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I recently discovered a Facebook group, Historic Canneries From The Bering Sea to British Columbia. I'm not a big Facebook person but this group is fascinating if you enjoy history and enjoy seeing images of old canneries, salmon can labels, tenders, and fishing boats. I went through the discussion portion and I didn't see any of the nonsense that is sometimes assioated with Facebook groups. 

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1111665015550691

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But why stop at British Columbia? There were canneries all the way down into California. The river that flows through my childhood hometown of Fortuna, the Eel, supported two canneries back in the day when oldtimers say a person could cross the river on the backs of the salmon. And speaking of the 'old days,' at one time the San Gabriel River in Los Angeles county was considered a premier steelhead stream. Not anymore, obviously.

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Seems to me that those canneries would make great themes for unusual Dioramas, especially if there was some type of water craft involved.

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1 hour ago, ccoyle said:

But why stop at British Columbia?

 The group was started by a women in Anchorage, her knowledge of canneries below the Columbia River maybe limited or no one has yet to join/post regarding the canneries in California? But I agree, the history of canneries in California is every bit as fascinating. 

 My dear wife and I lived in Egegik, Alaska for nine years and we both worked for the canneries. In fact, our's was a cannery romance that has stuck for 41 years. 

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1 hour ago, Dan Vadas said:

Seems to me that those canneries would make great themes for unusual Dioramas

It would, a ship tied to the docks with a pile driver to one side would be pretty nifty. 

One summer I had to replace the head log on our pile driver, not one of my fondest memories. 

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