of some interest to you.   High temp silicone molds are easy to make.   I have used pewter and melted it with a propane torch directly in a ladle so costs of equipment are negligible.      You can also forgo the pewter or similar casting metal and use  two part resin with most any silicone mold that you make.  There are dyes that you can get to make the resin black before pouring.    Would not have to be a high temp version.   Allan

 

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