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12 minutes ago, Egilman said:

That's your problem right there, it's giving you a smooth finish BEFORE you put the color on.... Some paints need the rough texture of the flat finish to be flat..... And, all paint lines have various colors with this issue, It's the main reason I use nothing but dead flats for primers and separate gloss coats for anything that needs to be shiny.....

 

Good gloss paints will gloss over flat primer but they go on thick.... that is what I have to watch out for... Hence, I paint in nothing but flats unless I have to use a gloss because it's the only way to get the specific color....

Thank you bro,    wonder if its an error with the primer  (should be flat out of the bottle)  it doesn't say  there is a difference  -  just checked  mine says its a Matt  formular, bet its that  - thats not mixed enough or a  dudd one.

 

OC.

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Just  gave my primer bottle a Right shake  - then unscrewed the cap  "good I can get inside it"   then used my long brush handle and gave the inside a good stir,   I then got one of my unpainted figures and gave it a quick light coat with my brush  - need to wait for it to dry to see if its gone flat.

 

OC.

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Evening all, so first things first I tried a trick  that EG told me  -  I gathered together the finished figures, found my Tamiya rattle can clear laquare  and went in the garden (but remembering to close the door behind me)  then I used my plastic box to carry them - after a good shake of the can I gave each one a gentle spray and returned them to the box to dry.

 

Well this evening after giving them a few hours to dry - I was able to handle them and  just to make sure I gave each a gentle blast from the hairdryer  -  "Perfect Job"   thanks to EG's  recomendation.

 

I was then able to touch up any small bits of brasswork  or flat white.

 

So these are what I consider completely finish  and ready to go in the unit.

(Please excuse the pic  - it was a quick shot while my phone was on charge in the kitchin)

 

OC.

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24 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

So the secret is the hair dryer.  You're figures look great.  

Mark  the secret was  - putting up with the satin paint finish  then spraying the clear flat coat  over them with taimya clear  laquare  (as its brilliant - used it on my plane builds)  then touching up any  shiny bits  when the top coat has dried  - with me that was a few hours.

 

EG suggested it  - I owe him a drink.

 

OC.

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21 minutes ago, GrandpaPhil said:

Nicely done on the figures!

 

I haven’t had any Victrix miniatures, but the last set of Perry miniatures that I had were excellent.

 

Hope the knee is feeling better.  That is very painful.  Sorry to hear about that.

Thank you kindly Phil,   yep the Perry ones are better than Victrix  - especially  the British ones.

 

OC.

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nice progress on the figures OC.......enamel flats are the same.........always seem to dry with a slight sheen.  what I do is add enough thinner to deaden it.  one drawback to it though,  is it opens the door to ghosting.   with the airbrush it's not to noticeable........but with a brush,  it's terrible.   not too sure about acrylics....I've not in the habit of using them.   the figures look really good....your doing a stellar job with them :)    hope your knee is better!

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2 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

nice progress on the figures OC.......enamel flats are the same.........always seem to dry with a slight sheen.  what I do is add enough thinner to deaden it.  one drawback to it though,  is it opens the door to ghosting.   with the airbrush it's not to noticeable........but with a brush,  it's terrible.   not too sure about acrylics....I've not in the habit of using them.   the figures look really good....your doing a stellar job with them :)    hope your knee is better!

Thank you so much Denis  - yep paint is a funny thing  but I think I have it sussed now, the knee is still painful to touch  (I  go "ouch"  when our dog jumps on my lap and puts her paws on my knee)   but its ok to walk on.

 

OC.

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It's a treat, Denis. Pull the trigger, snap goes the hammer(this was a percussion cap style), one sec or so, bang and a cloud of sulfurous smoke envelopes you. We called 'em smoke sticks. And I think the French pronounce your name Denny. Of course, I could be full of soup, but what else is new, eh?

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17 minutes ago, Canute said:

It's a treat, Denis. Pull the trigger, snap goes the hammer(this was a percussion cap style), one sec or so, bang and a cloud of sulfurous smoke envelopes you. We called 'em smoke sticks. And I think the French pronounce your name Denny. Of course, I could be full of soup, but what else is new, eh?

And dont foreget the deafening noise from the "Bang"  I understand a famous word between troops was  "Pardon"  or  "Whatttttt"

 

OC.

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Those were flintlocks back then. the engineering progression goes Matchlock - Flintlock - Caplock... the percussion cap was the first efficient and truly safe way to fire one of those...

 

Running around with a flintlock was a lot safer than having to run' load and fire handling open gunpowder with a burning match attached to you all the time...

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Trying to effectively handle a muzzleloading musket, or worse yet a rifle in battle  with loose powder is a non-starter.  The answer was cartridges- preloaded powder and ball loaded into a combustable paper tubular envelope.  The drill was to bite off the end of the cartridge, dump the powder down the barrel followed by the ball and wadded up paper, all rammed home.

 

Modern day muzzleloader shooters often swab the barrel between shots.  Soldiers on the battlefield couldn’t do this.  Accounts of Civil War battles often mention muskets picked up after the battle with multiple unfired loads in the barrel and soldiers neglecting to remove their ram rods before firing.  Muskets also became inoperable because of black powder fouling. On the other hand, I have not read of soldiers injured by charges exploding prematurely by unburnt embers left in the barrel.

 

Roger

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in French,  my name is spelt Denise....by pronounced 'Denn'ie'........I used to get teased about it when I was younger.   I might add that some even had the rifle discharge from the back end, into their faces.......it would ultimately explode.  unlike modern firearms,  the powder left significant ash in the breech..........it had to be cleaned out before the next round could be packed.  modern firearms use shells,  which prevents this build up.   I have no doubt that premature firing did occur due to the adrenaline rush of battle.

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