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HM Cutter Lady Nelson by whadozer - Amati Victory Models - Scale 1:64


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Posted (edited)

After completing some plastic model kits, I decided I needed to try a wooden model. Internet research pointed me to the Lady Nelson by Amati and I'm really happy with the quality of materials and clarity of instructions. Much better than the plastic model kits! This was a challenge for me also because I have no real woodworking experience at all, but I'm really loving it so far.

 

I started this several weeks ago and only recently decided to join the forum, so most of the woodworking, finishing, and painting is out of the way, but to catch you up:

 

I mostly followed the Modeler's Shipyard DVD that Amati has put online on their Facebook page. I found it to be a really helpful resource.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e30.jpg.23fd5e7e0e18ca4c280f18915f9a8038.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e45.jpg.9622af68b8010b57e574727e947867a6.jpg

I feel okay about the fairing job on the hull, but knowing now how planks lie I'm sure I'd take a bit more time and care with my next ship.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e4e.jpg.68a46ce1bebb1bc9efa9768c71a48354.jpg

One of the biggest mistakes I made was tapering the first layer planks from the wrong bulkheads, so there's a little bulge towards the bow. It didn't end up causing too much of a problem after sanding and filling.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e62.jpg.b8e60640ed40a52e7234c45c861ac4bd.jpg

Not very proud of the first layer of planking, but it was sufficient in providing a solid smooth base for the second layer, which I took much more time and care with.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2ea7.jpg.b2f6b9db21b026b8490eb0e2c9c1021e.jpg

The second layer went on like a dream. I was more careful with the tapering and also set up a rather crude jig to edge bend the planks with steam. I simply soaked the planks for a half hour and then used an electric iron as I bent them around the jig to steam the water out and lock the curve into place. I was a bit sloppy with the first two planks above the garboard plank (shoving splinters instead of spiling properly). I used wood glue/sawdust for filler, but WAY overfilled without removing excess and ended up sanding a layer of hard dried glue off the hull for a whole day.

IMG_3090.HEIC

I finished the hull with Tung oil, which was satisfying to say the least.

IMG_3079.HEICIMG_3086.HEIC

Here she is today, with most of the deck furnishings painted or stained and ready to be glued on. The masts and yards (which I had to taper and shape by hand) are finished and painted.

 

What I want to do differently next time:

1. Find better ways to make sure the false deck lies at the proper curve against the bulkheads. I tried pins but they were extremely difficult to get through the deck, and many of them came out while the glue dried. So the deck is less curved than I'd like, and the gunports don't sit at an even distance from the deck.

2. Tapering the planks from the proper location on the first layer of planking

3. Not overdoing the filler that I used between the planks on the second layer of planking (or just making the planks fit tighter), so as not to leave glue on the surface of the hull. I sanded most of it off, but the tung oil revealed some missed spots.

3. I used CA glue with the second layer, which was fast and convenient as I didn't have to do as much shaping of the planks. It was an okay situation, but next time I'll try using wood glue and pins, which will help me get a tighter fit between planks.

4. Break up the deck planking into realistic lengths instead of having them run the full length of the ship.

 

There's a lot more to add to this list, but those are the main issues I've run into so far. That, and just not having money or a car to go out and buy the tools that make things easier! Any constructive criticism or advice moving forward is more than welcome.

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

Edited by whadozer
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Have you looked around at previous builds of this model. There's a very good one by Vossiewulf ( although unfinished) that would be worth your while looking at. Easy way to hold the false deck down it using a number of heavy duty rubber bands.

 

Rick

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The other cutter that is very similar to the Lady Nelson is the Sherbourne. There are some worthwhile build logs you could look at, especially those by Sherbourne Tar, Gregor and dubz that go into a lot of the historical detail, the different ways or rigging and belaying, and modifications from the kit parts you may want to consider.

 

Tony

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Good job so far. As Tony has mentioned above there are some excellent build logs of Sherbourne which is very similar to your model. 

They could help if you're thinking of going off piste. 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for pointing me to those awesome builds - inspiring me to scratchbuild a few things. For the most part, I'm just trying to stay on the kit instructions and do things as cleanly as I can.

 

Since my last post, I've been working maybe 9-10 hours a day on this... as my normal gigs have been cancelled due to the pandemic, I have nothing but time. I find it tremendously enjoyable and have a hard time focusing on anything else. I've been working on the deck furniture and guns. Will start the gun rigging this evening.

image.thumb.png.b54188db3924428b1e01b07cf1d09e53.png

image.thumb.png.3862969b6eaf8977389bba96fa4b8b86.png

(The guns in the second photo are not in final position, they just slid around on the deck)

 

I think most things are going well. I'm unhappy with how the channel assembly came out. The PE chainplates were not long enough (the wales were too far apart, my fault), so I had to nail into the very top edge of the lower wale. That caused a little splintering and by the time I got the pesky nails in, I had lost the alignment I had so carefully lined out with the mast and some string. The placement also means the deadeyes are below the bulwark and therefore are going to be a challenge to rig.  The instructions aren't super clear on how things are supposed to be painted/stained, so I just kind of added some black in a few areas to indicate ironwork or whatever. Honestly, sometimes I just get lost in the enjoyment of the process and make decisions on what is aesthetically pleasing rather than historically accurate. I can only spend so much time on the internet researching! That said, let me know if there are glaring things I should correct :)

 

Some questions: What are good ways to remove CA glue overflow? What is the best glue to seal rigging knots? How does one get the fabric flags to drape naturally/to scale?

 

Edited by whadozer
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Posted (edited)

Your difficulties and questions show the value of studying other logs.

 

CA glue overflow is extremely difficult to get rid of. It stains the wood. I can only think of soaking in acetone which may necessitate removing the part. It’s worth avoiding by using extremely sparingly, applied with a pointed stick or the filed off end of a sewing needle.

 

For sealing knots nail varnish or similar is often recommended. Some use dilute woodworker’s PVA.

 

PVA can also be used diluted to stiffen fabric.

 

Tony

Edited by tkay11
'filed' for 'field'
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I've always used a dilute PVA glue on knots, likewise a very dilute solution used to soak the flags allows you to move them into any position you want. This is best experimented with beforehand to get the correct solution - sorry but I can't remember the ratios!

 

Rick

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  • 5 months later...
On 5/2/2020 at 6:22 PM, whadozer said:

After completing some plastic model kits, I decided I needed to try a wooden model. Internet research pointed me to the Lady Nelson by Amati and I'm really happy with the quality of materials and clarity of instructions. Much better than the plastic model kits! This was a challenge for me also because I have no real woodworking experience at all, but I'm really loving it so far.

 

I started this several weeks ago and only recently decided to join the forum, so most of the woodworking, finishing, and painting is out of the way, but to catch you up:

 

I mostly followed the Modeler's Shipyard DVD that Amati has put online on their Facebook page. I found it to be a really helpful resource.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e30.jpg.23fd5e7e0e18ca4c280f18915f9a8038.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e45.jpg.9622af68b8010b57e574727e947867a6.jpg

I feel okay about the fairing job on the hull, but knowing now how planks lie I'm sure I'd take a bit more time and care with my next ship.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e4e.jpg.68a46ce1bebb1bc9efa9768c71a48354.jpg

One of the biggest mistakes I made was tapering the first layer planks from the wrong bulkheads, so there's a little bulge towards the bow. It didn't end up causing too much of a problem after sanding and filling.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2e62.jpg.b8e60640ed40a52e7234c45c861ac4bd.jpg

Not very proud of the first layer of planking, but it was sufficient in providing a solid smooth base for the second layer, which I took much more time and care with.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2ea7.jpg.b2f6b9db21b026b8490eb0e2c9c1021e.jpg

The second layer went on like a dream. I was more careful with the tapering and also set up a rather crude jig to edge bend the planks with steam. I simply soaked the planks for a half hour and then used an electric iron as I bent them around the jig to steam the water out and lock the curve into place. I was a bit sloppy with the first two planks above the garboard plank (shoving splinters instead of spiling properly). I used wood glue/sawdust for filler, but WAY overfilled without removing excess and ended up sanding a layer of hard dried glue off the hull for a whole day.

IMG_3090.HEIC 1.22 MB · 43 downloads

I finished the hull with Tung oil, which was satisfying to say the least.

IMG_3079.HEIC 1.44 MB · 20 downloads IMG_3086.HEIC 1.47 MB · 19 downloads

Here she is today, with most of the deck furnishings painted or stained and ready to be glued on. The masts and yards (which I had to taper and shape by hand) are finished and painted.

 

What I want to do differently next time:

1. Find better ways to make sure the false deck lies at the proper curve against the bulkheads. I tried pins but they were extremely difficult to get through the deck, and many of them came out while the glue dried. So the deck is less curved than I'd like, and the gunports don't sit at an even distance from the deck.

2. Tapering the planks from the proper location on the first layer of planking

3. Not overdoing the filler that I used between the planks on the second layer of planking (or just making the planks fit tighter), so as not to leave glue on the surface of the hull. I sanded most of it off, but the tung oil revealed some missed spots.

3. I used CA glue with the second layer, which was fast and convenient as I didn't have to do as much shaping of the planks. It was an okay situation, but next time I'll try using wood glue and pins, which will help me get a tighter fit between planks.

4. Break up the deck planking into realistic lengths instead of having them run the full length of the ship.

 

There's a lot more to add to this list, but those are the main issues I've run into so far. That, and just not having money or a car to go out and buy the tools that make things easier! Any constructive criticism or advice moving forward is more than welcome.

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

I am doing a first build with Lady Nelson also.  I've done solid hull and masts and rigging on another ship, but my first time with planking.   I am really struggling with the first layer after putting on 3 planks per side.  I followed the Amati videos by Leon Griffiths as faithfully as I could but I seem to be painted into corner where th planks need increasingly more torture to get them to lie on the forward bulkheads.  I need a drastic correction somehow before I continue and can't see a way to do it without doing a plank that is pointeded at both ends.  The planks are clinkering at the bow.  A no-no, but I will do what I have to to get it done.  So the question is, your first layer seemed to need some "fixer" planks but the second layer is much more regular.  What fundamentally changed in your second layer approach?

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Searcher,

 

I'm in the same (no pun intended) boat, the Lady Nelson.  And I had the same issues you had with the first planking.  I was pointed to the definitive site videos  here: https://modelshipworld.com/forum/98-planking-downloads-and-tutorials-and-videos/ .  The key one is the 3rd I think, where Chuck shows how to edge-bend the planks.  It puts a curve into the plank that when bent in the normal sense, it lays right on top of the forward bulkheads.  Yeah, I also followed Leon, but after 5 x planks, I reached for help from the wizards around here.  They convinced me to start over, which I did.  I left the 1st plank on and edge-bent the rest of them.  And we will likely need to do the same for the 2nd planking.

 

I would also recommend that you go through Chuck's build of the Cheerful, which is close to the LN.  You can find that here: https://syrenshipmodelcompany.com/revenue-cutter-cheerful-1806.php.  There is a PDF for each chapter.

 

I'm just a little bit ahead of you in the build and you can check out my log.  I would recommend that you create your own log so you can post your own questions and not be lumped in with whadozer's log.

 

Good luck...John

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