Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi All

 

I'm coming to the end of my current build which is a steam powered Italian tug which over the past 3 years has turned out nicely.  I cut all of my own planks and parts and made just about everything in good old fashioned kit bashing style.  I've about 6 months left on it before its first sailing.

 

I joined this forum as I want to move onto fully framed ships built from plans and have learned much.  I have learned that I absolutely cannot draw from plans or use CAD simply because I have no real interest - I am a builder its as simple as that.  I can read plans and follow them and that is the limit of my skills in this area.  I'm sure that many other builders have a similar blind spot but maybe in another aspect of our hobby.

 

I've also learnt that there is no way I can, or want to just jump in and try and build a man o war.  I want to start off slowly and build confidence when I make the many up and coming mistakes along the way.

 

So I'm thinking about starting with a detailed cross section.  I don't want to buy a kit as I have all of the necessary tools and wood to make the parts.  But I don't want to have to do any draughting whatsoever.  I have read quite a few books but being a bit dyslexic doesn't help much either.

 

So now that you know my failings with regard to building anything really - Could anyone recommend a way forward for me.  I would like to get some really detailed plans that show the novice how things are done if there is such a thing.  Maybe there isn't but I would be very grateful for any input for my future build.  I also like the idea of building in 1/48 as my current build is quite big and I found it a great size to work on.

 

Thanks Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished the Echo cross section from Admiralty models (link to the build log in my signature below).  The plans and tutorial were great, and the Fully Framed Ship Model books give a huge amount of additional information.  It made for a great project.  David and Greg are no longer operating admiralty models as a business, but might be able to help you with the tutorial and frame plans.  Definitely qualifies as detailed plans, and is in 1/48.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a scratch cross-section with readily available plans, the Triton is the only one I know of.  It's a good project and if you look at the logs, you can do as much or as little detailing as you like.  

Here's the main link to the cross-section and the full build along with the instructions on how to join.

https://modelshipworld.com/forum/89-cross-section-build-logs-for-hms-triton/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 

 

And firstly thank you very much for the replies.  I wasn't sure whether to put this out there or just build another tug.  I'm actually glad I did now as I do want to move on with my hobby.

 

I do have a few questions that I hope you can help me with.  I really like both suggestions and I could see myself building either of them as they both look extremely good.

 

I like the look of the echo cross section and I have had a look on the Admiralty website previously.  I saw that they sold basic frame plans but it seemed that if you wanted the detailed plans you had to buy a kit.  The wood and kit was supplied my Crown Timberyard who it looks like has ceased trading.  I think that the owners are probably on this forum due to the way they are spoken about and maybe they could help?  I don't know so any advice would be welcome.

 

I also like the look of the Triton build especially as there is a group that is currently building this.  I understand that you get the plans and then print them out but I have read that sometimes when you print these things it changes the scale slightly.  This is how behind things I am  - I don't own a printer but I could either buy a printer or get them done.  Is my understanding of this correct or have I misunderstood some of the things I've read about printing plans out?

 

Cheers Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True on the Triton.   What you can do is take them to an print shop (I use a local architectural shop) and specify what I want.  If it's 100%, that's what I get. As long as one place is printing them, if it's not exact 100%, then all will be off that much so there's no problem.

 

You might contact Admiralty and see what is in the package.  You might PM Greg (dvm27) and he can tell you as he's one of the owners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark

 

Thanks for the reply - I'm glad that what I thought was true.  I've been doing so much research as best that I can that I think I've confused myself.  I will drop Greg a message to see what is available from him and I will have to see what printers are in my area with regard to HMS Triton.  This is going to be the start of a long journey for me which is great.  It'll be nice to milling wood for a fresh build!

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, VTHokiEE said:

Have you looked at the Triton cross section (https://modelshipworld.com/forum/89-cross-section-build-logs-for-hms-triton/) or Bomb Cross Section (I think the plans are at Navy Board Models)?

 

The Triton helps support the NRG and has the group build area here to take a look at.

 

Bomb vessel cross section from this site with plans

 

Any of the books from Seawatch books could be used for a cross section I think without too much difficulty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, No Idea said:

I'm coming to the end of my current build which is a steam powered Italian tug which over the past 3 years has turned out nicely.  I cut all of my own planks and parts and made just about everything in good old fashioned kit bashing style.  I've about 6 months left on it before its first sailing.

I would love to see some photos of your steam powered, Italian tug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bob

 

Here is about 800 photo's of it

 

https://modelboatmayhemimages.co.uk/album/5xP

 

But here is a couple that I took recently.  Its made of boxwood, mahogany and pear with a twin cylinder engine and 3.5" boiler.  Its been a real technical challenge to squeeze it all in but I'm nearly there.  Just got the the boiler housing and wheel house to finish and its going on the water

 

 

IMG_3478.jpg

IMG_3463.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your tug is stunningly beautiful, Mark! Thanks for posting the photos.

 

The hull and deck planking is gorgeous. What woods did you use in your build?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Bob - I know that we are digressing but the lower hull and main rail is mahogany and and the bulwarks are boxwood.  The deck is pearwood and its been a lovely build for me.  Its a kit but I've only really used the frames and made all of the other wooden parts myself so the kit seems like a waste of money.  Its been a real challenge getting the boiler and motor in as I had to cut the keel down to the bone to lower the centre of gravity.  Otherwise it would be very unstable in the water.

 

Hopefully as you can see I can build but I just cannot draw or find the will and effort to learn to a level where my building would benefit.  Hence my post and I'm happy with my limits and I am also very glad that no one has criticised me for this.  We all can't be all round builders and designers.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, No Idea said:

Hopefully as you can see I can build but I just cannot draw or find the will and effort to learn to a level where my building would benefit.  Hence my post and I'm happy with my limits and I am also very glad that no one has criticised me for this.  We all can't be all round builders and designers.

To say you "can build" is a understatement to say the least. That tug is a superb model and you are a gifted craftsman. No one will criticize on this forum; they'll just admire your work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I understand, there is no longer a kit of the echo cross section.  In fact if you just contact them they will make available the plans and instructions.   You dont need to buy a kit at all.  Its a wonderful project.

 

Contact Greg Herbert from the admiralty models site.   The authors are also members here at MSW and will look in on your project as you progress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for your help and advice.  I have dropped Greg a message and I'll go from there.  I still have about 6 months work left on the tug but I like to have my next project ready to go when the time comes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your tug looks amazing!  I did not use a kit to build Echo.  They were selling kits at the time, but I like to mill my own wood.  They were really nice and sold me the plans, tutorial, and a gun barrel separately.  They also gave a lot of help and advice while I was building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...