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Paul Gardner

Beginner tooling list

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I know that this has to be the umpteenth time someone has asked this question, but I've not been able come up with the proper word search combination to find a post that gives a concise list of tools needed to begin a project.  I realize that this list is subject to ones own interpretation, but I need a benchmark list to start with.  I'm moving into a new home this month, and I will actually have a designated spot where I can start a model, which is this beautiful wood shed.  The riding lawn mower is moving to the garage.  I understand the need of a pin vise, hobby knives, rulers etc, but if there's a post that would give me a good idea of what I'm going to need as a base tool box, I'd be eternally grateful.  My first model is going to be Model Shipways Fair American.   Thank you.

shed 1.jpg

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As far as tools go, have a look here: http://modelshipworldforum.com/ship-model-materials-and-tools.php   The first 3 posts should help get you started.

 

Also, go to the kit area and this topic is pinned to the top.  Download the kits list and have a look at what others have done.

 

When you're ready, open a build log and above all else... have some fun.

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Start building and buy tools as you go, you will know what you should get. According to the scale and whether you scratch build or not, your needs might be different. You will however accumulate a lot of staff so first get a large work bench (or two)! 

 

Regards

Vaddoc

 

 

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Thank you. Sorry for the delay in response but we were moving into our new home. I now have a place to build! I've been trying to decide if I should put a top on an existing workbench and buy a tall chair, buy a used office desk or buy a 6' folding table and go from there. Any suggestions? 

20200531_124558.jpg

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One can never have enough storage, Paul. Shelves and drawers fill quickly! (Shallow drawers are more efficient.) I see you have a window with good natural light. If you are planning to work daytime, a bench on that side might be a good thought. I assume this will be only a summer-time activity. If not, insulation and heating will be considerations as well.

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I would suggest a second work bench.

The one you have is for your boat, you may need space for soldering, for a scroll saw, a drill press, a disc sander, space for drawing...heavy solid benches work better for me. I use a couple of bar stools.

You will also need a lot more light. It needs to be coming from all directions to eliminate shadows. Because of the detailed work we do, we need unusually strong light. Think of the number of lumens you feel is enough, then double it and then double it again and this will be your starting point. Your wooden walls will not reflect a lot of light.

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Paul,

First, if you have not already, check out Hank's thread in this forum  /22426-converting-a-backyard-shed-into-a-model-workshop/.

 

I would use Liquid Nails and fit as much pink or blue Star Phone (E. Ky pronunciation) exterior insulation sheeting as will fit between the 2x4's. 

If you then cover the inside with 4x8 sheets on the 1" white/ foil pressed beads version, it will insulate and brighten the place.  Oh, oh,  mark the centers for every 2x4 on the outside surface as you cover them over.  Stud finders are a royal pain to have to use.

 

A low cost bench =  a long, wide Lauian-type flush face hollow core door, fix a furring strip at the back as a splash guard,  cover the top with a sheet of Formica-type material (this is what contact cement is for. Do not get too much because it is worthless as an adhesive for ship models).  Buy a pair of two drawer economy grade filing cabinets to hold it up.  PVA glue 4 pieces of scrap wood on the underside of door to make a socket for the top of each filing cabinet - keeps everything in place, but can easily be taken apart.   Toss the 4 filing cabinet drawers and fix a shelf where the bottom of each would have been.

Your existing bench is also a candidate for a Formica top.

 

For a dead flat work surface, two pieces of thick safety (museum) glass  12x18 inches - have the glass shop bevel all the edges.

 

For tools,  the economical course is like using a bayonet in a mine field.  Open the kit,  decide what your first step will be,  decide which tools will do the job and only buy those.  Do this for each subsequent step.  This should keep you from sinking a lot of money in buying tools that you will not use - at least until you inevitably contract the tool acquisition virus.

 

 

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Paul,  I don’t see a vise.  Both a small bench top machinist type and an under counter carpenters type are useful if not necessary for any workshop.

 

In my opinion, no two people will work the same way or will adapt to the same tools.  For example, most modelers find small rotary tools (Dremel) necessary.  I personally have never been able to use one productively, so I do my work using other tools.

 

Therefore, follow the advice posted above and buy tools as you need them.  Some will work for you, some may not so you will have to figure out what will work.  That’s part of the fun.

 

Roger

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Flexibility is of great value because you will evolve and want to change things around. As for the basics:

 

1.  Insulate the whole building, walls and ceiling, and even the floor if you can. Make sure it is weather-tight. You don't want a damp atmosphere to wreak havoc with your iron tools and cause wood to warp and twist. You'll also want a heater and/or air conditioning. (Small portable units for both are now available at reasonable cost.) From the level of your workbench upwards, I'd suggest covering the walls with white melamine-faced pegboard. This is very handy for tool and materials storage and very flexible. Things can be rearranged as you want over time.

 

2. Put a row of wall outlets at the height of your workbenches and some at the baseboard. Also, attach power bars to the front of your workbenches beneath the lip of the benchtop. These are dirt cheap and will provide excellent access for corded power tools. You don't want hand-held power tool cords strung across your workbench working surface. The outlets on the front of the benches prevent this. You want to be able to minimize the number of cords running across the floor, as well. Bench-top stationary tools plug into the higher outlets on the walls behind the benches. Also install a weatherproof outlet outside on the shop wall.  Ideally, there will be a concrete pad outside the entrance. This is valuable shop real estate which is very handy for messy painting jobs, woodworking that generates a lot of sawdust, and similar tasks.

 

3.  Make  sure your workbenches are very solid and have sufficiently strong lips for attaching clamp-on devices. You should have at least one very solidly mounted medium-sized vise you can put all your strength into without the bench moving! A small clamp on vise is also handy. No vise is any stronger than what it's mounted on.  

 

4.  To the greatest extent possible, leave space beneath your benches to permit easy sweeping and vacuuming. Put anything you can on rollers, so it can be moved around to accommodate space needs for various projects and for cleaning (and searching for dropped tiny pieces!)

 

5.  Consider investing in a heavy-duty "Work-mate" woodworking bench. (The larger models with scissor-folding legs.) These are easily stored when not in use and invaluable for many essential tasks.  This can serve for your primary workbench for "heavy" tasks on larger parts and will hold pretty much anything of any shape. YouTube is full of videos on the things that can be done with this "cult status" tool. It's a great space saver in a small shop and a great thing to have even in a large shop. https://www.toolnut.com/black-decker-wm425-workmate425-portable-project-center-and-vise.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&msclkid=a62653da17071f5406ba0d0e723e17ca&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=*Shopping - High - Broad&utm_term=4578022847964901&utm_content=Catch All

 

Black & Decker WM425 Workmate425 Portable Project Center and Vise
 
"Advanced, 1-Handed Clamp system with exclusive clutch design for easy clamping. Front jaw swings up for vertical clamping. Folds for easy storage and carrying. Vise jaws angle to hold wedge shapes up to 8 5/16 in. wide. Swivel pegs hold shapes up to 18-3/4."
 
6.   If circumstances permit, run a coax cable to the shop and install a cable outlet on each wall at workbench height to provide a connection for internet access and a television, if you are so inclined. (I find a TV to be welcome company when doing boring repetitive tasks.) The more "comforts of home" you can provide, the more attractive it will be to be in your shop.
 
7.  A high-volume electric exhaust fan (as in home bathrooms) where you have the passive ventilator up at the apex of the roof will, in combination with an open window or door, provide good ventilation when working with solvents, paints and adhesives. If you are going to do any metal work involving combustible heavier-than-air gases, be sure you also have provision for passive exhausting at lower levels. A portable fan is always a handy thing to have in a shop.
 
8.  Buy a lock and don't give a key to anybody else in the family. Significant Others have a genetic predisposition to dumping anything they don't want in the house on top of any horizontal surface in a workshop where it becomes your problem to find a permanent home for it. :D 
 
 

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3 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

Buy a lock and don't give a key to anybody else in the family. Significant Others have a genetic predisposition to dumping anything they don't want in the house on top of any horizontal surface in a workshop where it becomes your problem to find a permanent home for it

Indeed, it is a constant battle to prevent the admiral filling up the garage with stuff. One needs to be determined, cunning, adaptable and plenty of other words but it can be done.

No insulation for me Bob, the admiral knows it and that prevents her sending stuff my way...

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