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ok i'm seeing the size of the crew boats from Master Korabel, a bit smaller of supplied in the kit but no problem. A looot of work in very small size, i think your boats will be more tricky than the Terror. I need to think about it, very nice boats but i'm not sure about my capabilities... 🤨 

 

best regards !!

 

UPDATE:

i'm seeing the photos of Keith S, with the master korabel boat above the Terror, i want it!!! i'll try to find it in Spain 🤣🤣 

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  • 2 weeks later...

The process continues. I have added the strakes (ice bumpers) to the hull. A lot of sanding. Fortunately we had a spell of good weather and was able to use my dremel outside. I hope that next week I can do the same for the prop enclosure. I painted the inside of the bulwarks Admiralty yellow as suggested one of the build logs. Certainly better than the blood red used on ships of war.

 

My friend who is a mechanical engineer is eager to find out how they attached the propeller and how it was  removed and reinstalled at sea. He has been unable to find any details yet on the mechanisms used.

 

The little ships boats are a serious challenge. The parts a tiny and fragile. The instructions and build method are probably unique, but the whole build is fun if your eyesight is good, you have fine tweezers and your hands do not shake too much.

 

DB

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Progress continues. I had a lot of trouble fitting the stern post, not too certain why, but it is attached and lined up properly. The black stain has been applied and I am beginning to add the deck rails. Of course in the mean time I built a new desktop computer which took a fair amount of time.  Next steps, finish installing the deck rails, paint the ice bumper ( I'm sure there is a better term for that), Start on the deck furniture and source 8mm and 7mm dowels for the main and fore masts.

I read comments here, I think from "clearwater" that the kit masts were not the correct size and the the masts were strapped with iron bands not rope. Is there any data on the position and size of those type of mast reinforcement?

Any info will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

 

DB

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On 10/14/2020 at 3:43 AM, clearway said:

Hi Broden- still looking into the mast bands so still not 100%- saying that there is still so much to do on mine it will be a while till i seriously need to apply some grey matter on the subject.

 

Keith

Hey Keith,

Just stumbled across a .pdf file related to the SS Great Britian that has a good deal of detail of deck fittings including historical stuff. It might be of some value for your research. Here is a link:

 

https://www.ssgreatbritain.org/sites/default/files/kcfinder/files/C Fittings.pdf

 

DB

 

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13 minutes ago, broden said:

Hey Keith,

Just stumbled across a .pdf file related to the SS Great Britian that has a good deal of detail of deck fittings including historical stuff. It might be of some value for your research. Here is a link:

 

https://www.ssgreatbritain.org/sites/default/files/kcfinder/files/C Fittings.pdf

 

DB

 

Actually here is a link to the whole manual.

 

https://www.ssgreatbritain.org/brunel-institute/manual-maritime-curatorship

 

DB

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On 10/14/2020 at 3:43 AM, clearway said:

Hi Broden- still looking into the mast bands so still not 100%- saying that there is still so much to do on mine it will be a while till i seriously need to apply some grey matter on the subject.

 

Keith

 

5 hours ago, clearway said:

Ty Broden, i think terror did not have made/ composite masts which means the bands would only be needed to hold the cheeks each side of the masts. 

 

Keith

Hi clearway, So HMS Terror mast should be fitted with rope bindings as shown in the OcCre plans.

 

As I have said this is my first wood ship model and I am learning and watching what other more experienced modelers are doing.

 

Thanks for the heads up, it is appreciated.

 

DB

 ps I am still getting "Keith" and "Keith S" mixed up.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have spent a lot of time looking at the OcCre plans and images as well as several builds in this forum of the Gallery windows their framing.

I did not like the paint the back boards blue approach or the bulk of the framing. It seemed out of scale as well as the depth of the windows in the framing timbers.

I decided to back the brass frames with clear celluloid and then with 1 mm stock which I painted light grey with a shade of pale yellow it give the impression of candle light.

It certainly is not everything I wanted it to be, but I feel it is a little more customized. Here are a few images, note there is trim needed on the ends of the frames, that is for tomorrow.

DB

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Progress has been slow, and will probably continue that way. I have started on the deck furniture. I am having issues with being accurate as I cut stock for the frames for the pin rails. The miter box I have is plastic and the razor saw gets hung up often, but I am learning to be much more gentle with my cutting and it seems to be getting better. I am fortunate to have a friend who is a luthier and gave me some 4 x 4 mm and 2 x 4 mm walnut to help with my wastage. The other builds on this site are very helpful and I am getting lots of help from the posted pictures.

 

I am now considering whether to blacken some of the brass or not. The rudder strapping and anchor chains seem to be out of place on a painted hull if they are brass. Most of the deck fitting are fine as brass. Any opinions?

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I think the colour you have chosen for your windows is just fine. It will look like they are covered with frost, which is appropriate considering what this vessel was doing. 

 

If you want my opinion, I think you should blacken at least the metal reenforcing straps and gudgeons on the rudder and sternpost. In real life these were cast iron and would have been a black colour. I have blackened all the brass parts on my model for the same reason, but as you say they might look nice brass for some parts. I myself prefer all the metal to be black. Except the bell of course. That would have been nice and shiny.

 

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What the other keith said regards blacking the brass, as it will tend to develop green verdegris and end up nearly black after a few years anyways if not treated properly. Also natural brass effect would look better if leaving the wood just varnished. 

 

Keith

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Evening All,

Thank you for the comments on blackening brass. I tried a couple of approaches to do the job with limited success. I soaked the parts in acetone to get off any lacquer of grease washed them, then put the parts in "Birchwood Casey Brass Black" they immediately turned black. After about 10 minutes I put them on paper towels to dry. Well the black comes off easily, but leaves the brass a gunmetal blue. Pictures below.

 

The plan is to still blacken the iron under the water line and leave the deck brass in it's original colour, with the exception of the anchor chain. So the black flat paint will have to do. I did read the articles on blackening, the effort needed does not seem worth it to me.

 

The shipyard has acquired a dremel drill press accessory, which might help me drill a vertical hole as long as I get the part horizontal in the vice. The leaning curve is still on the up hill side!

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17 minutes ago, broden said:

Thank you for the comments on blackening brass. I tried a couple of approaches to do the job with limited success. I soaked the parts in acetone to get off any lacquer of grease washed them, then put the parts in "Birchwood Casey Brass Black" they immediately turned black. After about 10 minutes I put them on paper towels to dry. Well the black comes off easily, but leaves the brass a gunmetal blue. Pictures below.

 

Broden, I have experienced similar difficulty learning how to blacken the exact parts you are working on now. For me, I cleaned the metal with the exact Dremel setup you have with a spinning wire brush, then right into the chemical bath. Once the metal turned black (a couple of minutes), I then moved into a water bath to stop the chemical reaction. After a little rinse, I placed on a paper towel to dry. Once dry, I lightly brushed off the "powder" on the metal, leaving a black finish. So far, working well.

 

By the way, nice job on your Terror.

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19 hours ago, broden said:

Evening All,

Thank you for the comments on blackening brass. I tried a couple of approaches to do the job with limited success. I soaked the parts in acetone to get off any lacquer of grease washed them, then put the parts in "Birchwood Casey Brass Black" they immediately turned black. After about 10 minutes I put them on paper towels to dry. Well the black comes off easily, but leaves the brass a gunmetal blue. Pictures below.

 

The plan is to still blacken the iron under the water line and leave the deck brass in it's original colour, with the exception of the anchor chain. So the black flat paint will have to do. I did read the articles on blackening, the effort needed does not seem worth it to me.

 

The shipyard has acquired a dremel drill press accessory, which might help me drill a vertical hole as long as I get the part horizontal in the vice. The leaning curve is still on the up hill side!

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Ohh you have a good hardware to job, i'm jealous!! 😲🤣🤣

 

i like the metal finish yo've reached, very rich. I applied vernish and later black chalk paint, when brush it some parts are clean (not bright due to the vernish) an other part in black, for me it's enough

 

I'm working at this moment in the new life boats and i must to retake all deck hardware, but i've no time...

 

good work, regards!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks for the views and comments.

 

One thing that gave a lot of trouble while working on the stern and rudder was the rivet heads.  Being a first time builder cutting the pins supplied by Occre led to many bits of pin launched into space by the cutting pliers, too short to hold and fit into the holes in the brass pinions.

So i worked out a couple of processes that may help the next newbie.

First bend and fit the brass bits to the rudder and hull. Glue them in place, not an easy task for me.

Then drill the holes. I used an awl first then a drill bit in a pin vice. You do not need to drill too deep just enough to get the pin head in place.

 

Cut the pins while wrapping the pliers in a bit of paper towel. Wrapping your bare hand around the cutting process is much less effective and I had a couple of pins stuck in my palm. The paper towel really helps.

I used curved forceps to handle the pin heads after cutting.

I dipped each pin head in a drop of CA glue then placed it in the hole drilled in the brass straps and pushed it home.

Hopefully to stay put until dry.

 

That is the method I am using. I do not know if it is the best, but it is working for me.

 

Dennis

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Merry Christmas All.

 

We in Quebec, Canada are starting our second lock down today. It is supposed to 18 days, but I think it will go much longer. What a mess.

 

Back to the isolated world of building HMS Terror. I have questions, lots of questions. First are these images in the instructions suggesting two possible layouts of the sheathing for the bow or is one just wrong?222232876_IMG_0574Edited.thumb.jpg.855d7f9351efae1b90614374bba83244.jpg

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I could not figure out how to add more text to the post above, so I'm adding in a second post.

 

The supplied material for the plating seems a bit thick and stiff, but the suggested contact cement method might work if done plate by plate. I decided to try a thinner aluminum, so I am cutting up a soda can. It is thinner, but still some what stiff, but bends much more easily. Picture below and comments welcomed.

 

Happy Holidays and stay safe.

 

Dennis

 

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belated merry christmas broden, i used self adhesive copper strip to replace the aluminium. the instructions look slightly different because the two shots are taken from slightly different angles. If using the aluminium sheets just polish them with very fine sandpaper/ emery cloth before gluing/ painting as the metal develops a film which stops paint and glue adhering properly.

 

Keith

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On 12/25/2020 at 3:42 PM, broden said:

I could not figure out how to add more text to the post above, so I'm adding in a second post.

 

The supplied material for the plating seems a bit thick and stiff, but the suggested contact cement method might work if done plate by plate. I decided to try a thinner aluminum, so I am cutting up a soda can. It is thinner, but still some what stiff, but bends much more easily. Picture below and comments welcomed.

 

Happy Holidays and stay safe.

 

Dennis

 

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ohhh the metal plating for the bow! in my model i used the supplied plates, but the result was "chunky", very difficult for me to adjust the metal to the wood, additionally the wood must to be perfect to avoid bumps in the metal... so the final result was not very good 🙄😇😇  

 

if the metal plank is thin try to adjust all possible before glue it to the hull, because with the later sanding maybe you lost some part of it, and you'll need to replace some plank (and more sanding later).

 

finally the paint in "weathering fashion" like my model, maybe it's not a good result, check my pictures; if you like it, it's very simple, more sanding after black painting and the metal planking will reveal the bumps

 

regards!!

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  • 1 month later...

The bow plating is finally all in place. I tried 3 types of glue. White PVA, contact cement and CA (instant glue). The most difficult to use was the contact glue. You get one shot at placing the part, but it sticks well. By the way the local product is by Lepage and is a low odour contact cement. I used CA for the very narrow bits and for any corners that decided to stick up. I am a bit concerned that the PVA that I used in a few places may not last, but we will see. I used my own aluminum cut from soda cans it was easy to shape and bend.

 

Below are  pics of the bow painted and before paint. " A little paste and paint a model builder makes"

 

I am very glad to finish that bit of the build. Now on to the deck furniture.

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Next. I worked hard to get a deck and planking just the way I wanted it to be. Now according to the plans I have to drill holes in it to put in “Lights” or portholes, actually 32 of them. 1284903034_IMG_0598Edited.thumb.jpg.55ebc8458c7d251f28afb0f5396d131f.jpg

One of the Keiths, and I apologize, it was a while ago I do not remember which one filled the little lights with hot melt glue to simulate glass.

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I do not know if all admiralty ships had lights in the main deck or if it was a modification to Terror and Erebus for their exploration missions, but they are in all the builds I see on this site.

Hot glue is a pain. I know may crafters live by the stuff, “she who must be obeyed”  among them. The dammed stuff won’t let go and there are fine strings of glue everywhere. It runs when you do not want it to run and freezes instantly to any cool surface. It burns badly if you get clumsy.

Doing 32 of these tiny tubes individually would take forever, so a jig is in order. Six at once seems reasonable. 

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Add hot melt as cleanly as possible,

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Re-heat with nifty heat gun so the the glue sinks into the brass fitting, let cool then on to the next six.

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When all is said and done and any visitor looks at this model they will probably not notice the lights or even if they have simulated glass in them, but I will know.

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9 hours ago, clearway said:

Hi Broden , they are actually "skylights" to let light in below decks. The two marked just behind the forward hatch are actually elm tree pumps positions as opposed to skylights.

 

Keith

Thanks Keith. I keep assuming that the drawings in the kit are clear. A newbie assumption.

 

Dennis

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hi Broden, nice pictures! i'm happy seeing your progress. About the glass in the light holes, i used a simple wood glue (white colour you know), one drop and when it's dry it's transparent (more than transparent, translucent), very easy to use and if you want you can retire it using a pin with no residues. Keep pushing the Terror!! 😄

 

unfortunately my Terror is waiting for me, very busy at job; but at least five minuts to see your pictures and Clearway's pictures! 😅

 

regards and take care, 

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  • 4 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Good Day,

 

I invested in a pair 10 spoke helm wheel kits to replace the castings supplied with model kit. I am impressed with the content and quality of the ship's helm kit supplied by Syrenshipmodel company. The instructions in the form of a .PDF file on the website are well illustrated and very clear. The parts are fragile and very small and are an exercise in using tweeters, tooth picks and steady hands, but fun to do. The supplier is generous with the parts in an effort to support those of us who may break a few.   

The first image is the first sub assembly with the assembly jig, the second is the a full kit contents. I am about to start trying to shape the spokes. I am sure they will be a challenge.

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