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Greek Galliot by Sceatha - 1/64 - Amati plans with modifications


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You're right George. There is a transom in the stern although the bow follows the shape of a typical trechantiri's hull.
Well, it was not common but yes there were cases where in Gr. traditional shipbuilding,  transformations appeared  in a typical shape of a hull. These hulls-boats were called "Bastards" or "Mule" and were being built for certain use purposes ...
However I haven't hear or found anything about a Trechantiri with transom in Aegean Sea. 
So I can only guesses for what reason this occurred in some Gr. boats in Tarpon Springs.
One could be that it's been kept the transom from the original Symi's hull Skaphe, avoiding the narrow bow of her (as it was "Tserniki" hull with pointed prow), gaining this way space.
Another one could be the adjustment in the local sea conditions.
After all, you know the Gr. innovative spirit...:)
As about the rigging and although must be an engine in the boat, it's been kept Skaphe's mizzen. I guess again for the same reason as the initial one, where when a diver was at the seafloor, the captain (the boat) had to follow him by skillful handling of the tiller and the mizzen... 
Thx for the rostrum...

c012491.jpg.d1903e83c8f247f291840f5ba23e88bd.jpg

Edited by Thanasis
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Thank you @Kevin, welcome aboard!

 

And thank you @Thanasis for the great info (as always!)

 

I always wondered about the tiny mizzen of the Skaphe, it does make sense that it was used for close quarters maneuverability during a dive. Also great to see that it was maintained, even on a relatively recent boat with an engine.

 

The abundance of different traditional craft that have been used in the Aegean will never cease to amaze me!

 

Meanwhile on the galliot, not much to show for now, just cutting, soldering and blackening brass and copper with Brass Black:

 

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Since the time I worked with plastic models there is a lesson that I have failed to learn again and again. My obsessive character will not allow me the rest if I do not fix a mistake, so I should not ignore things that my gut feeling tells me are not OK. Such a time came in this build with the rudder hinges. Since the time I cut them off the brass sheet I knew they were oversized for the scale. I went along with them, but it kept eating me inside. Then a friend (Thanasis from this forum) was kind enough to point it out. That was motivation enough to go back and fix it.

 

Only issue was that this "late" fix caused a bit of damage on the surrounding wood (as was to be expected) which I will have to address later, nothing major though.

 

Totally worth it! Both for the model's appearance and my sanity 😄

 

A photo of the resized hinges before the damage to the wood is addressed:

 

1658211057_rudder(8).thumb.jpg.a3b9f7387437c25c570f7922467c4be6.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, Sceatha said:

My obsessive character will not allow me the rest if I do not fix a mistake,

Oh gosh, I share the same character trait and it is both a blessing and a curse. It's a blessing when I finally attempt to fix the problem and it turns out well and it's a curse when my attempted fix is worse than the original problem. I'm trying to learn to step back a bit and know when "good enough" is enough...but it's so hard for me to do!

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20 hours ago, druxey said:

Ah - a true ship modeler! Can't let it go until it's right. And, of course, it looks so much better now.

 

Thank you Druxey, don't feel like a true ship modeller yet, as I feel a true ship modeller would measure correctly the first time, but hopefully I am on the right path. 😄

 

14 hours ago, BobG said:

Oh gosh, I share the same character trait and it is both a blessing and a curse. It's a blessing when I finally attempt to fix the problem and it turns out well and it's a curse when my attempted fix is worse than the original problem. I'm trying to learn to step back a bit and know when "good enough" is enough...but it's so hard for me to do!

 

I know exactly what you mean Bob! What I find helps is reminding myself that (luckily) this is my hobby, there is no deadline and all the standards are set by myself. So I can remake the same thing a million times until I get it right. I am not making less mistakes, the models just take more time to finish. 😄

It's an awful feeling, looking at a finished model and only being able to see that one mistake that only you remember.

Edited by Sceatha
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Quote

It's an awful feeling, looking at a finished model and only being able to see that one mistake that only you remember.

Well, in fact there is a way to correct a mistake and remember it without feeling bad...Change its  artistic presence....:)

Thx

https://modelshipworld.com/topic/4157-my-greek-state-of-mind/?tab=comments#comment-118069

 

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1 hour ago, Thanasis said:

Well, in fact there is a way to correct a mistake and remember it without feeling bad...Change its  artistic presence....:)

Thx

https://modelshipworld.com/topic/4157-my-greek-state-of-mind/?tab=comments#comment-118069

 

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That is a great idea Thanasis!

 

Though I am afraid if I had to "rescue" every one of my own failed attempts in this manner I would soon run out of walls. 😄

 

 

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13 hours ago, Sceatha said:

 

Thank you Druxey, don't feel like a true ship modeller yet, as I feel a true ship modeller would measure correctly the first time, but hopefully I am on the right path. 😄

 

 

I don't know of anyone who measures perfectly the first time.  The usual method seems to be measure several times and then cut.  Even still, mistakes happem.

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12 hours ago, mtaylor said:

 

I don't know of anyone who measures perfectly the first time.  The usual method seems to be measure several times and then cut.  Even still, mistakes happem.

 

Trying to get used to that Mark, for some reason a mistake in the plans can sometimes "mesmerize" me and I end up following the plans, even against common sense. 😄

 

Good thing with our hobby is that everything is fixable if you have the time and patience.

 

Meanwhile in the build I spent a fun day cutting and soldering brass rings:

 

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One of the golden rules: when building any type of galley it's never too late to start working on some oars, otherwise you will end up with a complete ship and then have to build all the oars at once.

 

I happened to have several 3mm beech dowels hanging around, so I started with those.

 

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17 hours ago, Thanasis said:

My golden rule when I have to build many same items, is to be innovative and creative

avoiding working on one of those at a time. :)

Thx

 

Normally I think the same way Thanasis. Now with the lock down though, spending much more time at home, I find ways to kill time. 😄

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The impressive bowsprit is now in place. Too impressive in fact if you ask me. Lateen rigs do not usually have need for a long bowsprit unless they rig a fore staysail, which this one doesn't. Could it have occasionally been used for ramming? Ramming attacks by pirate vessels have definitely been reported in the Aegean at the time.

 

A bit of rigging also visible in the photos, more on that soon...

 

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