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Make the entire masts or let it cut in a half?


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I saw some models in naval museums and some others of particulars. Some ships caught my attention due to the lack of the upper part of the masts and the rigging. Instead of this only was the lower part and some ratlines with the main stays to the bowsprit. 

 

I thought it was very cool and very useful in small homes like mine because sometimes if it's a big ship adding the full rigging can double the size 😳

 

Tell me your opinion about this. In thinking about applying it to my uss constitution. 

Screenshot_20200914_001812.jpg

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Interesting photo, while I've seen models with only the lower masts in place I don't remember seeing a model also showing the topmasts housed.

 

With or without the topmasts, I think this is an excellent way to show off a ship without the distraction of the masts and rigging and not an unnatural look for a ship, I believe it was standard practice to strike the topgallants and topmasts  when a ship was 'in ordinary' and would certainly happen for maintenance. If you go for the maintenance look you have the opportunity to leave a few tools and materials laying around the deck and maybe a spar on horses being shaped to give it a bit of life.

 

Mark

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What a nice looking model. I think that style captures enough of the essence of the ship while saving a ton of floor space  Same idea as models I have seen that are only built as half models in a longitudinal direction and then mounted on a wall like a 3D picture. 
Tom

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Hi Nikolai

 

When I built a Victory cross-section I decided to cut the main mast off just above the upper deck, partly to save space, but also because I just felt the fully rigged cross section looked unbalanced - too top heavy:

 

XS.jpg.0c3b5a0cce690366263ed93f58ccc426.jpg 

 

Cutting the mast short, I was able to display the model in a modified picture frame:

 

Victory_0045_edited-1.thumb.jpg.fbcaa46868940c6baf7cf6dea7b2762c.jpg

 

 As the others say, go with what works for you.

 

Derek

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I'm a fan of stump masts or even hull only, and it's something I've adopted as space has become an issue.

 I used it on my Cheerful cutter build, and it struck me the first time I saw it that Chris Watton's most recent offering of the Royal yacht would also look good as hull only or stump masts; an approach I would take were I ever to build it.

 

When I built my Heller Victory I also displayed her with Topmasts struck as a space saving option, but still allowed the lower standing rigging to be in place.

 

Love the effect you have achieved with your Victory cross section Derek, great idea.

 

B.E.

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Nikolay there is so much going on in that museum model you show that the lack of full rigging does not at all detratct. It becomes a study of the ship's aritecture. In a recent visit to the NE Ship Modeler Conference in Conneticutt I recall a clipper that was displayed that did not have near the detail of your depicted model that was without any rigging. It's beauty was in its fine detail and workmanship.

Joe

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How strange it is that many modellers don't think a ship is complete without a flag!

My humble opinion is that an honest model is just that. Mounted models will always look a bit odd with a set of sails and flags flying. The only truly realistic depiction of a ship is to be set on the water, configured with a plausible arrangement of sails, flags AND crew.

I do however accept not everyone will agree; ultimately each of us has the right to build and present their own creation as they see fit. Long may that continue.

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As you as k for opinions; here is mine. I don't like the way it has been done with the museum model. It looks to me as whether the builder couldn't be bothered to finish the model (a well known stage at the end of a build😀). If it is without masts then I would cut them off near the deck. That will take away the rigging, which in itself I find a problem for anything before 1750ish as it is such an important part of how you view the ship.

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Wow I've read all the replies. Thanks for your advise. Models without masts look amazing too but I love how the lower ratlines look. I'll defo apply this technique to my Constitution model and bigger ships I've planned to do. Maybe in smaller ones I'll let the entire masts and rigging. Thanks! 

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It really depends on the intent of your model.  Some build to display and focus on the hull and its architecture, hence you get half hull, admiralty models, cut-aways, and cross sections.  Masts and rigging can be seen as a distraction from that.

Others focus on telling something about the distinctions and defining characteristics of the rig.  Still others wish to display a realistic setting with sails, flags, crew or in dioramas.

 

If you are building just for your own enjoyment then anything goes.  You do you.

 

Regards,

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