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Fish transport vessel by Heinrich der Seefahrer - 1/48 - after af Chapman LX N°4 - SMALL - CARD


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Hi Guys,

 

since this small boat is covered, I hope to have a better chance of getting the model build than with an open top and an inner structure to be build.

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The plan comes from the Architectura Navalis Mercantoria and can be found on plate LX under number 4 with it's own scale ruler. 

 

My girlfriend builds, when she improves and sews on her beautiful little Tilda figures, I can work in the living room on her table on my cardboard pices with a cutter a steelruler and a glue. So I can work without too much machine tools and dirt vice versa to her. So it always goes ahead when we are sitting opposite each other and are creative in the same moment - a beloved time. So there is progress especially on weekends.

 

The small vessel, which is not even 13 meters long, is referred to in the index as "life fish transporter with a well used around/at Stockholm".

This also explains the holes in the aft hull, because in the well the caught fish swam in the fresh water. So they came to the customers and cooks fresh even in summer. It was the case that the fishermen knocked off the contents of their net at the catcher in front of Stockholm directly in his well alive and were paid on the spot. As a result, they did not have to face the risk of selling, but only that of the already uncertain catch. The dealer then sailed to Stockholm and sold the freshly caught fish on the quay or in the market.

Like the fishing boats of the southern Baltic Sea (the German specialist for southern Baltic Sea's wooden boats Helmut Olszak wrote about it ), flat and very round shapes are predominant here. And from the same source I have been  told there were very little of the boats not clinker in the Baltic Sea. (But I will try her fitst inva creveel planking.) This hull shape developed to be able to drive with the uneven Baltic thinning and the changing flow in this swallow waters. 

 

 

Unfortunately, I find no more specific date than "dated before 1768" before the first edition of Chapmans Arch. Nat. Merc.

Dimensions:

 

- Length: 42 - 2/3 Engl. foot

- Width: 12 - 5/6 engl. foot

 

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The hull has only two frames with a  real convex shape, otherwise everything is concave, which should make construction very easy. I find the clinker of the cabin roof and the supported iron bracket that leads the lower gaff tree interesting.

 

The masts are completely specified and I like that very much, I don't have to reconstruct anything. The rigging is certainly rewarded in red and probably in two parts, since the boat may have driven a large gaff sail and a jib. So far I have not found anything that indicates a second foresail. The lower gaff tree is moved with a hook on the mast, the shorter upper one with a rope and a claw.

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I scaled the plans to 1/48 and then printed out a copy set in 1/24 and finished it ready to build; so I'll start in 1/48 as the scale is quite confortable to work in in cardboard...

 

So now it is time to search for materials for the construction of the inner hull.

So this is the start on this weekend.

Bought some cardboard in "bookbinder quality"

 

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in 2mm, 1mm thickness and cardboard from 300g to get 0,5mm in brown (the DIN A4 sheet came 0,29 each and the DIN A2 sheet came 0,79...)

 

 

I also got an 8×1000mm round beech stick for the mast. 

Now I have to deal with the construction of the inner hull.

So let's start.

Just cut off the frames to bulkheads.

But I figured outone very aesthetic baroque feature on the bodyplan:

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In a hatching the S-curved bulwark.

And my furst trial to get a three dimensional drawing of the hull

 

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it is not breadth enough - but does give a very first start to me for the superstructure.
 

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Here the S-shaped bulwak at the stern - my design trail filling the gap in the Chapman drawing aft. 

So I hope there are some ideas about the S-shaped feature, as I amnot really shure how to deal with it. And in particular what's to do with the dotted line under the gunwale's level? 
 

Hope you like it seeing me working on saturdays and sundays :D

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