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Wütender Hund by Chuck Seiler - Shipyard - 1/72 - Hanseatic Cog 1390 - CARD


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   My current project is a cardboard model of a late 14th century Hanseatic cog (kogge).  If you have followed my builds before, you will know that walking and chewing gum are not my strong suit.  When I try to build a model AND document it with a build log, I usually get distracted.  Here goes.

 

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    Here is what is SUPPOSED to look like when completed.  We'll see.

 

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    Background.  For most of my life I have been a student of history.  I have focused on wars and other extraordinary events.  Armies, warships, wars.  Warships, like fezzes, are cool, bristling with armament.  They are normally an expression in the pinnacle of technology of that society.  In 1992, during the 500th anniversary of the Columbus expeditions, I had an epiphany.  Why did Columbus sail west from Europe and end up in the new world?  He was looking for pepper.  By the 1300s, trade between Europe and China/Asia was well established.  Exotic items such as silk and spices were high on the list of items traded.  Even common (for us) spices such as pepper was in high demand due to the poor quality of the food of the day.  Unfortunately (for many) the overland and oversea trade routes to the east were dominated by Islamic traders and the eastern Med by the Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa and Pisa; which added significantly to the cost of the product.   How do you cut out the middle-man?  Spain looked west and Portugal looked south, around Africa.  The result of those decisions could, and do, fill volumes.

 

    My eyes opened to the importance of trade.  Trade, like war and religion, cause cultures to expand, to bump into each other and interact for the benefit and/or detriment of all involved.  Trade and commerce may not be flashy, but like water it is constant and powerful. 

 

    If you are interested in trade, you have to consider the vehicle of trade whether it be a caravan, a railroad or a ship.  How did the products get from point A to B?  The Hanseatic Cog is one of those vehicles.

    About the ship.   The cog was the work horse of the Hanseatic League, a confederation of northern European trading nations from the late 1100s to about 1450.  The cog was the modern day tractor-trailer truck whose large numbers accounted for a huge amount of trade transported to and fro. 

 

    Cogs are first mentioned in 948 AD, in Muiden near Amsterdam. These early cogs were influenced by the Norse knarr, which was the main trade vessel in northern Europe at the time, and probably used a steering oar, as there is nothing to suggest a stern rudder in northern Europe until about 1240.  The influence of the knar is not a coincidence.  Viking exploratory trading adventures, raids, and piracy occurred early throughout the Baltic region.  Over time, the center of trade moved from Denmark to what is now northern Germany.  As range and cargo amounts increased, and expanded into open ocean, the vessel changed.  It became large and more seaworthy (although nothing to write home about).

 

     The need for spacious and relatively inexpensive ships led to the development of the first workhorse of the Hanseatic League, the cog. The new and improved cog was no longer a simple Frisian coaster but a sturdy seagoing trader, which could cross even the most dangerous passages. Fore and stern castles would be added for defense against pirates, or to enable use of these vessels as warships, such as used at the Battle of Sluys. The stern castle also afforded more cargo space below by keeping the crew and tiller up, out of the way.

 

    Cogs were clinker-built, generally of oak, which was an abundant timber in the Baltic region of Prussia. This vessel was fitted with a single mast and a square-rigged single sail. They ranged from about 15 to 25 meters (49 to 82 ft) in length with a beam of 5 to 8 meters (16 to 26 ft).  It was a bulky freighter with one mast and a square sail. A helm at the stern and a flat floor made it possible to ship in low water. Unlike the Nordic longboats they were more economical to use. A cog could transport a relatively large amount of cargo with just a small crew, on average up to 90 tons; the largest cog ships could carry up to about 200 tons.  They could be produced relatively quickly and inexpensively at that time.

 

    Larger loads could be transported more cheaply and by a smaller crew than previously. That’s what made this type of ship so successful. There were cogs of different sizes, between 15 and 25 m in length, 5-8 m wide and with a moulded depth of 3-5 m. The measurement of the capacity of a cog was called “last”, equivalent to 2 tons. This was the capacity of a carriage drawn by four horses. A small cog of 50 last was able to carry the same load as an endless convoy of 50 waggons pulled by 200 horses. There were also cogs twice as big. With the castle (aft) the surroundings could be observed well. Due to the lack of keel, the cog could also fall to ground during low tide, but it was also restricted to navigate because of that. A cog could only ride with the wind and not cross the wind.

 

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REPLICA COG "Roland von Bremen"...before it accidentally sank.  (oops)

The cog was not going to win any beauty contests.  It was a klunky beast, but very functional.

Edited by Chuck Seiler
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    About the Wutender Hund.  According to Chris Coyle, Wütender Hund was the vessel captained by Klaus Störtebeker, the leader of a group of North German privateers that were active at the end of the 14th century.  Wütender Hund roughly translates to “Mad hound” or “Angry dog”.  I will often refer to it as “Wonder Dog”. 

 

    If you look at various paintings and drawings of cogs, as well as more modern replicas, you will see some pretty plain cogs, some with stern castles and some with both fore-castles and stern castles.  The very pronounce castle structures and “fighting top” show that WH was intended for fighting.  Many had a raised stern castle for defense, while also providing a space to operate the ship, allowing more deck space for cargo.

 

 

 

1616711257_koggeandhound.jpg.cffaeda0f3368fb442eb8df79116f0e6.jpg

 

    The two models (Bremen Kogge and Wutender Hund) show the difference between the trading cog and war cog.  In these two SHIPYARD kits, the hull form is almost exactly alike, as are the parts.  The hull form appears to be based on the same ship that inspired the Roland von Bremen, above.

 

    The “trading cog” was often called into service as a “war cog”.  I am not sure how easy it was to add or remove the stern castle, but the fore-castle appears to be easily added and removed.

 

 

 

610168933_warringcogs.JPG.c7c143c1950ddfba27fe6907daa8b706.JPG

 

 

BATTLING COGS or THE FIELD TRIP DURING TH LAST NRG CONFERENCE...you make the call.  This shows the value of the higher castles.

 

 

Edited by Chuck Seiler
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    About the model/kit.  This is a card model by “SHIPYARD”, a Polish company who specializes in quality cardboard and paper models.  Many of their models are featured in MSW build logs.  I got my model from “Ages of Sail”, an MSW sponsor.

 

    Currently Chris Coyle is building a wooden version of Wutender Hund by SHIPYARD.  A description of the kit can be found at:  https://modelshipworld.com/topic/23468-172-wütender-hund-by-shipyard-hanseatic-cog/

 

    His build log can be found at:  https://modelshipworld.com/topic/24243-wütender-hund-by-ccoyle-shipyard-172/

 

    Clare Hess is building a card version of the stripped down “Bremen Kogge”.  His build log can be found:

https://modelshipworld.com/topic/23434-hanse-kogge-by-catopower-shipyard-172-scale-card/

 

    As I write this, I am well into the model:  I am into the hull planking and deck planking.  For that reason, I can give some thoughts on the kit. 

 

--The cardboard is pre-printed, but must be painted to give it color.  I am not wild about this…my painting skills are not up to the task.  Be sure to use a very watered down paint or else you will cover the pre-printed material.  Be careful when painting the cardboard.  Because the watered down paint will soak into the cardboard I needed to use long brush strokes to keep it from being splotchy.  I eventually had success with the single planks/strake, but continued to have issues with wider assemblies.  This caused me to go in another direction.

 

--Practice painting. 

 

--Challenges of cardboard.  In some cases (frame) I used Elmer's white glue and in some cases (planking) I used contact cement.  In both cases you need to get the piece set quickly.  Unlike with wood, if you need to deconstruct, it is very hard and there will be damage.  Once glued you are screwed.  While cardboard can be sanded, there are challenges with pre-painted parts if they are not flush the first time.  Sanding and repainting looks less than great.

--In my opinion, the instructions are good, but not great.  The instruction book is 55 pages and is mostly pictures.  The written instructions are pretty limited and normally not required, but sometimes a little more explanation is nice.  As Clare noted, sometimes they seem to skip steps, but if you look hard enough you can find what you need.

--The laser cut pieces are cleanly cut and clearly marked.  Most of the pieces stay put until you need them.  I marked the ones that disconnected and stored them in the box until needed.

 

--Many of the part have tabs and notches to help with assembly.  This is good because it helps ensure most of the pieces-parts go together correctly.  BEWARE.  For the basic hull, the bow looks alot like the stern and I was often confused.  I had to mark the bow to remind me.

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--The stiffeners are marked with arrows (forward and up) to help with placement...you are fine as long as you remember which way is forward.  🙁

    I am sure I will have other words of wisdom as I go along.  Let's start.

Edited by Chuck Seiler
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    The basic hull structure is formed by a number of interconnected athwartships frames and fore/aft longitudinal to provide strength.  The bow and stern have additional fore/aft strengtheners.  About halfway down from the top, a false deck in in place for strength.  Part of that will be the cargo area.

 

    It is best to dry-assemble the hull structure to make sure everything fits.  It is well made and precisely laser cut so it should fit perfect.  However, as I mentioned, it is a fairly symmetrical hull and often fore looks like aft and vice versa.  Parts fit ALMOST perfect if swapped around, but not quite.  Sometimes you have a tab but no slot.  Sometimes it doesn't quite match.  It is best to find these problems BEFORE you start gluing.  Don't ask me how I know.

 

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    Frame partially assembled.  You can see the cargo area which will be painted next.  Once the model is fully planked, you will never see this area, so I don't know why they include planking, but this is an opportunity to test painting methods.

 

    The cargo area shows the pre-printed planking and nails.  Clare Hess goes into greater detail on how to prepare the paint and then paint these areas with a watered down wash.

 

 

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   Side view of the frame assembly with one of the hull strengtheners.  Note the line on the strengthener.  (Don't worry, we will get a closer look later.)  This is one of many reference lines we will use to ensure the planking is done correct.  SPOILER ALERT:  It doesn't always help.

 

 

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   A view of the underside frame assembly.  The white covering helps strengthen and provides surface for planking.  The arrows (enhanced) are supposed to point forward.  I was able to get this mounted with the arrows pointing after (before I knew what the arrows were for) with no problem  Fits fine.  Later, when e start to plank, we will see where this is a problem.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, ccoyle said:

I see the difference now between this and the wooden kit -- the wooden kit does not have a first layer of hull skinning, hence the differences in the parts numbers.

 

Interesting.  I would think you still need some under support for the planking to ensure that, at least butt ends, have something to sit on.  Since the bulkheads are relatively thin and (as it turns out) the butt ends don't always fall on a bulkhead, I have added some blocks inside the frame to provide for support.  I think I document this (if I ever post my log).

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Three day weekend---wooooo hooooo!  :champagne-2:

 

What should I do?  Work on Wonder Dog, work on Wonder Dog build log or work in the yard (which I can legally do in California if the squirrels and all allhave masks and remain 6 feet apart).  Perhaps all three.

 

I suspect there may be scotch and barbecue somewhere in there as well.  :cheers:

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   More work done on the model.  Not so much on the log.

 

   I was going to spend some time on basic infrastructure, but I doubt that there is much interest, so I will launch into planking.  But first, just LITTLE on infrastructure.

 

    Most of the ship consists of two different plies of cardboard; a rougher thick stock, about 1MM thick and a thinner, smoother stock at .5MM.  Often these are laminated into thicker pieces.  Deck beams are 3 x thick stock.  Stem and stern pieces are 3 x thick + 2 x thin.  The thin stock is used for painted areas but not all thin is painted.

 

    Painting should be practiced in order to get the right look. I defer to Clare's discussion on painting for process.  Bottom line is that you paint the piece with a wash of #3 (kit comes with pain in numbered jars. As far as I can tell #3 is unbleached titanium) which serves as a primer.  Let that dry for 24 hours.  Next, paint with your primary color, using a watered down mixture.  This ensures it is not too thick and that you can see the reference marks/nails on the piece.  24 hours later you paint again using a wash of a different color, designed to simulate wood grain.  I did not need to do this since my initial wash did that fine.

 

    The instructions have you mixing the paints at different proportions to achieve the right color.  I was a little confused at first.  For the primary color, mix #15,29 and 30 in proportions 6:0,25:0,5....huh?🤪   I guess in some places they use commas like decimal points, so the proportion is 6: 0.25: .5 ... or 24:1:2.  ...or as close as you can get.

 

    I had alot of thoughts on painting, but too boring.  If interested, let me know.

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     It's time to plank.

 

    I mentioned earlier, an error in placing the big stiffener would potentially cause problems.  As we see, the first set of planking is set into a notch formed by the 2 ended arrow-head thing on the keel.  Prior to planking, a false keel is placed so as to be the same thickness as the planking.  When I test fitted the plank, I realized I installed the stiffener the wrong way.  No worries...I installed the false keel correctly.

 

 

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    In the above photo you can see the false keel and difference due to the stiffener being reversed.  First planking started.

 

 

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    The first plank assembly consists of one plank of the garboard strake, two of the broad strake and the entire third strake.  Placing the single plank of the garboard is easy.  Where do the ends of the third strake go?

 

 

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    Ideally, I would use the tick mark reference lines on the bow and stern to place the plank, but since there may have been some error i placing those pieces, I was not sure.  If incorrect there will be a gap in the planking.  This pic is a little out of sequence...the original one was way out of focus.

 

 

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    The plan was to install the garboard strake, then the broad and finally bring the floating wing into place.  The resulting photo did not turn out so well, nor did the planking.  Those wings flapping in the breeze kept getting in the way.

 

 

579528085_hullplnk4.thumb.JPG.575e8fdeaa87f9da42655577863d244e.JPG. 

 

    Plan B was to install the missing garboard and broad strake first (after carefully measuring where they should start, then install the assembly.  This turned out much better.

 

 

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    The clinker planking starts on strake 4.  The planks are marked where the plank above it should go.  As Clare pointed out, it is very important to be right on that line.  Being off will affect how high the planking rides.  The nail crew on this part of the hull were fired shortly after this picture was taken.

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    Clinker planking begins.

 

 

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    This picture looks familiar.  Strakes 4 and 5 (clinker 1 and 2) complete. 

 

    At this point the instructions get a little funky.

 

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    "How funky" do you ask?  By the time we get to the bottom of page 11, the instructions have us where you see us in the last photo above...3 non clinker strakes + 2 clinker strakes.  Jump to the top of page 12 and the photo as +4 clinker strakes and we are adding the stem piece, stern piece and keel.  Clare mentioned this in his log as well.  This is not a real big deal once you figure out that you didn't skip a page...just a bit disconcerting.  The planking process is pretty simple.

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I appreciate the little things in the design, like having the tick marks at the stem and stern to guide affixing the planks. But the system isn't 100% foolproof -- there's a little bit of wiggle room in where to glue the false stem and stern posts, and that can effect how the planks are laid. I'm just hoping that in my WH build that I've got everything close enough, and that error creep won't become a major factor. It's a good thing that this isn't a Halinski kit -- with Halinski, the design tolerances are so tight that if you get off by even a fraction of a millimeter, you're in deep, deep doo-doo.

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Agreed.  The reference marks on the bow/stern are good, but questionable for the first set of planks.  Once you know how correct they are, or how much off they are, you can plan accordingly.  I like the reference lines on the stiffeners because that can bring you back into battery if you do manage to get off.

 

Do your clinker planks have reference lines?

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Despite the lack of instruction, I soldiered (sailored) along.  It really is not that big of a deal...stick with the reference lines and the next 2 or 3 strakes are easy.

 

1039239046_hullplnk8.thumb.JPG.610ce0c01b179dba2452776149f139de.JPG

Construction proceeds with clinker strakes 3 and 4. 

 

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Clinker 3 and 4 complete.  They matched up with the stem and stern very nicely.  I had issues with earlier strakes where they did not run the whole length.

 

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Here we see the bow (or is it the stern) where the strkes did not run the full length.  If I had the presence of mind, I would have cut new planks from the cardboards stock at the time of installation.  Instead I tried to fix with minor surgery after the fact (see picture strake C-3 and 4 above).  If it were wood, I might have better result.  My solution will be to put an HO scale girl in a bikini on the top deck to draw attention away from it.

 

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Next I make the stem, stern and keel assemblies.  These are made by laminating several thick and thin cardboard pieces.  Above are the various pieces to the stem.

 

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Stem piece, stern piece and keel installed.

 

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Clinker +6 and additional appendages.

 

 

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On 5/16/2020 at 12:32 AM, Chuck Seiler said:

    About the Wutender Hund.  According to Chris Coyle, Wütender Hund was the vessel captained by Klaus Störtebeker, the leader of a group of North German privateers that were active at the end of the 14th century.  Wütender Hund roughly translates to “Mad hound” or “Angry dog”.  I will often refer to it as “Wonder Dog”. 

 

    If you look at various paintings and drawings of cogs, as well as more modern replicas, you will see some pretty plain cogs, some with stern castles and some with both fore-castles and stern castles.  The very pronounce castle structures and “fighting top” show that WH was intended for fighting.  Many had a raised stern castle for defense, while also providing a space to operate the ship, allowing more deck space for cargo.

 

 

 

1616711257_koggeandhound.jpg.cffaeda0f3368fb442eb8df79116f0e6.jpg

 

    The two models (Bremen Kogge and Wutender Hund) show the difference between the trading cog and war cog.  In these two SHIPYARD kits, the hull form is almost exactly alike, as are the parts.  The hull form appears to be based on the same ship that inspired the Roland von Bremen, above.

 

    The “trading cog” was often called into service as a “war cog”.  I am not sure how easy it was to add or remove the stern castle, but the fore-castle appears to be easily added and removed.

 

 

 

610168933_warringcogs.JPG.c7c143c1950ddfba27fe6907daa8b706.JPG

 

 

BATTLING COGS or THE FIELD TRIP DURING TH LAST NRG CONFERENCE...you make the call.  This shows the value of the higher castles.

 

 

Hi Chuck

I was happy to find your blog. Klaus Störtebecker is still a hero in Germany at least at the coast line. As far as I know, the ship is originally named "Toller Hund" : "Toll" has two meanings: mad and great. Klaus Störtebecker was both. 

Clark

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    At this point I will change focus and move on to the deck.

 

    I had problems painting the cardboard deck planks and decided early on to substitute real wood.  I used Alaskan Yellow Cedar from SYREN.

 

 

DECKPLNK1.JPG.46c5bc20fd86bf1fe7c3db7beada68e8.JPG

    Deck planks on a cog a different than we normally find on a ship.  In this case they run athwartship.  See above photo from SHIPYARD.  They run in five bands; the center band, which is the same width as the hatch, and two bands on either side.

 

DECKPLNK1A.thumb.JPG.def264f693a0c9f19e92378358cec88d.JPG

    On the model, the planks are represented with two layers of cardboard.  First is a thin layer of cardboard used as a false deck (left) and another thin piece which is marked with plank lines and nails.  This is painted.

 

 

1817111533_deckplnk2hatch.JPG.18874f5f0be3a4b4032f05a9a137b4df.JPG

    The instructions have you completing the stern section in its entirety and the outer bands first, then working your way in.  I went the other way.  Because the center section is based on the hatch and mast support, I dry fitted it and set the first plank fore and aft.  In the above pic you see the basic process, except this was after the deck was fully completed.  Once again, my original photo was out of focus.  :default_wallbash:

 

 

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     Here we see the hatch/mast support gap with planks fore and aft.  I also started on the second bands with the planks 'overlapping' so the joints did not run straight across.  The model planks vary in width, for some reason, but I chose to made them uniform (with a few exceptions).

 

    The deck beams had a lip that divided them so the planks sit nicely on the shoulder.  I continued the deck beams fore and aft using cherry strips.

 

    Originally, the plan was to treat each plank with Wipe On Poly, then glue them in place.  The placement was uneven so I ended up having to sand the deck down  in total.

 

 

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    I did worry about forming the edge planks too precisely.  I ended sanding the edges smoothly.  You can clearly see the hatch/mast support gap. 

 

 

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    Deck complete with mast support and hatch coaming in place.  When I sanded the deck I was concerned it would remove the brown paint from the cardboard deck beams.  As it turned out (I had discovered this earlier) the cardboard beams come out a nice brown when treated with Wipe On Poly.  The original treating of individual planks, followed by the mass sanding had the effect of making the deck not uniform color.  I like.

 

    One downside with using the wooden deck is that the cardboard deck had slots to be used when mounting future structures.  I'll figure it out. :cheers:

 

 

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    Progress on hull planking continues.  Pictures on the way.  I just wanted to post as potential warning for other builders.

 

    Progressing past clinker +6 I am finding that EVERY strake is about a quarter inch too short.  I am not sure why because I am hitting all my other reference marks.  I fixed the problem by laying the forward most piece (usually 2 planks), cutting the first plank from the aft piece, making a plank to make up the difference in length, lay that, then lay the last section so it ends up where it is supposed to be in the stern.

 

    So far so good, but it is annoying.

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    Construction on the hull continues.  So far so good, as long as you don't look too close.

1608022945_hullplnkxxx.JPG.1eb2225656ca8d4106c9c55b1037ea6d.JPG

 

 

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    That's a better look.  Clinker + a bunch.  We are now cresting above the deck.  As mentioned above, I am finding the strake about .25 inches to short, so I need to cut out a plank and insert a longer one.

 

181349145_hullplnkx2.thumb.JPG.b34bcf8f4f83a1c8829db0f9fb73dd43.JPG

    Close up of the plank. Painting is not as good.  Long story.

 

1982718543_hullplnkx3.JPG.6eb429fdd1e4f9dd10e77911bc1e4807.JPG

    Same plank, inboard side, showing supports.  The support on the right is a kit supplied double thick frame extension, placed there due to butt joint.  The one on the left is self made.  The kit was not supposed to have an actual but joint here.

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Steven,

 

    Many thanks.  I appreciate it. 

 

    In my limited but growing research, I have come to appreciate all your posts and info on medieval ships and architecture.  Medieval ships have supplanted US Colonial navy as my current area of interest.  I am looking at building the DUSEK COG incorporating some of your critiques of another build.

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8 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

Medieval ships have supplanted US Colonial navy as my current area of interest

Welcome to the Dark Side, Chuck.

 

I have to say I found the comments about the WH's forecastle interesting - they relate directly to a discussion at

 Maybe I need to re-evaluate some of my thoughts on this. If some cogs were indeed purpose-built as warships, the fact that some cogs had forecastles and "fortified" aftercastles while others didn't might be significant. And I'll be re-looking at some other contemporary pics from the 15th century with ships lacking a forecastle - perhaps purely merchant ships?

 

Steven

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    While the two SHIPYARD models above are not the definitive authority on cogs, I believe they do faithfully represent two styles of cog as seen in many of the paintings, coins and tapestries you have posted.  I would also like to throw in-various replicas. 

 

    While one style has NO fore-castle, another has a very clear forward castle integrally built into the ship.  WH appears to represent the middle ground where you can take your basic commercial cog, run down to Home Depot and get some lumber, slap together a forecastle and duct tape it to the bodacious stempiece.  Obviously the various depictions span several centuries and can be attributed to different building styles and conditions.  The ones with the Home Depot Fore-castles (HDFC) could well be ones built in less than tumultuous times but were pressed into military service or added when the threat suddenly increased.

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9 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

The ones with the Home Depot Fore-castles (HDFC)

HDFC - I like it. I'll have to use that term from now on. (Thus speaks the man who, after the Battle of Hastings re-enactment of 2000 AD was known as H2K (Hastings 2000) -  for the 2006 re-enactment coined the term TNBO -The Next Big One - which became the shorthand for the event among the re-enactment community. Of such things is immortality made).

 

Steven 

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