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Yenikapi12 by woodrat - 1/16 scale - a small Byzantine merchant vessel of the 9th century


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The mast did not seem to have sufficient lateral support in the absence of mast partners. So I saw a solution to this as used in certain arab dhows and have incorporated it. It also simplifies to process of stepping and unstepping the mast.

 

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here is the lower halyard block. I have decided to avoid sheaved pulleys.

 

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Dick

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18 hours ago, woodrat said:

The mast did not seem to have sufficient lateral support in the absence of mast partners.

 

And the mast steps in the Yenikapi Byzantine wrecks seem to have been rudimentary at best - some not even attached to the hull!

 

18 hours ago, woodrat said:

I have decided to avoid sheaved pulleys.

 

Probably fair enough. Even the hockey stick may not have had a sheave, but just a groove along the top to guide the halyard, as I seem to recall your theorising in an earlier discussion. The amount of chafing from this arrangement may have been small enough to ignore in practical terms.

 

Steven

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On 2/12/2021 at 10:46 PM, woodrat said:

I have decided to avoid sheaved pulleys.

As justification for this , a bas relief from Portus Augusti in Ostia second century CE. Which indicates sheaveless pulleys on the forestay and hearts on the shrouds. Note the scuppers beneath each shroud with a rope suggesting that the shroud was looped through the scupper. I have included this on Yenikapi 12 model.

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Thanks John , Steven and Schrader. Most kind.

I have made the lateen yard using timber found in the local park. I was inspired by photographs of dhows which show that yards were not perfect machine turned bits of wood but somewhat rough and irregular. I suspect this was the case for this boat.

 

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cheerio

Dick

 

 

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A touch of brilliance. I'm sure you're right about the rough finish. I remember coming across a loom in a Turkish museum used in traditional weaving - it was as rough as bags, but obviously worked.

 

What kind of wood did you use? That gumnut looks like it comes off a marri. (We had a big one in our backyard when I was growing up, and I've always loved them).

 

Steven

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On 2/21/2021 at 9:49 AM, Louie da fly said:

That gumnut looks like it comes off a marri.

I think you are right. We call them "honky nuts" here. I made a cooking pot out of it. It is definitely the hardest wood I have ever worked.

Dick

 

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Of course they're honky nuts!

 

Takes me back to when I was a boy scout and we went to a Jamboree in Victoria. All us sandgropers had woggles [A woggle is a device to fasten the neckerchief, or scarf, worn as part of the Scout or Girl Guides uniform, originated by a Scout in the 1920s] made of nice big honky nuts, which nobody else had because they don't grow big enough anywhere else.

 

They hardly qualify as wood, though I don't know what else you'd call them. But I'm sure you've seen them after the weather has got to them; they are incredibly fibrous.

 

They also make fantastic coals for a barbecue - just keep on glowing - I've never tried mallee roots, but I think they must be similar.

 

Steven

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4 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

All us sandgropers had woggles

Didn't know you were a sandgroper ( a fond term for native-born west australians).

 

Yes Chuck, I will make stocks as well as 4 more anchors which will be tied down on the stocks on the foredeck, ready for use.

Dick

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34 minutes ago, woodrat said:

Didn't know you were a sandgroper ( a fond term for native-born west australians).

 

Strictly, I'm a crow-eater - I was born in South Australia when my parents were over there for work,  but I got out of by the time I was two and grew up in Attadale, so I regard myself as a West Australian.

 

Steven

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