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All,

Thanks for the conversation about plans. I am just going through my first read of book 1 and had the same thought about copies. I did not realize that a copy of the framing plan for shipway use had been included.

A great addition Ed,

Thanks,

Richard

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You are welcome, Richard.

 

I included the extra plan 2B for the shipway for just that reason. I built the original Naiad with just one copy of the plan glued to he shipway with Krylon spray adhesive. My drawing was on lower quality paper but held up very well. I did have to change out one part, (my large prints were all in 11 X 17 pieces taped together) because I was making revisions and additions to the drawings as the work progressed. To help protect the drawing on the shipway you may wish to spray it with a protective coating. I would use someting that dries matte and can be marked with a pencil, since some of that marking is required along the way. It will also make cleaning up glue blobs easier.

 

Since all of the ncessary patterns and templates are on the CD and can be printed multiple times as needed, there is no need to do any tracing on or defacing of the large drawings. In some cases copies of parts of the large drawings were included on the CD to use as templates. The large drawings are therefore only needed for measurements. Measurements are usually taken with dividers or calipers. Calipers are better in the sense that they do not have the tendency to prick the drawings - if you are interested in preserving them.

 

I think protecting drawings on the bench (or if you wish, on the wall)should be quite easy using clear Mylar polyester film. Here is a link where it can be purchased in 24" width on a roll by the foot. I have not tried this, but its 7.5 mil thickness should allow dimensions to be easily picked off. I may try this on my Young America drawings as a test.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Mylar-Stencil-Material-Blank-Mylar-24-stock-priced-foot-7-5/dp/B008FPASTK/ref=sr_1_1?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1390405076&sr=1-1&keywords=mylar

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

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Ed,

Just to be sure... while building, you would not use the mylar on top of the shipway plan (2B) would you?

 

Checked on Amazon and the mylar is cheap enough but the shipping is more than the mylar. For my display plans I had used the thin hard plastic used for picture framing instead of glass. It was clear, solid and easy to write and erase with white board markers.

 

Richard

Edited by rtropp

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Richard,

 

I personally would not use Mylar on top of the shipway.  You will need to make precise pencil marks on the paper base for setting the fore and aft location of the gantry or for other uses during the build.  You will see these methods described in various chapters.  I used a Krylon product called matte Preserve-it on the paper.  Its a spray coating that can be applied after pasting Dwg. 2B to the board.  It can be marked with pencil, like a very sharp pointed 2h or 3h.  I suppose if you used a thick plastic base sheet you could scribe lines instead.  Just make sure the thickness of the sheet doesn't effect your vertical measurements.  But why bother?  the pasted 2B is a write-off anyway.

 

Yes, I noted the shipping cost.  I assume it is the same for various lengths.  Sounds like you have a solution.  Thickness may be important so you don't get refraction when you make measurements.  I took some measurements through a 10 mil binder cover plastic sheet and it was OK.  Be careful with those markers.  If you pick some up on your fingers from  the film it could stain the work.  Forgive me.  I'm very cautious about that - no water soluble colored pencils, no fine line felt tips, no soluble inks, etc. allowed in the shop.

 

Ed

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Ed. I was looking at the second, more complex, clamp in your first book and thought that would be a good little side project.

Problem is I am not all that familiar with taps and dies.

Do both taps and dies come in LH and RH?

Most tap and die sets do not indicate LH or RH, so is there one way they come by default?

Do you suggest brass or stainless for the stud?

 

Have to tell you, even though my start of a build is way off, there is so much in your book that helps right now. I have just ordered the dark pigment to test out mixing with glue to simulate caulking. I want to see what impact all that handling has on its ability to stay moist in the bottle and not dry out too quickly.

 

Thanks,

Richard

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Richard,

 

You are right.  The flexible clamps are a bit of a project in themselves.  Compared to the easier ones, they are almost a nicety.

 

Taps and dies are available as either RH or LH, so be sure to get both.  I used brass and would suggest you use the same.  The darkened glue should last as long as the normal glue.  You do not need a lot of pigment to get the dark color when it dries.  Be sure to slurry the pigment in water to eliminate all lumps before adding the glue.  Then mix very thoroughly.

 

Good luck.

 

Ed

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Richard,

the flexible clamps are a challenging project to make, but they are extremely useful in the building process, as much as the other ones Ed has shown in his (splendid) # 1 book. You can set the pressure you need, which you cannot do with the spring clamps, clamp odd sized pieces and, last but not least, they are themselves beautiful little things. I have made several clamps of various sizes and shapes to accommodate different clamping needs. Pictures below, taken at various stages of construction, show the clamps and their use. Make them, you will enjoy it! 

Happy modeling and regards

Salvatore

 

post-860-0-35424200-1391160965_thumb.jpg

post-860-0-97812900-1391160987_thumb.jpg

post-860-0-48715200-1391161012_thumb.jpg

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Hi Ed,

 

Could you or someone else explain why the threads on the two clamps need to operate in opposite directions?

 

Regards

 

Rob

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Salvatore,

Thanks for the response and especially the pictures. I agree with your comment about their look. Part of attraction to this hobby is that I really love the way wood looks. I think that is why I got involved in wood sculpting years ago. something about the look and feel of finely finished wood.

 

I also looked at the other screw down clamp you show in your photos. They would also answer a need I have. Do they use wood screws that are driven into the platform each time they are used or did you drill holes in the platform and attach the clamp with a nut on the bottom of the work platform? I need to make a few of those in different sizes.

Thanks,

Richard

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Rob, the right and left hand threads on each screw allow jaws to close or open as one screw is turned.  The jaws can then be adjusted independently at each end.  With rotating cross rods in the jaws threaded appropriately for the threaded rods, very flexible clamping positions can be set.  These are miniature versions of the popular "Jorgensen" style clamps widely used in woodworking.  They take some getting used to, but once you get the hang of it, they become treasured tools.  I have sizes up to 12" long, but these are not often used in model work

 

Ed.

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Thanks Ed,

 

I can see that the two screws allow independent adjustment of the ends, I just don't understand why they have to have opposite threads. What am I missing?

 

Rob

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Without opposite threads the jaws would both move in the same direction when the screw is turned - instead of opening or closing.

 

Ed

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Richard,

I could not agree more with what you say about the look. When you look at the tools made by the great craftsmen of the19th and18th centuries you can see that the look was then as important as the technical function the tools were intended to perform. Why use a still nut bought at an hardware store when you can make a beautiful turned and knurled brass round nut? The time needed to make it is not wasted. Time is not money for us, at least not the time spent in modeling ...

As regards the screw down clamps, the are moved around the board in relation to the shape of the piece to be held down. I simply start a hole with an bradawl where the clamp is needed and screw down the screw. Be careful not to tighten too much the screw otherwise the clamp would break. When you cannot shift the clamp by moving it with your hand then you have to stop tightening.

Salvatore

Edited by Smac

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I think I need to have one of these clamps in my hand to really understand! As I see it the two screws are not interlinked, so whether they open or close 'their' end of the clamp depends solely on the direction they are turned, not the direction of the thread.

 

The reason I am interested is that buying taps and dies for LH and RH threads is expensive and you will rarely need the LH set after you have made your clamps. If the clamps can work with one thread type only then the job is simpler and cheaper.

 

Sorry for persisting, by the way.

 

[EDIT] I think I understand now - each screw has one end with a LH thread and the other end RH. I assumed that one end turned in a kind of captive collar in one jaw so that the other jaw moved up and down on the threaded part. Silly me!

Edited by Decoyman

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Well, Rob, LH and RH taps and dies are expensive. For that reason there is a simpler type of screw clamp described and illustratedin Volume I. It works on a different principle and is not as versatile - but it is simpler and cjheaper to make ad will suffice in 90% of the applications. As far as understanding the Jorgensen style principle some closer study should help you get your head around it. Its similar t the turnbuckle princple which als uses RH and LH threads.

 

Ed

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Since this is new to me, I decided to order from a regular supplier rather than tough it out online or with E-Bay. I found an online retailer, Victor Machinery in Brooklyn, That seemed to have a large, varied inventory and called in to price the order. I wanted to describe my intended use to make sure I got it right.

 

I priced the 6-32 tap and die, as well as LH and RH taps and dies for the 4-40. I also priced the tap and die handles that would be required.

 

Without mentioning manufacturers (I would not know anyway) the price came out to about $43 for the hardware and $12 for shipping.

 

Given how much clamps cost and how often I need to replace them, and their use for other jigs, I think it would be a good investment for me.

 

Richard

Edited by rtropp

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Richard

 I have been looking at the same place for LH thread tap and dies. 

I am going to order the 6/32 and 8/32 LH tap and die this weekend, seems like a good deal that I could find.

 

Hard to find left hand tap and dies in the smaller sizes

 

Let us know what you think about these?

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Don't forget the #43 drill for the 4-40 threads. Also, the rods should be sized to the major diameter before cutting the threads .112" for 4-40. A table of thread dimensions is attached that may be helpful for other sizes.

 

Ed

Screw Thread Table.pdf

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Ed,

Hope its ok to take up space here with some more tap and die talk.

 

In your book you indicate using a 5/32 brass rod with the flexible clamps that use the 4-40 tap and die. Does this mean I can use the 5/32 without having to resize its diameter?

 

For the 6-32, I can find brass rods with screw threads but if I wanted to create my own, what size brass rod would I buy? Again, I am looking not have to size the diameter but be able to use readily available stock... do not have a metal lathe.

 

Or, do I have the whole thing wrong :)

 

Thanks for the help.

 

Richard.

Edited by rtropp

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Rchard, the major diameters given are the outside of he threads. You should reduce the rods to that diameter before trying to thread them with the die. If the rod is oversized it will bind in the die. Also if the rod diameter is too large the threaded rod o.d. will be too large and will not turn smoothly in the threaded hole. If you do not have a lathe to turn the rods, you can chuck them in a drill and reduce the diameter with a flat file (or even with sandpaper -but the file is better.) If you search the web for "screw thread dimensions" you should find some diagrams showing the various thread measurements.

 

Ed

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Rchard, has your last post been moved? I had a notice for it. Certainly no problem to start another thread, however, if your questons are related to Naiad book content, I suggest you post them here because I follow this thread. I do not follow all the other threads regularly and so will be unlikely to respond to questons there. Just so you know.

 

Your questions on taps and dies are certainly more genral in nature so I am sure you will get good responses on other threads.

 

Ed

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Ed,

I appreciate all your help.

I realized that I do not know enough about operations involved in using the tap and die. I thought (erroneously) that I could just find brass rod that was the correct size to use. (like if I bought a 1/4 inch die, I could just use a 1/4 inch brass rod.) I think I now understand this better and will try the file method you described.

 

But, especially if my retirement is interrupted by this next contract, I will be considering a small metal lathe. I am just having too much fun with all this. Once I have my skills honed some more, and create the tools I will need, I should be ready to buy wood to begin my build of the Naiad.

 

I was going to start the tap and die thread to stop clogging up your thread with this kind of detail. I ended am being called to meetings so will have to wait for that.

 

Again, much thanks for your time and patience.

 

Richard

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Richard,

 

You are welcome, Richard. I am glad to help.

 

You may want to consider starting with the simpler clamps. You can probably buy a 6-32 tap and 6-32 threaded brass rod at your local hardware store and certainly on Amazon.com. These clamps are easy to make and will work as well as the more complex ones in most situations. Of course the others can be a fun as well as a challenging project. I found it so.

 

If you can't find the items you need, try this website.

 

http://www.mscdirect.com/

 

If MSC doesn't have it, they probably don't make it when it comes to tools, etc.

 

They used to mail their encycopedia sized catalog on request, but here is a link to their online version:

 

http://www.mscdirect.com/FlyerView?contentPath=/sales-catalogs/big-book

 

Browsing through this will give you an idea of their products and can also be an education in itself.

 

I have had very good experience with them.

 

Good luck.

 

Ed

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A good place to find taps is Victor Machinery Exchange. A 4-40 left hand HSS hand tap costs $4.90. The 4-40 right hand tap  is $3.95.

 

http://www.victornet.com/index.html

 

Threaded brass rod in 3ft lengths can be found at MSC Industrial supply. Size 4-40 price is $3.59 each:

 

http://www.mscdirect.com/

Edited by PETERPETER

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Hi,

I just received a 6" length of 6-32 threaded rod from eBay. Also have received a set of the 6-32 tap and die, and the right and left 4-40 sets from Victornet. Victornet is very reasonable. So I will be working on the simpler clamp (as soon as I finish the deck planking I am working on.

 

I just checked MSCDirect and there prices look good. I will probably use them once I am ready for larger length rods.

 

Thanks for the links, very helpful.

 

Richard

Edited by rtropp

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Richard, when I made the "simpler" clamps, I thought of a little improvement along the lines of the machinist clamps, that is to insert a small washer between the upper jaw of the clamp and the top of the threaded rod. This will improve the cleanness of the design and the effectiveness of the clamping. To do this you need to reduce the diameter of the rod just enough to allow a small washer to be inserted and for a such a length that allows a small portion to protrude from the top of the upper jaw to place the handle. The attached picture should make it clear.

Salvatore    

post-860-0-43178500-1392022109_thumb.jpg

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