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Yenikapi12 by woodrat - 1/16 scale - a small Byzantine merchant vessel of the 9th century


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On 7/19/2020 at 2:27 AM, woodrat said:

Thanks, Steven.

Some progress on the vessel. The framing is compleat. I have deliberately made the framing a little rough to match the roughly adzed appearance of the original. I think it would look odd if smoothly machined frames were depicted.

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The mast-step.The larger slot is for the mast and the smaller slot is for a supporting stanchion for the forward sloping mast.

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The mast-step timber is keyed into the frames.

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The first and third wales are in place

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Cheers

Dick

Now we are talking!!!!!    Really good decision.  We all have been to the same “process”. 

 

Good job

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  • 3 weeks later...

I was being a little naughty about the hulc, Pat, but, now that I have thought about it , it's not that bad an idea. I might give it a go soon.

 

I have now planked down to the first wale and will start on the flat bottom. Should be easy till I get to the trun of the bilgeDSCN1978a.jpg.f0dc9bab6c353529d16183a41518154c.jpgawaiting a stealer

 

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Cheers

Dick

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What can I say? As usual, superb work, Dick. Beautifully precise work on those exposed deck-beams, too.


Pat, Dick's been very naughty. The hulc has probably had more controversy over its form, shape, construction, than any other vessel. But constructing a model of one per the current academic theory - that it had no stempost or sternpost and that the planks were in "reverse clinker" (overlapped upwards) would be interesting.

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21 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

Pat, Dick's been very naughty. The hulc has probably had more controversy over its form, shape, construction, than any other vessel. But constructing a model of one per the current academic theory - that it had no stempost or sternpost and that the planks were in "reverse clinker" (overlapped upwards) would be interesting.

Continuing to enjoy your build Dick, and the temptation remains - I just have to be realistic about it.  I still have the Victoria to finish (just experienced a major set-back in researching her spars, finish a restoration.....) - well I am sure you know the story :) 

 

Steven - what can I say - naughty, naughty  Dick,  have you no shame? ;) ;)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Vaddoc, Binho and Steven. The consensus from the turkish archaeologists seems to be that it is likely to have been built in the Black Sea region. They also believe that the flat bottom was built first then frames added to the bottom. From this point the build proceeded as for skeleton construction.

Dick

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Yes, this seems to have been a common design - the Serce Limani wreck and other Yenikapi wrecks have the same flat bottom and sharp change at the bilge line.

 

The ones I've looked at (admittedly galleys, as this is what I was interested in) have alternating frames - every second frame (though the builders weren't all that consistent about their spacing) crosses from bilge to bilge. Every other frame is a pair that runs from keel to gunwale on each side. Together these two frame types provide good structural integrity. However, it looks like Yenikapi 12 was constructed differently.

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An interesting study by Helfmann et al. [May 2019 Journal of Maritime Archaeology 14(31)]

on mediaeval hulls looking at von Mises stress analysis of different hull types found:

"The FEA results from this study demonstrated that three critical interdependent factors determined the relative

strengths of shell-first and frame-based techniques: the number of transverse frames, the

number of longitudinal reinforcements, and their relative locations."

 

In particular they found that shell-first hulls were greatly stiffer than frame-first hulls UNTIL longitudinal stringers were added. The ninth century was a transitional time from shell-first to frame-first and the Yenikapi 12 showed evidence of both techniques. Longitudinal stringers were used.

Dick

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23 minutes ago, woodrat said:

In particular they found that shell-first hulls were greatly stiffer than frame-first hulls UNTIL longitudinal stringers were added.

 

Very interesting conclusion. Perhaps because in frame-first construction the strakes were fixed to the frames, whereas in shell-first they were fixed to each other?

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Dick, when I was building my Endeavour I tried using under car bitumen coating on the lower hull.  It went on well and dried to a nice even coating looking very much like a coating of 'brown stuff' - BUT, that was in winter :(, then along came summer, and while not making the bitumen slump, it got very tacky.  So, off it came - but the surprise was that were the tar in the coating had penetrated the gaps, cracks etc in the lower hull planking, it left a very nice effect that showed a distinct darker shade under and above the waterline.

 

Just saying :) - maybe a light wash that just darkens it while retaining the definition of your planking etc?  That hull is looking very good and as Steven says, it would be a pity to cover it.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/22/2020 at 7:03 AM, BANYAN said:

maybe a light wash that just darkens it while retaining the definition of your planking etc? 

Thanks, Banyan, I think I will just let the wood seak for itself. I have an aversion to stains and paint except under special circumstances.

 

Here is the hull with gunwales fitted and pinned with dowels. The centre plank is jarrah and different to the other planks on the gunwale. I ran out of wood. But it does show up the sigmoid horizontal scarf.

 

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Cheers

Dick

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32 minutes ago, PhilB said:

Looking great! I'm jealous of this wonderfully planked and framed hull. Will the frame still be visible once the ship gets a deck?

Unfortunately, once the ceiling planks, decks and half-decks are installed, very little of the frames will be visible. Can't be helped. I am debating whether to fill the hold with amphorae which were found in situ at the excavation.

Cheers

Dick

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  • 2 weeks later...
3 hours ago, BANYAN said:

Geeez, life is tough in the west, spare a thought for us 'pariahs' in Victoria still in lockdown ;)  :)  Great idea for the bread boat though.

 

 

 

cheers

 

Pat

Our hearts bleed with empathy oozing from our every pore at the thoughts of our southern brothers and sisters in thrall to Covid. The least we can do is have some more dip and another sip of wine. 😢

The Port Admiral did not want to release the bread-boat back to the boatbuilders, however, and tried to claim it as a gift. After a brief mutiny, It has returned to the shed for decking and rigging.

Dick

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  • 4 weeks later...

The ceiling planks are fitted but I left one side off in the cargo section to show the frames. The planks are clearly reused planks and rough as they would be regularly replaced with whatever was lying around the boatyard.

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This shows the removable bulheads in slotted boards. These are up against through beams to prevent amphorae shifting into the crew area.

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Cheerio

Dick

Edited by woodrat
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