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Ripping Planks - what I've learned from others


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Glenn,

 

Thanks for taking the time to share your learnings and contribute to discussion on this subject. As you say, there are many ways to tackle this task and yours is clearly a valid way. I personally use a jig very similar to the one shown and described by Kurt, and I have also used a method similar to that described by Mark Taylor. All of them are valid. All of them are safe as long as you follow appropriate precautions for your chosen method.

 

Please don’t regret your original post based on a few ill-considered comments. The rest of us appreciate your contribution.

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I've been  reading this thread with interest, as I'm going to be making my own planking strips soon.

Unfortunately I don't have a Byrnes saw, but will be using a Proxxon fet, so I assume the method can be applied. 

The idea of a block to keep the wood steady instead of the hand is great.

Thanks Glenn 👍

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46 minutes ago, Edwardkenway said:

Unfortunately I don't have a Byrnes saw, but will be using a Proxxon fe

Edward,

I recently replaced my old microlux with an FET.

I'm still getting familiar with it, but all of Glenn's tips work as well with the FET.

I haven't determined if there is increased clearance at the rear of the fence, but it should be easy to make that happen.

The micrometer-like fence adjustment on the FET is very precise and allows for making fractional mm adjustments.

Hopefully you will be able to get a fine tooth .030 or 0.20 kerf blade for plank ripping.  The included carbide blade is good, but wasteful..

 

 

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I appreciate you taking the time, Glenn, to document your approach to plank ripping.  Although I've been modeling for over 15 years, I still picked up a couple of ideas from your doc that I will use in the future.  I think these types of docs are extremely helpful, especially now for those who are attempting to enter this hobby or are considering it as a result of the pandemic (or whatever) - some people stay away from this hobby due to the perceived notion of how to acquire the skills to do it, and to do it well.  Your doc is an enabler for those new or considering this hobby as well as those of us who are open to learning new ideas.  And, your doc has prompted several others to contribute their ideas as well - which is also really good for all.  So ... good job!!  And don't stop with just one topic please!

 

warthog

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Glenn,

 

Thanks for putting this together.  It is reassuring to know that what I am doing is more or less the same as what you are doing.

 

I think that a good safety tip is to "rehearse the cut".  By which I mean push the wood through without the saw running.  Especially if you haven't used the saw for a while or it is a cut you haven't done for a while. A couple of times I found that I had inadvertently moved the saw or stored something at the exit end that would have stopped the wood exiting freely.

 

John

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Block looks good to hold wood from not moving, but I use feather boards bought from Micro Mart, I cut a piece of Blood wood to slide in grove, used a counter sunk screw to hold, I find I do not get any kick back, and they work great also it gives you both hands to work with and feel how the cut is working and last I use a push stick once it goes passed top feather board just another way of ripping planks.

 

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Regards

Richard

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1 hour ago, Retired guy said:

Block looks good to hold wood from not moving,

Actually the side block is to keep the wood up against the fence and not allow any down or forward pressure from that direction, tight enough to hold it in but not so tight the wood can't move. As I mentioned, use of this side block was a break-through for me getting consistent width planks, before I was inadvertently trying to "steer" the wood with the side hand. It gives me a great feel for the wood, I've had zero kick backs since I adapted the technique as I described it. 

 

There are definitely different ways to do the same thing. I appreciate you sharing your alternative method and glad it works for you. 

 

1 hour ago, bartley said:

Thanks for putting this together.  It is reassuring to know that what I am doing is more or less the same as what you are doing.

I really glad for that. In fact I'm as glad about that as offering others confidence to try it themselves for the first time. One problem of such a diverse group of people on a forum this large is that invariably there are a few that think only theirs is the right way, and who sometimes go so far as to say your way is wrong. I just wish people would simply say as I have "in my opinion" "for me this does this" "another way is" "here is another alternative" .... 

 

I wanted to present what I've learned to help people by simply providing a choice, though one I know works and is supported by its use by others far more skilled than I am. Which is why the title of the post includes "what I learned from others."

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Well my Byrnes saw arrived today 

 

I'll be setting up and testing over the weekend. I'll need to re-read this thread and see what works for me. I expect as I use it more I'll tweak it to find "my way of doing it". 

 

I also need to find some wood to practice on.

 

Glenn, thanks for doing this thread.

 

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15 minutes ago, glbarlow said:

I'm sure you'll enjoy it, and glad I helped as your find your way. The first step is to change the blade, I've never used the one that came with the saw - I could cut 2x4s with that thing.

Actually I'm planning to use that blade first :). I have some random pieces of 3/4" maple hardwood flooring. I'm going to cut some strips off these then use them for practice. After that I don't expect to be using the blade often (if at all).

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1 hour ago, glbarlow said:

I'm sure you'll enjoy it, and glad I helped as your find your way. The first step is to change the blade, I've never used the one that came with the saw - I could cut 2x4s with that thing.

Glenn,

It sounds like you only do ripping using the slitting blade. Of course that is what your post is about.  The blade which comes with the machine is a cross-cut blade which I use quite a bit.  Magic for cutting reproducible lengths.  Incidentally I found that a zero clearance insert for the slitting blade improved the quality of my ripped planks enormously especial if I was cutting narrow ones,

 

John

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46 minutes ago, bartley said:

cutting reproducible lengths.

Yes, you’re correct, the post was limited to ripping planks, there are many other things the Byrnes saw does well.  I have done plenty of cross-cutting, I’m a big fan of the sliding table accessory for those reproducible cuts.  I’m sure I’ll be at it again now that my Cheerful planking is complete and I move to the next phase. 

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Thank you all for the methods used to cut planks! I was lucky enough to find a Byrnes saw locally that was bought a year earlier and it just wasn't that applicable to the type of work he was using it for. I saw the ad on Craig's list and for nearly half off the new price, I drove 2.5 hours to check it out. Fantastic shape so I did buy it. I called Jim Byrnes and spoke to his wonderful wife (very, very nice!) and she confirmed the sale to the guy I bought it from. I also ordered the sliding table, more blades and replacement screws, etc. 

 

It's been basically sitting here waiting for me to learn how to use it. Yesterday i cut a 1/32 plank that I was happy with the first half of it (about 20 inches in all). The second 10 inches got thinner. Looks like I need more practice! I bought some bass wood pre milled 1/4 and a bit thicker I think I can use to cut Garboard planks. I'm currently working on that planking course from NRG that recently became available. I've built five or six ships and they look okay but never did the planking the correct way. I want my planks to look like Chuck's and many of yours. 

 

I have built a couple ships that I haven't done a build log (I'm so bad). Actually just been very busy. I admire how you all do such wonderful logs. I recently finished Chucks 18th Century Long Boat and had fun working on it. I am doing better as I learn to plank. Both from the NRG course and watching some of Chuck's videos. In the near future I plan on buying some Boxwood and Alaskan Cedar for planking. Neither readily available. When I'm ready I'll first check with Chuck / Syren. Anyway, great posts and thank you. Ron 

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