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Thank you for your comments everyone, I really appreciate it.

Keith,

Thank you very much for your comment on the wheel, I really am grateful for you pointing this out.   I double checked the wheel dimensions against the drawings and you are correct, the rim is  0.14" wide.  The drawings show the rim at  0.12 wide.  I have no idea how I missed this.   Over all diameter is good, but the rim is too beefy.    I will definitely check with the builder to see if this is OK or if I need a redo.   In making the model, I have found several potential problems with their drawings and the builders have been very receptive to receiving my notes on these.   Please keep in mind this vessel has yet to be built in real life, (they are looking for investors now for the first one) so some things on the drawings may change.   

 

One note for now.    I took the hull outside in bright sunlight to start spray painting the hull.   I have never done this in the past, always doing things under shop lights.   Tiny, and I mean tiny, spaces in a few places between strakes showed up that I never noticed under shop lights.   As the hull will be painted, it is not a problem to fill this with sawdust and glue then sand it and then paint, but I will be checking all my planking on any model I do in the future, strake by strake, in bright sunlight.  No doubt my old eyes have something to do with this, being able to read without readers when outdoors in the sun, but no way when under artificial light.  

 

Allan

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Thanks everyone.

Keith, I laughed out loud when I read your suggestion.  It is a good one!!! 

Druxey, I totally agree that a point of light, be it a bulb or otherwise does work when holding up the item to put the light behind it, but outdoors in bright sun really showed up things quickly and painfully. not painlessly, that were less noticeable indoors.  This tells me more light in the shop is probably a good idea  😁

Allan

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  • 2 weeks later...

While coats of paint on the hull dry, some metal work was done.   I have been using brass and silver soldering with no issues.   As this is a modern day schooner, there will be jib furlers used.   This took some research to understand how they work and what they look like as these were totally new items for me.  Making the parts took a little doing on the lathe,  but in the end I was able to make each of them in two pieces soldered together.    

The saddles and other parts for the booms were pretty straight forward to make and solder.   I softened the brass before shaping, cut and filed to shape, then soldered.   Everything was then  pickled for an hour   and hit with steel wool before finishing.   

 

Allan

 

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The hull is painted and the rudder and prop mounted.    Few spots need a touch up, but in pretty good shape so far.     The upper roller for the jib furler needs a pickling bath before getting blackened.   The deck house is unusual (for me at least) in that it has curved bulkheads running fore and aft, thus the shape of the beams in the photo.  These bulkheads will fay to the inboard side of the fore and aft beaming, leaving a solid landing for the deck planking on top of the beams.   Based on the architect's drawings,  the top edge  of the red bottom paint is not perfectly horizontal.  It lies 0.25" above the water line aft. 0.20" above the water line midships,  and 0.38" above the water line forward.   The stripe follows the sheer line of the deck.

Allan

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Thanks to all of you for your comments.   I am always very interested to hear of any questions/concerns/mistakes I've made in order to make improvements in my never ending journey towards the quality of a Greg,  David, Keith, Gary, Chuck, Ed and many other artists out there.  I have huge doubts about ever reaching that goal, but there is a lot of fun and satisfaction being gained during the trip itself even if the end is still nowhere in sight.

 

Allan

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On 9/29/2020 at 12:25 PM, allanyed said:

   I softened the brass before shaping, cut and filed to shape, then soldered. 

Good progress Allan. The none level waterline is an interesting feature, it is beyond my comprehension why the builders would do that, do you know why?

i find your comment about softening the brass before machining it very interesting, particularly as I have seen the same comment in another build log recently. I have always preferred the machining characteristics of hard brass, even to the extent of avoiding the use of soft brass whenever possible. The only time I soften brass is when I want to deform or bend it. However I am now wondering whether I am missing something? 

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Hi Keith,

Sorry for causing some confusion/miscommunication.   When machining on the lathe, for example, I just go with the hardened brass.  I only soften the brass pieces that need to be bent into shape such as the saddles, goosenecks, &c.    For the cutting and filing  of sheet material,  for example, I have never really noticed much difference, if any between softened and hard brass.  

 

Regarding the waterline, I have not asked the architect about this feature.  He has been extremely difficult to reach as he just about lives in the Ernestina while they are rebuilding her so I have limited my questions  for now.    I am curious to know about this myself.    Hopefully will have that mystery solved down the road a bit.   

 

Allan

 

 

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Some up to date photos.   White is the theme on this schooner with touches of tans and reds so I have been using a combination of poplar for things to be painted, castello for tan unpainted finish including the deck planking and cherry for the cap rail.   There will be a number of trim pieces in red so will likely go with cherry or perhaps Swiss pear.  I gave Chuck Passaro's method of bending planks for the cap rail and waterways and must say I was pleased.  Being able to cut clean planks then bending rather than cutting curved pieces was a nice change.   I did soak the pieces first and I used two hold downs in the center portion of the board during the bending.  I used the boss' iron and used the steam setting as on my first test pieces the wood started to discolor when done dry.  Probably too much heat, but the steam did the trick.   I did trace the curve on paper and transferred it to the heating/bending board as a guide as the curves were not true arcs.  Once released from the makeshift jig the pieces held their shape very well. I decided to go with cherry for the cap rail, but found I could not use cherry for the trennals as they were much too brittle and would not go through the draw plate at the smallest diameter that I needed.  I opted for pear for the trennals and their cross section matches very closely to the color of the rail.   Once sealed and top coated they will show, but should be nicely subtle.  More photos of these in the next post.     Note that the deck house bulkheads are loose at this point as there is some finish work to do before fixing them in place.

 

Note that it looks otherwise in the first  photo, but the door to the head will swing fully open with plenty of room to spare.   

 

Does anyone know of  book they can recommend on rigging "modern" schooners.   I can try to go take a look at some at the local marinas but I doubt they have very many, if any that are this large.  The plans that I have from the architect shows the blocks and basic lines, but there are a lot of details that I would like to study if there are any good books available.

Allan

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Regarding the non-level waterline....I recall reading about that somewhere else, though I apologize I have no idea where.  As I recall it is just an aesthetic choice to counteract an optical illusion.  With some hull shapes, a perfectly level waterline can actually appear as if it droops down at the bow and stern, so they raise the ends of the waterline up just a  bit to make it look level to the eye.

 

Very nice build so far, looking forward to seeing more progress.

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Very clean work Allan. I’m finding this vessel really interesting. I’m sort of assuming a vessel of this size has fairly extensive below deck spaces and this is prompting me to wonder why on earth the deck cabin space is being compromised to facilitate the fitting of a toilet pan and sink ( particularly as they eliminate the possibility of forward views from the cabin). Instruments, chart tables, gin cupboards all seem better candidates for deckhouse space. Does anyone have any insights into this novel prioritisation of facilities?

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Keith,  The way they explained it to me is that the idea of the vessel is for day trips with pretty large groups and it is outfitted for wheel chair access which has not been done before.  In addition to the aft cabin, the forward cabin has bench seating for 16 persons plus 4  chairs.  There are also benches on deck for 24 including the enclosed benches just aft of the head.  The deck seating will be more clear on the build photos in a few days, but I am not doing the inside for the forward cabin.   The aft cabin top is removable so they can take it off and show the head and ramps to prospective investors.    I saw no sense in furnishing the forward cabin and they said it was not necessary as it is just seating and such and shows clearly on the architects plans.    To paraphrase Alfred Lord Tennyson in The Charge of the Light Brigade mine is not to question why, mine but to .......     :>) 

Allan 

 

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, allanyed said:

The way they explained it to me is that the idea of the vessel is for day trips with pretty large groups and it is outfitted for wheel chair access which has not been done before.

 

Allan, I did wonder whether it was to facilitate wheelchair access - very commendable. My sailing days are behind me but I do know that the tack that the boat is on is fairy important when choosing the head to occupy (port or starboard). Presumably the crew won't mind changing tacks to assist sailors with limited mobility.

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Keith, Hope you are right for the day sailors they take out.

 

Druxey, so starting so early in your life delving into ship modeling  was what led you to becoming the virtuoso in ship modeling as well as the other arts I know you have succeeded in over the years.   Alas, my first wooden model was about 1959 or so and was a POB balsa disaster.  Then I took the big step and jumped back in in 1978 and stayed with it pretty much continuously ever since.  Couple hiatus in there somewhere before the internet.  But, even today with Boothbay 65, it is a never ending learning experience for which I am grateful and thank you and the many others that have shared so much with us.   

Allan 

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The deck is planked and the deck furniture in place.   The skylights on the forward cabin area (which is set up as a classroom for twenty students) did not come out as I wished so will be a do-over.   The top of the aft cabin can be removed to view the inside area and worked out as I had hoped.

 

For finishing the deck planks  I mostly used a scraper  to remove high spots then sand paper finish and still find this preferable to any other methods I have tried in the past.  I know this is common methodology, but for those who have not tried it, it is worth a go.  Stiff backed razors or even a  chisel can be used as a scraper if there is not a scraper already in the shop. 

 

Note there are side benches midships that seat 8 per side as well as the bench area going down into the aft cabin.   The back rests in this aft seating area are sitting loosely at this point but will give an idea on their shape.  These took a bit of doing as I had to start with a block of wood and cut, carve and sand to get the shape required.  There was no way to bend these as they are quite thick at the forward area where they make a 90 degree bend.   Not sure I like the design of these rests, but they do match the drawings.

 

There is a bit of clean up with a scraper and sand paper, but nothing major, mostly finger prints/dirt/pencil reference marks/small glue spots which will definitely show once a clear coat finish is put down. Photos really help spot otherwise unnoticed items to clean up and other faux pax.    


After the final cleaning up should she should be ready to start masts, booms, sails and rigging.  Going to give my first try using silk span and have been studying the supplement in Volume IV of TFFM on making sails with silk span.   I had always used maximum thread count cloth in the past, but want to see how well this method compares.   

Allan

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