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@rexnuktiaor may I call you Rex?

Anyway, a warm welcome to MSW, I have never build any Master Korabel but found your build log intriguing. That is small yawl.
If this is your first wood model kit you are doing great. 
Personally I would have never started with such a small model.

Looking forward to follow your log.

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On 5/14/2020 at 12:23 AM, Nirvana said:

@rexnuktiaor may I call you Rex?

Anyway, a warm welcome to MSW, I have never build any Master Korabel but found your build log intriguing. That is small yawl.
If this is your first wood model kit you are doing great. 
Personally I would have never started with such a small model.

Looking forward to follow your log.

Thanks buddy, you can call me Amar. The "rexnuktia" screen name is just a made up thing from years ago when I used to play onlone video games LOL! 

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On 5/14/2020 at 8:07 PM, Cathead said:

Small boats like that can be built with slow-cure glue, I'm finishing two 3" long boats from Model Shipways kits right now.

But how do you hold these tiny weird shapes pieces in place while waiting for the glue to dry? My clamps are way too big and utterly useless for such a tiny application. 😟

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On the home stretch now. Having the foot boards in one piece is a brilliant design move. I was dreading putting these on one by one...

 

A couple of things were glued a touch out of alignment as my patience is running out. Will continue tonight as kids are a full time job during the day. 

 

Also just wanted to add that I tried to glue the rear grating using wood glue, but after a few minutes, the part curled up. Had to go back to superglue to tack it in place. 

IMG_20200520_221320.jpg

IMG_20200521_120027.jpg

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10 minutes ago, rexnuktia said:

But how do you hold these tiny weird shapes pieces in place while waiting for the glue to dry?

I think when he said "slow-cure glue" that he meant slow-cure CA (cyanoacrylate, commonly known as "super glue"). CA normally comes in either thin, medium, or thick formulations which cure at different rates, from fast (couple of seconds) for the thin stuff to slow (several minutes) for the thick. Medium-cure is the most general-use formulation and will set in ~30-60 seconds depending on how much you use, which means that parts can be held together with your fingers until it sets. One downside with CA is that any excess slopped beyond a joint will dry into an unsightly opaque white crust and prevent any stains from penetrating the contaminated surface. Removing the excess can be extremely difficult in confined spaces such as the interior of your tiny yawl, which means that careful and precise initial application is a must.

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EDIT: re. ccoyle, I did mean wood glue, though good point about the slowing-curing CA. I personally hate using CA both because of the fumes and because of its tendency to ruin wood as you noted. It's fine for setting knots but I really don't like using it on wood as it never seems to stay where it's put. I've read some people talk about using wood glue for most of the joints and a few spots of CA just to hold the plank in place while the wood glue dries, but have never tried that.

 

Original answer: There are a variety of very small clamps that can be purchased inexpensively from various sources. You can also make your own from small binder clips. In addition, I find that normal carpenter's wood glue sets up pretty fast (within a few minutes) when it is spread thinly between two pieces and held tight. This is especially true if you run a thin bead of glue along the plank edges, not just at the ribs. I can set a plank on a small boat like that with such glue, hold it in place with my fingers, and let go after a short wait. Fingers are the best clamps possible as they're infinitely adaptable and don't mar the surface. I still use clamps when I can to make life even easier, but I don't mind using fingers, especially if I just watch or listen to something while working to occupy my mind during the wait. If using wood glue, you should let it cure longer before stressing it, but it'll hold a plank in place pretty quickly. This works best if you soak and pre-bend the plank so there's less tension on it.

 

See my recent build log for two 3" boat kits from Model Shipways for ideas and the following photos:

 

IMG_0611.JPEG

Note the mini-clothespins in the background here, these are very useful:
 

IMG_0676.JPEG

Might not work for everyone, just sharing how I've done it.

 

 

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I'm very late to this party it seems, but really interesting to find your build log.

 

I'm currently building the same kit as a replacement for the boat supplied in my build of the Thames sailing barge Will Everard (see my build log). Your progress is nice to see and an inspiration.

 

It's curious that you did not get an English instruction. I bought my kit here in Sweden and I got a good English instruction in the kit.

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39 minutes ago, bolin said:

It's curious that you did not get an English instruction. I bought my kit here in Sweden and I got a good English instruction in the kit.

I suppose he bought it from EBay, not from the official dealer. When you buy from EBay you get what you get, it is a lottery in some way.

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11 hours ago, Cathead said:

EDIT: re. ccoyle, I did mean wood glue, though good point about the slowing-curing CA. I personally hate using CA both because of the fumes and because of its tendency to ruin wood as you noted. It's fine for setting knots but I really don't like using it on wood as it never seems to stay where it's put. I've read some people talk about using wood glue for most of the joints and a few spots of CA just to hold the plank in place while the wood glue dries, but have never tried that.

 

Original answer: There are a variety of very small clamps that can be purchased inexpensively from various sources. You can also make your own from small binder clips. In addition, I find that normal carpenter's wood glue sets up pretty fast (within a few minutes) when it is spread thinly between two pieces and held tight. This is especially true if you run a thin bead of glue along the plank edges, not just at the ribs. I can set a plank on a small boat like that with such glue, hold it in place with my fingers, and let go after a short wait. Fingers are the best clamps possible as they're infinitely adaptable and don't mar the surface. I still use clamps when I can to make life even easier, but I don't mind using fingers, especially if I just watch or listen to something while working to occupy my mind during the wait. If using wood glue, you should let it cure longer before stressing it, but it'll hold a plank in place pretty quickly. This works best if you soak and pre-bend the plank so there's less tension on it.

 

See my recent build log for two 3" boat kits from Model Shipways for ideas and the following photos:

 

IMG_0611.JPEG

Note the mini-clothespins in the background here, these are very useful:
 

IMG_0676.JPEG

Might not work for everyone, just sharing how I've done it.

 

 

That Sir, is exactly what I was looking for, although to ccoyle's point again, the slow cure CA is another very good option. Thank you very much for the guidance, I'll definitely check out your build links and give the wood glue a shot.

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So using wood glue now, I find tiny pieces stay in place long enough to stick without clamping. I do let the glue thicken a bit (by waiting for a couple of minutes) before putting the pieces together. 

IMG_20200522_000450.jpg

IMG_20200522_000511.jpg Front nose jig will be removed after curing timorrow morning. The back board will not sit properly. I'll need to shave off some pieces from the aft sitting boards which will be done tomorrow as well after the glue is dry. Center board left off as per instructional recommendation. It needs the metal bracket and mast to align base mast holder first. 

 

 

 

IMG_20200522_000703.jpg

IMG_20200522_000617.jpg

Also built the stand as glue was drying. Pieces stayed at right angles while the glue was drying. 

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