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clearway

HMS Terror by clearway - OcCre - upgraded

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17 hours ago, broden said:

Very impressive. What a comparison. Castings can be good but that one certainly was not. I am enjoying your build log and will start mine as soon as the kit gets here.

The most important reason to replace the windlass drum, other than the casting quality, is that the casting only has a single pawl, but the Terror's bell is mounted on a pair of pawl bitts. So the double pawl bitts are shown in the kit, but don't match with anything on the drum. 

 

Keith your work is fantastic. I will be ordering a copy of Mr. Betts' book as well. Very soon your ship will be ahead of mine! My work has kept me so busy I can barely keep my house in order. I haven't been on my real boat at all this month. My "Terror" is on a shelf in the lounge so I don't forget about her.

 

I really like how you've carved some angled bits of wood to represent the iron forgings at the foot of the windlass cheeks. They look good and solid. I made mine from brass sheet and they don't represent the solidity of these parts as well as your wood ones do. 

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Ty keith s and broden and for likes and views everyone , what Keith s said regarding windlass barrell, but still better in wood even if casting was right😁. the angled wood replacing the wooden knees infront of windlass are from from the angled offcuts you are left with when removing accomodation hatch roofs from middle of tops Keith😉 i cut them to size and gave them a coat of CA to strengthen the ply. I might be restarting work soon myself so will be shipyard deprived😱, it normally takes me nearly a year to get as far as i did with Victory and Terror.

 

Keith

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hello all, finally got round to building the two caldercraft 10 spoke ships wheels i bought to replace the 8 spoke occre supplied ones and fitted the brass trim to the columns , also worked on the table for the azimuth compass (i suspect the compass by this stage was in a box around 12" square and not in a cabinet like on earlier ships) i used some turned brass columns left over from earlier builds for the legs, a bit chunky but i reckon a table on the exposed deck of a ship wouldn't have spindly thin legs. still not sure how i am going to improve the skylights but i do have some 1mm square section walnut about my bodice🤔🤨. decided to use the dark oak stain/ varnish on the capstan.

 

1540107240_Terror_helm1.thumb.jpg.2026441fd5b69c5bf7cf1ac829c03b03.jpg

 

151141322_Terror_quarter_deck1.thumb.jpg.0c7dc741453a47882222ea544bebb3e4.jpg

 

so far the wheels have been primed and had a base coat of humbrol dark earth, will use washes and varnish to make them hopefully look a bit more "woody"

 

Take care all

 

Keith

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The azimuth compass was a different instrument from the magnetic compass, similar to an astrocompass for finding true north from the sun's position in high latitudes. The ship had magnetic compasses too. The TV show is not perfect but for what it's worth there is a scene in the programme that briefly shows the magnetic compass housed in a binnacle box lashed to the top of the aft skylight. It's one of the things I've been pondering for my model. I find it difficult to accept that the main magnetic compass was situated on that table with the mizzen mast and running rigging blocking it from the helmsman's view. An azimuth compass on the other hand needs a level surface and you can't steer by it; it's (I think) used for taking stationary "shots" to provide corrections for the main direction-finding instruments.

 

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ahhhhh, the azimuth compass was not something i was familiar with. seen the binnacle cabinet in the pics we were exchanging Keith and find the idea of it on top of the skylight a bit weird as they are normally on the deck unless they had a smaller style binnacle by then (we will have to see what mr Betts book comes up with methinks). 🤔

 

Keith

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just done some looking around online and found this

 

19th_C_Ships_Binnacle.thumb.jpg.e875bd2dfd2f05577738e7ef4c585c28.jpg

19th C Copper Ships Binnacle Compass mounted with a illumination lantern manufactured by Dents London
The Compass is stamped Patent Liquid,Dents 61 Strand London 1836
Dent constructs the First Gravity Escapements.
Dent invented and registers the Fluid Compass, which was used by the Royal Navy and the Royal National Life Boat Institution

 

Maybe this would be what terror carried for the helmsman?

 

Keith

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I found the binnacle cabinet being lashed to the skylight a bit problematic too, because the skylight was meant to open on the top for fresh air. I can't work out where else it might have been. However, it's an operational necessity to have the compass in full view of the helmsman. It must have been somewhere immediately forward of the wheel, in full view. I've ordered Matthew Betts' book too, so I'm expecting we'll have lots of conversations about that when it comes out later this month! 

 

That copper binnacle looks very sensible. I still can't think of anywhere it could have been other than the roof of that skylight! 
 

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me as well Keith, but with being portable it wouldn't be a problem. to be honest though the captain gave the course orders and often if in open water would give the command "full and by" which means keep her steered with the sails full of wind so no compass needed to steer by, also the reason why the helm was always right at the rear of sailing vessels so the helmsman could mind the trim of the sails.

 

Keith

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20 hours ago, clearway said:

me as well Keith, but with being portable it wouldn't be a problem. to be honest though the captain gave the course orders and often if in open water would give the command "full and by" which means keep her steered with the sails full of wind so no compass needed to steer by, also the reason why the helm was always right at the rear of sailing vessels so the helmsman could mind the trim of the sails.

 

Keith

 

I suppose; that's how one steers a sailboat even now. However, somewhere-or-other there's an account of Erebus and Terror pausing somewhere on their departure to have the compasses calibrated. Calibrated in this case meaning compensated for the various iron stuff in the ship creating a magnetic field, like the railway locomotive sitting in the hold behind the mainmast! They would have been calibrated to a specific location on the ship.  I persist in my belief that there had to be something more elaborate than a box sitting on a table, and as we know, other ships like Trincomalee and Victory have nice big binnacles in plain view of the helm. I think the copper portable compass in your picture being lashed to a bracket (to keep its orientation constant) on the roof of the skylight is the simplest explanation.

 

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that would make sense Keith i agree, the binnacle on ships a few years later had a small binacle mounted on the deckhouse infront of the helm e.g. cutty sark. Back in the shipyard and got the accommodation hatches finished and the extra planking under the capstan, nothing is actually glued in place on the decks yet. Also found a brass stovepipe in my odds n sods box so will use it for captain croziers stove😁

 

834995536_Terror_fore_hatch1.thumb.jpg.591074aa80e087389fb4b99a70f4cccd.jpg

 

264222983_Terror_after_hatch1.thumb.jpg.4c85d27745b4a81e690163af6b0752e4.jpg

 

take care all

 

Keith

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Oh I like that stovepipe! Now that really does look the part. I will be interested to see how you manage the glazed windows on the skylights. I found that to be the part on mine that caused the most amount of frustration. I ended up taking a strip of that darker veneer that comes with the kit and backing it with painter's tape, then carefully cutting windows into it. For "glass" I just used a thin strip of sellotape and fogged it with CA adhesive. To be honest I thought it looked like a dog's breakfast but I tried all kinds of other methods like building tiny window-frames the proper way, and I just wasn't able to make it look any better. Once I trimmed it all with slivers of veneer on the outside I thought it looked OK. Mine is at least an improvement over the "jailhouse" look with the brass bars. In order to fit the requisite number of windows I had to sever the top from the bottom of the little plywood box from the kit and get rid of the corners. They are too thick. The "roof" is now supported on the little window-frames. It was all extremely fiddly. 

AF9AF150-14C1-4A27-A400-2127BD45B2B9.jpeg

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