Jump to content
WalrusGuy

Most sentimental/rewarding/challenging model you've had the pleasure of building?

Recommended Posts

Just thought of this question. Which model has the most sentimental value to you? Maybe this also coincides with which model has been the most rewarding thus far? 

 

Would love to hear some stories. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, my most rewarding project was my scratch build, half-hull model of Fra Berlanga.  Never heard of her, right?  Fra Berlanga was a refrigerated cargo ship ( Banana Boat ) of the United Fruit Company ( see my scratch build log).
D5BAA327-90FC-406C-BB0F-3242EB4B901A.thumb.jpeg.f17ea5319a6bd8a7b9490fb8a0332f37.jpeg

872D5040-20A2-40E9-9217-48ED021C04A7.thumb.jpeg.9dd4d2aa59470f8dd5f9c110eeaefed4.jpeg

 

Not the most complicated nor super-detailed project, so...Why rewarding?

  • The Captain of Fra Berlanga was my daughter-in-law’s grandfather. 
  • The only surviving mementos of the Captain’s career that the family had was one photograph. 
  • There were no available drawings of the ship to work from. 
  • Real field research was required to re-create the lines of the ship, which involved participation by my son, and a stranger from halfway across the country.
  • Every aspect of this genre of ship was new to me. 
  • I wound up giving away the model to my son’s father-in-law. 

In addition to having been fun for myself, it made others feel good. 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have to say the Royal Louis. I have forgotten who the manufacturer is. She is highly modified. I have built better models but since I was a kid I always wanted to complete a big 3 decker so she was somewhat of a lifelong, 40ish at the time, dream.  She is the only model I have kept. That’s a French and Indian War era powder horn I made in front. 
 

728BD7E8-BFCE-4FD8-B153-34A3325C1989.thumb.jpeg.25c0cf4e8b6c31d35f8e5c06400c3898.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I built this BlueJacket lobster boat for my mother's 71st birthday. She loves Maine and travels to the coast every year. She placed it in a little "Maine Shrine" in her house, shown below. The craft is named for her and its bow number commemorates the event. The joy this gave her definitely makes it my most rewarding model.

 

IMG_5184.thumb.JPG.47ad5ff463d7ed99b334f416d92a73eb.JPG

DSC07508.thumb.JPG.d6cc706246037c3bf3936a4a222ec7ca.JPG

DSC07507.thumb.JPG.e620871a694b50a03d032ddec762384b.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely the Great Harry (restoration still under way). I built her when I was 17, pulled her apart to fix the shape of the stern and then left her for 40 years or more.

 

It's a great pleasure to be bringing her back to the state she ought to be in. (Link to Build log in my signature below).

 

Steven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point, my Prince de Neufchatel is my hands down favorite.  It is the first model that I went all out on.  It is also the model that I had the most fun building.

 

That includes over my Victory.  Although the Victory is my first ship of the line which has been a goal for years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most challenging model I ever attempted and actually finished was a 1/100 scale card model of HMCS AGASSIZ (K-129), a Flower-class corvette. I was a relatively new card modeler, and a teacher friend asked me to build a Flower for him because he was teaching a unit on The Cruel Sea (same teacher that I built Ghost for). The model had somewhere around 2500-3000 parts, and because it was in 1/100 scale there were no after-market details available for it, so I had to do all the railings, etc., from scratch,which was a huge challenge for me. But I got it done. Wish I had some good pictures of it, but I don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rewarding?  For me it would be my Constellation build.  To go from a very very inaccurate (fictitious!!) kit to something that ended up looking like the real thing.  

 

Pleasure?   My Licorne.  Sadly it's gone as the person I built it for, destroyed it.  I'm thinking of doing it again just go with my Belle Poule.

 

The most emotional would be my CH-53 model.  I did maintenance and flew as crew when I was in the Marines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

has to be my 1/72 Victory, as it was the first to be completed using reference material, it took me 7 years though, as I was at sea a lot of the time and a few other smaller builds, that were not maritime related

 

 

IMG_3993.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most challenging build for me was a re-modelling of the Heller plastic 1:150 scale Le Glorieux/Le Superbe.

My aim was to re-work the kit by reference to The Seventy-four gun ship by Jean Boudroit, and include fully detailed sails, and set the model in a waterline setting, two things new to me.

030.thumb.JPG.fdbe48439adf88b73803ed289d8ad44b.JPG

Extensive detailing at this scale was a severe test of my eyesight and one I couldn’t repeat.

Built over 3½ years, she remains one of my favourites.

 

B.E.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Kevin said:

has to be my 1/72 Victory

For a few seconds I thought it was the real ship, your model is that good. Strangely, it was the copper that first made me think otherwise - before I saw the tea towel and the house in the background!

 

17 minutes ago, Blue Ensign said:

Built over 3½ years, she remains one of my favourites

Stunning. Makes me want to try a diorama with realistic sea - currently not in my skill set.

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 That is an easy one for me. I was contacted by a man whose father had started a Constitution model, and had been working on it for years. The father fell ill and when I was contacted the forecast was that he had about 2-4 months to live  😞 The son thought seeing his constitution finished would bring his father great joy so he sent me the kit and I promised to get it done and back to him before 2 months. As it turns out, about 2 weeks after I received the ship the father passed away, never having seen the completion of his work. When I was finished (took about 5 weeks) the son was thrilled to have his father's completed ship as a memorial. fasdf.jpg.e5f3affa759f7044f2ed92fed1ae344e.jpg

sfdsds.jpg

asdfas.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done a couple of model jobs that had true sentimental meaning to me.  I have a lot of friends who served in Vietnam (not so many now) and several who served in the Brown Navy on the rivers and the Mekong Delta waters.  I built a Tamiya kit of their 1/35 scale Mark II PBR – Patrol Boat River and when a buddy who served multiple tours on a PBR saw it he was overcome by emotions.  A mutual friend later told me that he wanted to ask me if I would sell him the kit but didn’t because he was afraid of what it would cost. 

Well, I gave him that model the next time I saw him – we frequented the same barbershop and our appointments were frequently one after the other.  I changed my next appointment so I knew he would just be finishing his cut when I arrived.  I presented the model to him and his reaction made all three of us tear up.  I was very happy that it meant so much to him.  He took it to a reunion, and I wound up making several more models for guys he served with who he showed his model to.  Unfortunately, he died of cancer caused by Agent Orange a few years ago.  I finally made another PBR model that I was able to keep.  Photo is of the model I kept before it was cased.

555578917_PHOTO52.thumb.jpg.d94e489b77bd07e49ec7cbe593ccc967.jpg

The other model that I made that had real sentimental meaning to me was for Center for Marine Education in Paducah, KY.  I was contacted by Rev. Kempton Baldridge, Chaplain for the Ohio River Region of the Seamen’s Church Institute.  He enlisted me to repaint an existing 17” x 50” builder’s model of a river Towboat that was being renamed after a river mariner who lost his life saving a family of five on the Mississippi River, just south of the Gateway Arch.  Kyle R. Hardman was working for Inland Marine on June 13, 2012 when he and a fellow crewman saved the family, but Hardman lost his life in the attempt.  He was the first river mariner to be awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the USCG.

Inland Marine Service was renaming one of their towboats as the MV KYLE HARDMAN at a ceremony in December of 2014 at the Center for Maritime Education in Paducah, KY and I was contacted in September of 2014 to do the modifications to the model.  Rev. Baldridge brought the model to my shop and I repainted the model and changed the name and home port signage on the model to the new name and port.  Rev. Baldridge came to my shop and took the model back to Paducah in time for the ceremony.

The facts above are not what meant so much to me after all it was just repainting a boat model and I never personally knew Kyle Hardman.  But his story was what made me want to do the job.  If you watched the first years of The Most Dangerous Catch series about fishing and crab catching off Alaska you might remember there was a crew member on one of the main boats followed by the series named Kyle.  This was Kyle Hardman and I remember seeing at the conclusion of one of the programs that that program was dedicated to the memory of their crew member Kyle Hardman.  He was doing this dangerous job because he had a sick mother who had no insurance and he was able to make good money doing this dangerous job.  His Mother begged him to stop fishing because it was so dangerous.  He had finally quit the fishing and took a job on the river – a safer job compared to fishing in the Bearing Sea. 

The photo with Rev. Baldridge showing the model to Kyle’s sister Kelly Heinzinger at the ceremony.

244727189_MVChristopherM.Parsonagemodel-17.jpg.9c9a7b9c8dca1b18a3a9d6c08b56f093.jpg

The model as delivered to me with the old paint and signage

1144150972_PortSide-Finished.jpg.2923fa2ae1a0b6c228b1a87804ddee25.jpg

2144281270_STERN-FINISHED.jpg.1046f501704748fd3d26f79ac7fd08b9.jpg

2024737809_WithMVKYLEHARDMAN-awardeceremony.jpg.a3453651504a8d13c8f9c7980d548dc9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, kurtvd19 said:

I have done a couple of model jobs that had true sentimental meaning to me.

Not only are you a gifted modeler, Kurt, but you write very well also. The two stories you wrote about captured how meaningful your models were to the people they honored. Thanks for that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...