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Stephen Walters

Using ink to simulate tarring in deck planking.

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Good evening from Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I'm new to the forum and new to modeling and just hope I ask questions that make some sense.  I've just started my build of the Bluenose II by Artesania Latina.  Eventually, I will be edge marking the deck planks to simulate deck tarring.  A number of modelers I've talked to say stay away from edge marking with any pencil lead because it leaves indelible smudges after sanding.  Others recommend marker pens.  I've tried some marker pens but the ink weeps away from the edges onto the tops of small test planks I'm using.  The test planks I'm using come from the 0.6 mm x 5 mm basswood planks in the AL kit.  Can of any of you experienced modelers recommend inks that won't smudge on sanding, or if that is unfeasible, recommend other ways to edge mark the planks?

 

One way or another, I'm going to build this exquisite model.  It is so beautiful.

 

Stephen Walters 

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Welcome to MSW Stephen,

Black tissue gift wrap paper works beautifully.  You can get a package at a craft store like Michaels for a under $2US and it  will last a long time.   The appearance is much more clear than pencil or inked edges but does take a little more time than the pencil or inking method.  If the scale is smaller, such as 1:98,  I would go with pencil or marker ink.  

Allan

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6 minutes ago, allanyed said:

Black tissue gift wrap paper works beautifully. 

Allan, I have been fiddling around with paper and so far I am making a mess of it. I really like the results others have achieved with paper and hoped it would pop up in this thread. Is there a description somewhere of how to get it right?

 

Thanks,

Bruce

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Wow, this is a live forum!  Love that idea about the black thread, Sweep.  Your Bounty deck looks awesome.  The black tissue paper looks intriguing, Allen.  Like Bruce indicated, I also would like to find a description of how to use tissue paper for edging.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Stephen

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Stephen For the tissue I apply a light coat of white or yellow glue to one  edge of the plank.  If it is to be tapered, make sure that is done first.   Lay the plank with the glued edge onto the paper which should be on a flat surface.  It will dry in a few minutes.  I use a scalpel, as the blades are sharper and cheaper than  Xacto  blades, to cut the the plank away from the sheet, them trim any excess paper left hanging.  Sorry I do not have any photos that would make it easier to describe.  If this still not enough info, let me know and I will try to make up a couple planks with tissue and take photos.   

 

Allan

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Hi, Allen.  Many, many thanks for defining the procedure.  It is clear and concise.  I will try it and will use a scalpel instead of an Xacto blade.  In the meantime, if you have a few minutes, posting some photos showing the procedure would help immeasurably.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Stephen

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2 hours ago, allanyed said:

Lay the plank with the glued edge onto the paper,,,

Sometimes the obvious needs to be said. Your way makes so much more sense than my 'take-the-paper-to-the-plank' attempts.

Thanks,

Bruce

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I’m in the pencil camp.

 

one thing to consider if you’ve not already: experiment with the different techniques before applying them to the model itself.  I saw other modelers posting mockups and test runs and it kinda struck me as a blinding flash of the obvious: we can practice things!

 

good luck!

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I have used both thread and pencil, but prefer pencil because it is easier to do and I like that you do not end up with clean lines. Although you may get (light) smudging when sanding, I like the look after staining with light oak. Maybe without staining it is less attractive so that could be a deciding factor.  Picture below is the stained deck using pencil.

20200730_161004.jpg

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41 minutes ago, Stephen Walters said:

Ah, good idea, Gregory.  I'll try it.

 

Stephen

PS

Here is a post I made with an image of my method..

 

 

 

Just running the pencil over the exposed edge corner is all that is needed.  The actual face of the edge will never be seen.

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28 minutes ago, Pete Jaquith said:

Stephen,

 

I have had good success with a non-bleed fabric marker "FabricMate" from Jo Ann Fabrics.

 

Regards from the shipyard,

Pete

DSCN8845.JPG

image0091.jpg

 

image0165.jpg

26 minutes ago, Pete Jaquith said:

Stephen,

 

I have had good success with a non-bleed fabric marker "FabricMate" from Jo Ann Fabrics.

 

Regards from the shipyard,

Pete

DSCN8845.JPG

image0091.jpg

 

image0165.jpg

3 hours ago, PietFriet said:

I have used both thread and pencil, but prefer pencil because it is easier to do and I like that you do not end up with clean lines. Although you may get (light) smudging when sanding, I like the look after staining with light oak. Maybe without staining it is less attractive so that could be a deciding factor.  Picture below is the stained deck using pencil.

20200730_161004.jpg

 

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#2 should work. 

 

You will find there is a lot of trial & error, experimentation and such with this hobby.

 

Remember you can always take a few pieces of deck planking and try things before hand.

 

I would think your model is a 1/64 scale and at that scale the caulking would be very, very narrow. So narrow that some believe it isn't necessary.

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44 minutes ago, CPDDET said:

You will find there is a lot of trial & error, experimentation and such with this hobby.

 

Remember you can always take a few pieces of deck planking and try things before hand.

By following this suggestion you will find the results of your wood, your glue and your sanding/scraping materials. All three affect the outcome and you may find that you just don't like carrying out a particular process despite liking the results other builders have produced.

I sympathise, and a few experiments with the scrap wood from your kit will tell you a lot. 

 

 

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When I built my MS Smoothbore Cannon, I used a Sharpie "Permanent" marker for the caulking. Big mistake! After I glued the decking to the ply subdeck, the marker ink ran al over the place while the glue dried ovenight. Had to remove the planks and start again. MS sent me a new set of deck planks free.

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Mercy!  I have thought of using a Sharpie marker, but am also thinking of just using a No. 2 pencil.  I think I will just leave the Sharpie alone.  Thank you so much for your reply.  You may have saved me from making a terrible mistake.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Stephen Walters

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26 minutes ago, Gregory said:

Is there a chance the paint will bleed into the wood and not just show up on the edge?

I would definitely coat the wood with a thin coat of shellac to prevent absorption of black paint into the wood. (It would probably be less of a problem if you sprayed the black paint, but why take a chance?)

 

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