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Enterprise 1799 by probablynot - FINISHED - Constructo - 1:51


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I tore the cellophane from the kit on May 30th 2013.
I devoted a fair bit of time to studying the plans and instructions, and getting to understand Constructo's approach to the build.
I was expecting to find a parts list included among the plans.  But Constructo seem to rely on careful packaging and marking of all the separate parts, instead of just listing them.  I'll have to hope they're reasonably generous with the planks of wood.

There's a special note in the kit pointing out that, if I'm so awful at planking that I need to resort to double-skinning, they've included enough 0.5mm strips for me to do so.  They don't put it quite as bluntly as that, but the inference is there!  I'm pretty sure I'll be making use of those 0.5mm strips!

The instruction book looks easy enough to follow.  110 pages (with better photographs than Artesania Latina provided with my Mare Nostrum kit).

This evening I've done a dry - unglued - assembly of the false keel and 11 frames.  Not easy.  The joints were an incredibly tight fit, and a very careful bit of filing-down was necessary to get everything fitting together properly.
The plywood false keel is rather flexible - I must devise some sort of jig to make sure it remains straight and true when I add the decks.

It's a start!
 

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Thomas, it looks pretty good to me.

The plywood for the false keel & frames is a bit fluffy , but OK.  Keel/frames are cut cleanly without laser burns.  The strip wood looks good.  Many small wooden parts (eg, for the cannons) are pre-cut.  Belaying pins are well made, and the blocks are better than the ones I got with the AL Mare Nostrum kit.
Brass parts, including cannons, look very good.  And the brass planking nails ARE brass rather than plated steel!
Three large plan sheets, and instructions in 7 languages including decent English.
All in all, I'm quite impressed.  But remember, I've only got the AL Mare Nostrum kit to compare with.

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Brian,

Youve made a great start. It'll be fun to watch another "Lucky Little Enterprise" come together.

It appears they have updated the instructions, mine make no reference to the .5mm strips. As far as plank quantity i had enough to complete the planking with a few mistakes. Unfortunately I made so many I had to contact Constructo for more, which they sent, at no charge! Cant argue with that.

Enjoy!

Sam

Edited by src
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Ah.
I can now see this 'Enterprise' kit is a step up from the Mare Nostrum!

Today I glued on the two decks, and the filler pieces at the stern.  I was surprised to see how much 'spare' I need to shave off the decks to align with the bulkheads.  It wasn't like that with the MN!
I'm especially concerned about the stern end, however.  Those filler blocks (parts 19 and 20) will need some serious shaving, presumably when I have to reduce the decks to align with the bulkheads.
I was particularly worried that I'd be shaving the stern so that it was narrower than the transom piece (45).  But reading forward in the instructions, I find that the transom is actually wider than the stern!
Seems odd to me.  Will it all become sensible as I proceed with this build?

Later on in the instructions, it says I have to start the hull planking just below deck level.  Does this mean that I should leave the decking proud of the bulkheads by the thickness of the planking strips?  Or does the deck have to be within the planking?

I do like the size, the proportions of the Enterprise.  I feel I've made a good kit choice here!

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Brian,

think this is what you are asking about: the first plank on the hull goes just below the deck based on the instructions. The high lighted area is what I think you are referring to. 

post-326-0-56379100-1371085274.jpg

 

The way I understood it, was the first plank went just to the bottom edge of the deck and then later when you glue on the waterways even with the deck edge, those surfaces become your glueing surface for the rest of the planking. My instruction book has the waterways on page 19 and the upper decking on page 27.

Hope this helps.

Sam

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Thanks for that Sam.  I reckon I understand it now.

The instructions (step 2, page 14) say "file the edges of the decks so that they fit the frames".  OK for the main deck, but the poop deck sits on only 2 frames.  So there's no guidance as to the shape of the poop deck.  I'm guessing I have to keep the sides straight, instead of introducing any element of curve.  Would that be right?

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Brian I can not remember exactly how I worked through that. I remember somebody giving me guidance on the best way to go about it, but or the life of me I dont recall, its been several years. I think I faired my bulkkheads trying to keep both the curve of the waterways on both decks to follow though as well as the the curve of the hull true and fair, then trimmed the deck to match. Your deck appears to have a much larger overhang than mine did when I fit it up.

Here is how mine fit, I remember having to do a bit of filler on a bulkhead or to;

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Hope this helps

Sam

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<<I remember having to do a bit of filler on a bulkhead or two>>

I know what you mean, Sam.  The bulkheads are a puzzling mixture of shapes.  Most of them are properly perpendicular to the main deck, but a few have a somewhat galleon-shaped inward curve to them above the waterline.  Also, a couple of them seem not to match in for a properly faired hull.  I even questioned whether I had got the bulkheads in the wrong order, but no, I wasn't that stupid!

I'm tempted to keep the shape of the deck as it comes (which is a good, close average of the bulkhead measurements) and remove only a millimetre or so each side.  And then do (as you did, Sam) a bit of filling in.
It's something I had to do with my first build.  But that was because I'd made an error, not because the kit was deficient!

I didn't get anything done over the weekend.  When the Admiral's about I have other duties, mainly involving oils (cooking or massage).  But later this evening I'll be getting my non-Dremel out, with a little sanding drum on the business end, and progress will be made!

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and progress will be made!

 

and fun and relaxation will be experienced!

 

I enjoying watching your build.  That particular Enterprise had a very interesting career even without Kirk.  I can see the appeal in building her!

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It has been a while since I built my version of this kit, which is slightly different from the one now on sale, but I do seem to recall the false deck overhanging the bulkheads, I believe I took my sander to the problem to make the deck flush with the bulkheads. I then faired the bulkheads using a fairly long file to take the place of planks. It seemed to turn out well. My biggest regret is that is made small bow fillers instead of good-sized ones.

It looks like you are doing a good job with this build. Keep it up and please keep the pictures coming.

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Actually, right now, progress isn't being made.  Not much anyway.
The main deck's in line with the bulkheads.
I've got the stern blocks shaped almost to my satisfaction, though I keep going back to them and tweaking them a bit.
I haven't faired off the bulkheads yet, but I don't see them as presenting a problem.

The thing that's exercising my (newbie) mind is how to approach the deck planking.
My first build was a trawler.  The planking was easy - it had to be neat, but there was no emphasis on 'pretty'.  The Enterprise, however, needs more care.
I've been trying out a few methods of simulating caulking.  Ordinary pencil graphite isn't satisfactory - it gets everywhere when I sand it down.  Black felt-tip marker looks OK at first, but it bleeds.  I thought I'd found the solution with a black (art quality) wax crayon, but even that is inclined to spread when sandpapered.  Black thread in between the planks?  No - far too fiddly!

More research is required before I proceed.  I bet there's an answer somewhere in MSW!

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Hey Brian,

On your planking, maybe a drafting lead instead of an ordinary pencil lead? I dont recall what lead I used, 4h or hb but I did one side and left the other clean, then scraped. I got a single coat of 1lb blond shellac on as soon as possible to stop that gray mess. just a thought, I am sure you will find a way that works for you.

Sam

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Thanks Sam.  Actually I'm trying again with the black wax crayon.  It's a Caran d'Ache 'Pablo' pencil (black 666.009).   I revisited the experimental patch I made last week, and used a scraper instead of sandpaper.  The result seems quite good.

Now, is there a way of simulating treenails without going to the extreme of making (and inserting) treenails?

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Edited by probablynot
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There is a thread around here somewhere where a couple of different pseudo- nail methods are explained.

 

One involved drilling shallow holes and then patching them with a wood putty that is a shade or two different from the wood.  After the putty dries you sand or scrape everything so that only the nail shapes are left.The other method involved "embossing" the wood with a .5mm mechanical pencil and then using stain if I recall.

 

 

Hopefully my descriptions will give you enough to search on.  Its late here, but I'll look tomorrow and edit in some links if I can find them.

 

 

Both methods look good, but of course, they aren't REAL tree nails.  :)  Real treenails are made with an actual dowel and two wedges!

 

Have fun.

 

Edit: See post #3 for .5mm pencil.

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/575-hms-surprise-by-derik-artesania/

 

 

See post #6 waxy pencil in drilled hole

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/740-methods-for-making-treenails/

Edited by PopJack
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Brian, that looks good! I haven't heard of using crayons before, the wax doesnt affect the stain or topcoat?

 

For your treenails, there was a builder on the old site who used a pickle fork  instead of a drill and I think putty over that. As I recall they looked surprisingly good. I cant remember their screen name, all I remember is it was one of the ladies and she is from your side of the pond. Maybe somebody with a better memory can point you in their direction.

Sam

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Useful links, Popjack, and thanks for your input Sam.

I'm still experimenting. I'm currently trying paint (black Humbrol) along one edge.  Using a brush to apply it is messy - it's easier and neater to impregnate a small bit of thick fabric with the paint, and just draw the cut plank over it.

And I just remembered I've still got 'nail hole and corner filler', in various colours, left over from the days when I used to do picture framing.  Should be just right for the treenails.

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OK, decision time.
For the deck 'caulking', I'm going with the crayon I mentioned in #18 above.  The effect is subtle, but it does work, and if I use a scraper ab initio instead of sandpaper it doesn't seem to spread and mark the planks.  I haven't tried an oil finish on it, but it takes a polyurethane varnish well.
Treenails?  I've decided that they're beyond my current skill level, and I shall leave them out.  I would weep tears of blood if I made a mess of them and spoiled the build.  Maybe next time?

I'm not at home this weekend, but I hope to be able to make progress (and post some pictures) before next Friday.

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<<??? I doubt they are beyond your skill level, Brian>>
Thanks for those words, PopJack.  Maybe you're right, maybe not.  But I don't have the confidence right now to start on what might be 400-500 treenails and be sure I'm going to get every one properly placed and correctly proportioned.  And while I'm agonising over these darned treenails I'm not building the Enterprise!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Honestly, I would never have believed how long it's taking me to do this deck planking!
OK, it's because I'm doing it in 12cm strips.  And each one has to be coloured on all edges with my black Caran d'Ache crayon.  But I've been at it for over a week now, and I could swear I got the Mare Nostrum's whole deck done in two days!
However, I'm pleased with the effect so far.  And it'll look a lot better when I've done some scraping and given it the first coat of varnish.

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Edited by probablynot
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très belle

 

I think I did my Mare Nostrum's deck in a quick couple of sittings- of course, your seams all appear to line up and stuff.  Might take a bit longer when you do it that way :)

 

I'm waiting to see how her deck looks when completed.   I have some purpose built scrapers in the shop that may just have to make the trip upstairs. 

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Brian, the deck looks good! Your build of course, but tree nails really add a level of detail, and they dont take THAT long.

 

Just an FYI, I dont mean to tell you how to do your build and you may have already figured it out, if so disregard this. That section of the false keel that rises up above the deck at the bow will be visible when you finish the hull. The instructions make no mention of it and they were very careful to crop it out of all the photos. I ended up planking mine after the hull was finished when I realized it wasnt accounted for later. Really kind of aggravated me, it would have been so much easier to take care of earlier. Anyway, just a heads up.

 

Looking good!

Sam

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Thanks for that Sam.  Actually I had already started to wonder how that prow would be dealt with in the later instructions.  You seem to be saying it won't be dealt with!

OK!  Now that I know, I can do something!

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