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Which knots to used for specifics applications ?

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Hi,

 

My modeling ship library in increasing and I have one problem. When to use specific knots for specific use. Lots of book show the basic of knotting, often don't show how to finished the ending of it. Furthermore, it is a mess to understand where on my ship to use specific knots, except for the well known specific knots for shroud and deadeyes.

 

There is my question : Can we found a dedicated book or PDF or video to show the complete knotting action for all the specific knots in used for ship modelling and indicating where to used it ?

 

Yes, really a newbie question, but my head is not able to make classified all the information found.

 

Thanks

 

 

MIchel

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The Asley 'book of knots' has them all.

However: as scale rope is often 'out of scale', the real knots can look quite clumsy.

There is also a website with 'animated knots' showing how to tie the most common ones.

 

Jan

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Michel,

This is a great subject to bring up.   I would love to see a single source with a complete list of  types of knots and where they would be used.  There are many sources showing how different types of knots are tied, but I have not seen as many that show where they are used.    

 

Jan, The Ashley book looks to be a great source, albeit, not cheap.   It is definitely going on my Christmas list or better I can buy it for my wife's birthday and then borrow it

from her.  :>)    

 

Michel,  check out  Knots, Splices, and Rope Work, a Practical Treatise by Alpheus Hyatt Verrill, originally published in 1944.  Only a few dollars from multiple sources. 

 

Lees gives good illustrations of quite a few knots and how they are used as well in Masting and Rigging , but certainly not complete.  Probably enough for most model builders though.

 

Allan

 

 

 

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Thanks Allan,

 

I found the Alpheus Hyatt Verrill kindle book at 0,99 $ on amazon.ca. I had purchased before the Lee book. A great book. But, we have to search a lot with some acetaminophen...

 

Thanks for the tips.

 

Michel

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"Ashley's" is widely available and entertaining, given the many pen and ink illustrations. It is organized by the various trades that use the various knots.

 

Ashley's Book of Knots, in an early edition, at least, is in the public domain and available online for free: https://archive.org/details/TheAshleyBookOfKnots/page/n15/mode/2up

 

The Encyclopedia of Knots and Fancy Ropework by Hensel and Graumont is a more scholarly work organized by the mechanics of the various knot types, e.g. "hitches," "knots," "sennits," "turksheads," etc.  

 

They both have about the same huge number of knots covered. Ashley's has better instructions on tying some knots. Hensel and Graumont show how the basic knot is tied with arrows and diagrams, but assume that once you've learned the basic knot, you can figure out the various variations on each knot on your own.

 

For ship modeling purposes, I've found googling around in YouTube for videos on surgical knots and fly-tying to be a good source of tricks, particularly the use of tweezers and forceps as tying tools for micro-surgical knots. There's lots of tricks in the surgical knot subject matter area.

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There are very few actual knots used on a ship. The most used are the square knot and the Matthew Walker knot, which is a variation on a wall and crown, also common as a stopper knot for the end of a line.

 

The others are hitches like the clove, cow, timber, and rolling hitch: bends like the becket bend: splices like the round, long, cont, and grommet: and seizings like the round,throat, and racking seizings. There are also different lashings as in the rose lashing.

 

Knots are primarily used to form a stopper on the end of a line.

Hitches and bends are used to join two ropes in a removable fashion.

Splices join ropes more permanently or form loops in a line

Seizings and lashings marry two items together.

 

Regards,

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“The Young Sea Officer’s Sheet Anchor” by Darcy Lever. A practical guide to all things rigging.

 

For The basics of Knots, try “The Boy Scout Handbook” or the “Pioneering Merit Badge” book published by The Boy Scouts of America. 

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1 hour ago, popeye2sea said:

There are very few actual knots used on a ship. The most used are the square knot and the Matthew Walker knot, which is a variation on a wall and crown, also common as a stopper knot for the end of a line.

 

The others are hitches like the clove, cow, timber, and rolling hitch: bends like the becket bend: splices like the round, long, cont, and grommet: and seizings like the round,throat, and racking seizings. There are also different lashings as in the rose lashing.

 

Knots are primarily used to form a stopper on the end of a line.

Hitches and bends are used to join two ropes in a removable fashion.

Splices join ropes more permanently or form loops in a line

Seizings and lashings marry two items together.

 

Regards,

Tanks You so much. I Will be  able now to concentrate my research  on these ones. I am sure that I have them in my library. 

 

Regards,

 

Michel

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Knots and hitches haven't actually changed over at least the past couple of hundred, if not thousand years, so basically any modern book or Web-site on the subject will do. However, there are, of course, applications that have gone out of use on modern boats because the respective elements of the rigging are not used anymore.

 

I found in practice that one uses only a handfull or two of them in real life and perhaps even fewer on models. So one should not get too perplexed by the subject.

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On 7/1/2020 at 4:44 AM, allanyed said:

Michel,  check out  Knots, Splices, and Rope Work, a Practical Treatise by Alpheus Hyatt Verrill, originally published in 1944.  Only a few dollars from multiple sources.

This work is also available on gutenberg.org to download in epub or kindle formats.

 

If you don't have an epub reader, howtogeek has a short article with some suggestions or you can get a plug in for your browser. There are also online epub to pdf converters.

 

Mark

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Thanks, I have found it. However, I do not miss some good book on knottings, etc. Just the when and where for  modelism.

 

Good evenning.

 

Michel

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