Jump to content

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, GuntherMT said:

The speed that you are moving forward with this makes the quality of the build all the more amazing to me.  Beautiful work as usual.

Thank you for your attention. Being“ efficient,、accurate 、different” has always been the standard for me.:P

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
38 minutes ago, wefalck said:

Looking excellent - as expected !

 

Did you make some sort of jig for soldering the rails on the staircase ?

Balustrade is the part I have redone many times, the highest scrap! I can't believe it took me four days. There was no welding or bonding because the rails were too thin, only 0.35 mm in diameter. For beauty and solidity, I used precision holes to insert a 0.9 mm diameter copper rod. Due to the irregular curvature of the staircase, 7 staircases were scrapped due to the wrong direction. I almost gave up and made it into wood, but wood can't be made too small.:(

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried rivetting ? Jewellers have so-called rivetting wheels, this are kind of hardened steel wheels with a wavy rim that fit into your hand-held drill. You make the hole slightly conical from the outside with a conical reamer and let the stanchion protrude a bit. With the wheel you hammer flat the protrusion without stressing too much the rail. You would probably need a sort of jig to hold the rail in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi wefalck.Thank you for your suggestion, which provided me with a good idea. When machining the locating hole, I use the sine bench clamp to hold the workpiece and adjust it to the required angle to drill the hole. But the installation cost me a lot of time and material. The 0.35 mm brass wire was too soft and bent with a little effort. For me, bending was a waste. In fact, I should have switched to a slightly thicker 0.4 mm pin for better handling (made in Japan) and with a certain amount of tenacity and resistance to bending.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Your skills and build quality continue to amaze bitao; very much enjoy following this log.

 

Eberhard, any chance of a photo of one of those rivet tools; I am having a hard time visualising what you describe :(  I hope you don't mind bitao?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hier is an example of a rivetting wheel as used by jewellers and dental technicians, randomly taken from the internet (Busch is a well-known brand that is internationally available):

 

1673_0.jpg

 

Cutting the grooves into pulley sheaves is easy, you just need to grind youself a pointed lathe tool with a rounded nose.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/20/2021 at 8:56 AM, GuntherMT said:

Beautiful as always, I love those stairs!

 

How did you make the brass pulleys for the sheaves?  They appear to actually be properly dished for the rope, is that true or do my eyes deceive me?

Hello. It is very easy to make these pulleys, but because of the small size, you need to grind a special turning tool. The diameter of the pulleys is 3.5 mm and the thickness is 0.8 mm. It is easy to work on a lathe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rwiederrich said:

Bitao..what was your process in making and scribing the planksheer and moldings around her hull?

 

Rob

I'm very sorry, this process I did not shoot save. Because I don't think there's anything special about it. After processing by hand with a scraper, the same operation as for laying hull slats. It's just that the three-dimensional curve of the tail is really hard to bend.

 

DSC02953.JPG.0fee8dae23280ce37c7819cc4f595fae.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Your draw tool is amazing...and it contains the scribes of many molding designs...I need to make one of those for sure.

 

One other crucial question I must ask...how did you overcome the issue of bending the stern molding both longitudely and and sagittally? 

 

Making both of those curves in one trim can be  extremely difficult.

 

I'm also assuming you used the jig itself as the depth gauge?

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wereverich, here's the thing. Your problems are our problems, too. It is very difficult to bend wood lengthwise, especially boards. If we are not careful, it will twist and break the shape we need. To be sure, the fixture is not only inefficient, but also difficult to achieve the final effect. After a lot of practice, I usually use the method of heating and carefully repeating after soaking in the water for a certain time. The advantage of this method is that I can get the shape and effect I need more quickly, and the fit is higher. Just need to master a certain skill and order, otherwise it is easy to scrap. Usually I make the fixture for this, is to meet the bending in place, the need to cut the line. Because before heating and bending, all carving line processing is futile.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for kinda explaining it.

I build my models out of multi-media...utilizing whatever  material I can find and that may mean wood, plastic, metal, paper, wax, modeling compound...etc,etc,etc.

 

I made my own draw blades and I cut several example styles for my model of Glory of the Seas.

 

Rob

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...