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1 minute ago, Chuck said:

Run more tests before you even touch the model.  

Thanks for the input Chuck.  I'll slap a few planks on my broken frame and do a lot more tests before committing for real.  If I can't get a good look with the fishing line I'm just going to leave it as is.  The poly helped the joints stand out pretty well.  I'm happy with my result as it stands but want to give every new technique a try.  Finally a new purpose for my busted frame.

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Glenn, I had a tough time scraping the moulding for my Medway Longboat. I tried cutting patterns into brass, box cutter blades, and razor blades but I couldn't get a nice, smooth, scraped pattern from any of them. I eventually bought a set of Artesania Latina scrapers and, although they didn't fit perfectly because they are metric, I was able to finally scrape a nice pattern on the moulding.

 

IMG_3879.thumb.jpg.f1ef26d8b9c630e9420cf4ff7d412e07.jpg

 

 

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Adding treenails to my Medway Longboat was the most tedious task of the entire build since there were around 650 or more. I used black monofilament and the method that Chuck recommended.

 

I found it easiest to first cut off several hundred short pieces of monofilament into a container and then drill all the holes on one side of the hull. Next, using tweezers, I would pick up a piece of monofilament and just touch the end very lightly into some CA before carefully placing it into a hole while working under my lighted, magnifier lamp. It's tedious work.

 

The boat looked like a porcupine once I had a piece of monofilament in every hole on one side. Then I snipped off the excess monofilament with my side cutters but, as you noted, they leave a small protrusion of monofilament. I tried using a razor at first to cut them flush but that didn't work for me. So, once all the treenails were in and snipped off, I sanded the entire hull lightly and then added a coat of Satin Wipe-on-Poly. 

 

It took me a couple of days to complete just because the repetition is so tiring. Believe me, after a couple hundred, you get better at it! It turned out well and I think it looks great so it was worth the effort.

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10 minutes ago, glbarlow said:

That scraper looks great but no hits on eBay or google. Thanks for sharing that.  

Google Artesania Latina Micro Shapers (Shapers not Scrapers) and quite a few online sites will come up that have them for sale. There are two sets with different shapes and sizes titled set A and set B. Micromart has both sets but there are other choices also.

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12 hours ago, BobG said:

moulding

I ordered both from a US based hobby store, who knew those still existed.  I appreciate the reference to this and I’m sure others will as well. I have a brass plate and have fiddled a bit with getting a decent profile, I’m sure I’d get that to work eventually. “Bob’s moulding tool” should make the job much easier and with better looking profiles.👍🏻

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On 8/22/2020 at 8:06 AM, BobG said:

Glenn, I had a tough time scraping the moulding for my Medway Longboat. I tried cutting patterns into brass, box cutter blades, and razor blades but I couldn't get a nice, smooth, scraped pattern from any of them. I eventually bought a set of Artesania Latina scrapers and, although they didn't fit perfectly because they are metric, I was able to finally scrape a nice pattern on the moulding.

 

IMG_3879.thumb.jpg.f1ef26d8b9c630e9420cf4ff7d412e07.jpg

 

 

Glenn,

 

I have these scrapers.  They are good  but I find them far too big for the scale we are working at. I used jewelers files to cut a profile into the back of a annealed hacksaw blade. I think I might have also used a jewelers saw. There are several posts on this site about this technique.

 

John

 

 

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2 hours ago, bartley said:

find them far too big

I've ordered them, they'll be here Wednesday and then I'll see how it goes. I have brass plate (I've got a hacksaw blade and a razor too I can try) I've cut profiles with my files, but have not got that right yet. I'll definitely experiment with all the options to figure out what works. Thanks for the note, not happy to hear the scrapers didn't work for you, they seem like such a good option. I think anything on 1/32 thick wood is going to be a fun challenge.

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Glenn,

 

I am always a bit reticent about providing any advice here as I am a rank beginner at this game.  However, for what its worth here is a picture of my scraper and the result.  I think I used the one on the left or something like it.  I made about 10 of them in the end.

 

Cutter_MG_4455.jpg.3b1c2116c9d3f291d780b591a2eacbf0.jpg

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The few tests that I did with yellow cedar gave very indistinct results and it was only when I used boxwood that I could obtain a satisfactory profile.  I also stuck the strip to a glass plate on my bench with double sided tape to stop it moving. I found that several light strokes were best until the profile was established and then I could be more aggressive.

 

 

 

John

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—I accidentally deleted this post, reposting just to put a cap on the tree nail discussion. —-

 

After a lot of contemplation and with the input and encouragement from many of you I’ve made the decision NOT to tree-nail. I like the look of my hull  as it is.

 

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I put these couple of rows on my broken hull, put on some WOP yesterday with the intent to practice practice today. I sat there looked at it for a while and said - No thanks, moving on. And so I

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19933258_Post25-2831.jpg.d952949e73bb3b2aeb1b228613afe8d6.jpg

 

Before I get into starting the deck work I wanted to share the latest addition to my workshop, my framed print of HM Cheerful, a true copy from the UK NMM of the original plans. Note the matte color was selected to match my paint choice on the model. Cheerful joins a NMM print of the Pegasus on a different wall. It’s a bit high to get above the ceiling speaker volume control, but I’m out of other wall space. It looks really cool hanging there.

 

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Thinning the stern frames was the first frightful task, that one I avoided the Dremel sanding drum with the use of a jewelers saw (described earlier in the log). No such luck with the second frightful thing, thinning the bulkhead extensions and the port sills to a very thin 1/16th. So after convincing myself 1/8th wasn’t good enough I let the Dremel do its thing.

 

However, the near magical step I did first was to line the bulwarks with 1/16th basswood strip between and below the ports. Aside from providing some needed strength these strips marked exactly how far and and how much to take out from the neighboring bulkheads and port sills with the Dremel. This worked great in keeping me and the sanding drum where it was supposed to be and not go where it wasn’t. I’m not sure how I’d have gotten an even 1/16 without a whole lot more trouble, not to mention not gouging my way through the hull planks.

 

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After getting the majority done with the Dremel I finished off with my chisels at the base where the Dremel couldn’t reach and then sanded it all out even with my various sanding tools. I used 180 grit to get the last little bit of the 1/16th thickness and 220 to finish it out. Did I mention 1/16th is very thin. My 1/16th thickness gauge came in handy to constantly cross check what was left of the once thick port sills.

 

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A lot has to happen right along the way for this build come together. The port sills were installed very early using reference lines on the bulkheads, later an outer plank was run beneath them following the sheer of the deck. That had to be done with a 1/64th clearance for the rabbet (and I thought 1/16 was thin). I actually did ok with that. I erred on the high side with the original port sills (no more than 1/32) because I knew, and did on a couple, I could file them down to the 1/64th rabbet height.  Despite that I knew I had one port to address when I got to this stage.  I filed this too low port sill completely flat to the hull, added a 1/64th strip, cut that flush, and painted it. You’d never know it was too low now. Improvise, adapt, overcome.

 

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I faired the top of the bulkheads and frame to provide a smooth surface for the false deck. Skipping this step would have resulted in a bump near the stern frames and a rough spot here and there along the frame former.  It looks kinda pretty maybe I should just stop here. PS: I probably shouldn't have gotten carried away when I painted the counter and not painted the interior of the stern yet, kind of wasted work now.

 

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My process for cutting the false deck was to cut out the deck drawing from the plans, cut out the locations of the deck furniture and rubber cement it firmly to 1/16 basswood, and extended the center line through the openings. I cut it out with a #11 blade, the basswood was easy to cut, including the stern frame slots, skylight, and mast openings. It’s a tad confusing, you do cut out the paper to show the hatches and opening, but just on the paper (so I obviously did that before gluing it onto the basswood). Only the skylight and mast hole are cut through the false deck, the rest are place markers for other deck furniture.

 

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It was easy to peal off the paper, rub off the rubber cement residue with my finger and my false deck was ready to mount. I did have to do a little work to ensure it was centered, in addition to the dowel for the mast hole I jigged up a plug to fit into the skylight opening. Still not satisfied I cut little squares in the hatch openings (which I will cover or fill later). With the top faired there is a clear line down the center of the frame from the plywood lamination - the dark middle layer was perfectly centered, so I had only to match it up with the line I’d marked down the basswood. Now I won’t later be looking at off-centered deck furniture, at least not due to the false deck.

 

So on went the Tite Bond III, a coulple of weights to hold down the center, and plastic clothes pins to push the edges down onto the bulkheads, and not mark the outside of the hull in the doing.

 

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A lot of tools got me to this point. Here are just a few of them. I’m on to planking the bulkheads followed by the moulding strips, I’ll save those for the next post. 

Thanks for stopping by.

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1 hour ago, glbarlow said:

I wanted to share the latest addition to my workshop, my framed print of HM Cheerful, a true copy from the UKK NMM of the original plans. Note the matte color was selected to match my paint choice on the model.

I really like this framing. 

 

1 hour ago, glbarlow said:

A lot has to happen right along the way for this build come together.

It really makes you think many steps ahead.  Small errors can really add up and your build looks like you avoided them.  

 

I like those sanding foam blocks

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