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captain_hook

Castello Boxwood Price?

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Hello,

 

I found a source of large Castello boxwood sheets here in Germany. Unfortunately I‘m not familiar with the current price. The seller gives some information:  Sheet length between 1,20m (about 4’) and 2m (about 6-7‘), 8 - 15 cm wide (3 - 6“) and 5,2 or 6,5cm height (2-3“). Price including tax would be 11,50 Euro (about 12,54 Dollar) per Kilogramm (2 pound). Is that currently a good price?

 

Thank you for any input.

Castello in 52 mm oder 65 mm Stärke / Längen zwischen 1,20 m - 2,00 m / Breiten liegen etwa bei 8 cm – 15 cm / Der Preis beträgt  11,50 € pro kg inklusive Mehrwertsteuer zuzüglich Versandkosten

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My math on this is kind of shaky,  I you can get this for ~$28/bf  and Gilmer is selling it for $44/bf now.

What you are describing is lumber - a board.   6 inches wide by 2 inches thick by 4 feet long.  Now, that is a unicorn.

 

My math:  51 lb/ cubic ft.  (Wood Database)   A bf (board foot) is 144 cubic inches   (12" x 12" x 1")  51 / 12 = 4.25 lb/ bf

a cubic foot = 12" x 12" x12"

$13/2 lb = $6.50/lb    $6.50 x 4.25 = $28/bf  I am thinking that this is what Chuck was paying back when he could afford to supply it.

 

If my math is correct,  Take out a loan and buy as much as you can. 

Unless this crash produces a World wide deflation, this is a deal.

My Hard Maple is ~ $8/bf  and Black Cherry is ~ $6/bf  - both grow in my region, it is bulk shipping by lumber truck/

You can probably get Acer pseudoplatanus  (Sycamore Maple) and Pear for a price in the same ball park,  so Castello does not have a monopoly over your choice of scratch build lumber.  If you have your heart set on using it, this may be a once in a lifetime deal.

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Good Evening;

 

I agree with Jaager, even if it is not seasoned it still sounds too good to miss.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

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Mark,   yes, probably even if green.  It is probably just me, but I think it would be seriously meshugga to pay the extra cost of shipping green wood from Brazil to Europe, as well as having to deal with the agricultural customs regulations for wood that could harbor pests.  Just speculation, but I assumed that it would be kiln dried before it was loaded into a container.  But you would be paying a lot for water were it indeed green wood.

 

 

 

I come at this from a very specific aspect of all this. 

This is strictly based on my philosophy and experience, an opinion piece only:

 

I favor POF at a higher end scale, but not a heroic one.   A scale of 1:48 would be ideal, detail can be had without too much faking.  Not wishing to sacrifice too much detail, but needing to be practical about display size, I opted for 1:60.  I wish my imaginary fleet to all be the same scale.  Even at 1:60 a first rate man of war is an imposing presence. 

Using Castello for framing at the larger range of scale,  My guess is that a single frigate size vessel may use about 2"x6"x48" or more of your lumber stock.  What with the curving timbers, there is a high proportion of waste.  Castello is so expensive that it would only make sense to have open framing below the wale, on both sides. 

With wood this expensive and it becoming difficult to restock,  serious tools are needed to process it.  This means that a free standing bandsaw with a blade that is stronger than mere steel is needed.  The waste from a tablesaw - multiple passes, flipping the stock is too expensive in wood lost to kerf.  The one advantage that a tablesaw has over a bandsaw (other than initial cost) is that you do not need to worship at the alter of blade replacement.

 

If you intend to use this just for planking, deck furniture, and masting,  your cost in lumber per vessel will be significantly less.  However, with boards this large, hard  and heavy,  it will still require serious shop machinery to work them.

 

Now,  if you have the proper tools, skills and time  and you load up a large supply,  you may be able to sell milled Castello to the community.  With it being a sellers market, you would stand a chance of recovering what you spend on tools, blades, and lumber in a reasonable time, and supply a sought after product.  HOWEVER, given that this would be skilled labor on your part, I doubt that you would be able to sell this at a price that sufficiently rewards your labor.

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Thank you Jaager. I will order a small amount first (maybe 20 - 30 kg) to check if the source is reliable. The seller told me, that the wood is about 9 month old (after cutting down), so a 15% weight loss of drying out the wood should be expected. I have to store the wood then for some time. But it is not needed now, I would like to use it for a first POF project in about 2 years or later.

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Jolley,

You have the advantage of it being domestic for you.

Given similar history elsewhere, what seems to be a constant and never ending supply,  could just as easily evaporate in the future.

It looks as though you can also get Pau Marfim - which is listed as being excellent for masts and yards.

What sort of wood do you get with Mixed Indigenous?  The price looks good,  maybe scrap for jigs, if there are no gems in there?

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10 hours ago, Jaager said:

Jolley,

You have the advantage of it being domestic for you.

Given similar history elsewhere, what seems to be a constant and never ending supply,  could just as easily evaporate in the future.

It looks as though you can also get Pau Marfim - which is listed as being excellent for masts and yards.

What sort of wood do you get with Mixed Indigenous?  The price looks good,  maybe scrap for jigs, if there are no gems in there?

Yeah, I hear you. I try and stock up as much boxwood as I can.

The horrible reality is that boxwood is used as firewood in rural areas over here! - one man's trash is another man's treasure comes to mind.

The mixed indigenous has some potential, which I would like to explore in future - White pear, which is similar in characteristics to European pear and Cape holly, similar to the other holly species

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Cape Holly is listed in the Wood Database.  If it is similar to ilex except for the color not being white, it will work for most anything and everything. The sample looks like the color varies, so if clear finished wood is the goal, I would use an aniline dye to get a uniform display.  You would have to look long and hard to find a wood that works better for planking.

White Pear - what I find is Pyrus calleryana in answer to the search.  The white refers to the color of the blooms.  The cultivar that I am familiar with is Bradford.  The wood is hard, tight grain, closed pore. 

It grows fast, Spring wood and Summer wood are fairly wide and are slightly different in color.  But only slightly. It is more brown than pink/red.  It has a mildly waxy feel, but glues well.  The uses and working characteristics make it a joy to use.  I think it is a bit harder than Holly,  but should be just as useful - for any part.

If what you can get is close to the above and the price is as low as I read it to be,  rent a storage locker if you need to, and buy as much as they will sell you. The same with the Boxwood and Pau Marfim.

The basic assumption behind this is that your objective is scratch building using POF.

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22 hours ago, Jaager said:

White Pear - what I find is Pyrus calleryana in answer to the search.  The white refers to the color of the blooms.  The cultivar that I am familiar with is Bradford. 

The basic assumption behind this is that your objective is scratch building using POF.

Thank you for the the info Jaager, much appreciated!

The white pear we have is the Apodytes dimidiata https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apodytes_dimidiata, still worthy of stocking up I think.

Definitely going the scratch build route.

 

PS. Apologies captian_hook for the thread drift.

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