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ccoyle

Wütender Hund by ccoyle - Shipyard - 1/72

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Got the various bits of the bow in place. This completes the basic hull structure. @Chuck Seiler The ladder turned out to be too wide to fit its spot. I had to disassemble it and trim about 1 mm from each step. I glued the sides in first and added the rungs afterward. Next task is to fabricate and hang the rudder.

 

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On 6/13/2020 at 8:05 PM, ccoyle said:

One issue to look out for, albeit a very minor one, is that the the last three interior frames at the stern had the left and right labels (L and P, in Polish) reversed. Not a big deal, since the parts are identical, but using them as labeled will result in the reverse side of the ply facing out, if that makes a difference to anyone

I am at that point now.  I was watching out for this, but found a different problem.  There is a part (135) in thicker cardboard, then there is a better quality but thinner overlay (135a).  So for each you have 135L, 135aL, 135p and 135ap.  In my case, some of the overlays are reversed so that 135aL covers 135P. 

 

As long as you are paying attention, it is not an issue.

 

Great work so far Chris!!!

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The rudder is hung. Pintles and gudgeons consist of short bits of plastic tubing overlaid by faux metalwork made from brown cardstock and painted. Simulated bolt heads are daubs of glue.

 

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EDIT: I just noticed in the first picture that the rudder is riding up a little bit. 😑  No worries -- it's not glued in place, so a little push will set it properly.

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6 minutes ago, Landlubber Mike said:

Man that looks like real wood.

It is real wood! 😉  This is Shipyard's first foray into wooden kits. There is of course also the card version, which Chuck Seiler has been working on.

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58 minutes ago, Chuck Seiler said:

So, what is the deal with the rudder?  Did they have to untie and retie the rudder lines each time they altered course?

Dunno. I can't even vouch that the kit mirrors actual practice -- I just build it the way the instructions tell me!

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1 hour ago, ccoyle said:

Dunno. I can't even vouch that the kit mirrors actual practice -- I just build it the way the instructions tell me!

    Since the model seems to be somewhat based on the Bremen Cog wreck, I'm thinking they did SOME research.  Maybe not.  Having driven a 12 foot sailboat and a 4000 ton destroyer, I find it hard to believe they would lock their rudder in place and good exactly the way they wanted to go without any minor adjustments.  I can't do that in my car.

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Chris,

 

    I am working on my inner planking.  I currently have the picture of the Roland von Bremen on my desktop as inspiration.  As I am installing the inner planks I am noticing things on the RvB.  Shouldn't the model have cap rails?  Nowhere in my instructions do I see cap rails. 

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8 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

Shouldn't the model have cap rails?

Dunno the answer to that one, either. I know virtually nothing about the construction details of cogs other than what I have learned from working on this kit.

 

P.S. I learned something last night. I have been using 3M 77 spray adhesive for large wood-to-wood joints, as I would with similar card parts. I learned from experience that non-acrylic wood stain acts as a solvent on the 3M product. 😮 Hopefully, after everything dries the glue will reset. Hopefully.

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23 hours ago, ccoyle said:
On 6/30/2020 at 12:43 PM, Chuck Seiler said:

Shouldn't the model have cap rails?

Dunno the answer to that one, either. I know virtually nothing about the construction details of cogs other than what I have learned from working on this kit.

Upper works on a wreck are usually the first things to be lost, unless the wreck happens to be lying in a position/inclination that preserves them for us. The Ijsselcog seems to have had had none surviving https://www.academia.edu/40371597/The_IJsselcog_project_from_excavation_to_3D_reconstruction and the Bremen cog also seems to have lost a lot of its upper works - https://www.ipi.uni-hannover.de/fileadmin/ipi/publications/wiggenhagen_04_istanbul.pdf 

 

But if we compare the two pictures below (from https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/the-so-called-bremen-cog/owKSqVwIBfJGJw ) it looks like the hooked timber for the anchor is still in place, so the top strake must be as well - in which case there seems to have been no cap rail.

 

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One thing that really gets me is how short the strakes seem to have been. I wonder if there was a reason for it?

 

Sorry to hear about the speed bump, Chris, but the model is looking very good.

 

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13 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

One thing that really gets me is how short the strakes seem to have been. I wonder if there was a reason for it?

    The strakes or the planks in the strakes?  Are you basing that on the above picture and other representations or of the wreck?  I don't think the planks are small, I think the people are too big.

 

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    The planking pattern on the above picture, and other representations I have seen, is similar to the Wunterhund model.  I think they LOOK short because they are wide.  The above station master is 5 scale feet (5 feet 1 inch).  The plank 3 strakes above him is 14.5 feet long and about 2 feet wide.  I believe the representations show the cog as they see it, but the people are much larger...artistic license.

 

    Whadya think?

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That makes a lot of sense, Chuck. Without a sense of scale it does appear that the planks are short in comparison to their width, but apparently it's the other way around. (And with planks that wide there would be serious spiling problems if they were any longer.)

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