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Hi Craig, fascinating thread.  One Lapwings near-sisters, HMS Bramble, is also of considerable interest to Australian maritime history (as you probably know), she served a long time on the Australia Station and did a lot of survey work in tropical waters.  Bramble Cay on the Great Barrier Reef is named after her.  Interestingly, the NMM in Greenwich has a plan showing her rigged as a schooner, and the ANMM in Sydney has an 1849 painting by Oswald Brierly showing her in the Louisiades, also rigged as a schooner and a close match to the NMM plan. But the Greenwich NMM also has a painting reputedly showing her rigged as a cutter.

 

 

Bramble 1822.jpg

HMS Bramble.jpg

HMS Bramble.jpg

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G'day Tony,

12 minutes ago, Tony Hunt said:

(as you probably know)

Actually, I didn't. I haven't delved very deeply into all the sisters, half-sisters, cousins and nieces, there's too many.

 

Cutter then Schooner is the way I see it, the Cutter painting is dated 1840 and the sailplan 1841 so that works.

 

I guess I will have to investigate Bramble further.

 

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Post #30  - the top graphic - Body plan - aft - the new green station shape.

 

You should maybe recheck the location of the sheer point.   I see it as being too close to the preceding station.  There will be a bulge.

If you do use that shape, you may wish to leave the inside a lot fatter.  Otherwise the inside will have to have a scab layer to make it thick enough when you rasp the outer surface to get a smooth run. 

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38 minutes ago, iMustBeCrazy said:

G'day Tony,

Actually, I didn't. I haven't delved very deeply into all the sisters, half-sisters, cousins and nieces, there's too many.

 

Cutter then Schooner is the way I see it, the Cutter painting is dated 1840 and the sailplan 1841 so that works.

 

I guess I will have to investigate Bramble further.

 

I suspect you're right - she came to Australia in 1842 as a survey vessel and served until 1859 at least. She remained in Aussie waters though, and was sold in 1876 to serve as the lightship marking the Sow and Pigs, a very well known patch of subtidal rocks right in the middle of the fairway at the entrance to Sydney Harbour.

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12 minutes ago, Jaager said:

You should maybe recheck the location of the sheer point.   I see it as being too close to the preceding station.

It's certainly not final but I should have pointed out that whereas the others are every second station, as usually depicted, that one is station 15, only a single step from the preceding station (14). It's a bit of a guesstimate to try to fill in the huge gap between station 14 and the transom. Same goes for the first station at the bow.

 

If I could get out and buy some cardboard I would mock it up to get a better feel for the lines.

 

But, thank you, all criticisms and suggestions gratefully accepted!

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