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HMS Winchelsea by jfhealy - Fred's W2


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I have made so many mistakes on my Winchelsea - not big ones for the most part; but nevertheless leaving me thinking "I could/should have done better" – that I am going to start a new build. I don't aspire to match the standards of Chuck or Mike and others but I do hope to improve. 

 

For the first build ("W1") I took Chuck at his word as to the cost of buying the Syren bulkhead pack – well over £200 here in the UK with shipping and import duty – against buying a scroll saw and a sheet of plywood so the cost of starting again is pretty modest.

 

I will build W2 to the end of chapter 3 and then decide whether I am making a worthwhile improvement. I shall be disappointed if I don't give in all I have learned reading all the logs and from building W1. If I don't see a worthwhile improvement by the end of chapter 3 I may give up on W2. If I can see an improvement I will carry on building W1 ahead of W2 hopefully making all the mistakes on W1 and channelling all the learning and experience into W2. That's the plan.

 

I bought a Proxxon scroll saw for W1 and that seems to work pretty well. I bought some Baltic birch plywood for W1 which was a tough sand. I have used the same plywood for the bulkhead former for W2 but bought some plywood-lite for the bulkheads which I hope will be much easier to sand. I had no idea when starting W1 that there were different grades of plywood.

 

I have also purchased for W2 a Hobby Zone building slip. It's a handy bit of kit, up to a point, but could, I think, have been much better than it is. I would have preferred, for example, a polycarbonate or plastic base with an etched grid and the slide along gantry bit (which you assemble yourself) and which should be really helpful in squaring up the bulkheads is ever so slightly out of true – 90° on one side and about 88° or so on the other. That may well be down to incompetent assembly on my part but it surely would not have cost very much to include a pre--assembled plastic component.

 

Here are some pictures.

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I know the feeling jfhealy as I have not even attempted my Winchelsea until I have completed Cheerful. I made so many minor mistakes on Cheerful, only to rip them off and start again.

 

This passion we all have has been a pursuit of perfection and frustration given so many references on MSW of incredibly fine work.  I find in most anything I do the second time is the charm. For many reasons it seems to be so. So starting anew I am sure you will find it that way until you reach a new chapter and then it seems to start once again. The frustration that is. So for me I now do a practice run on a mock up or in your case maybe W1.

 

Nonetheless with your determination and persistence I think you will get there.

 

Joe 

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Thanks chaps. Joe, I entirely agree with you. I can't shake off the "could do it better second time round feeling" and the Wnchelsea is such a super project it warrants another go.

 

The Proxxon seems a really good bit of kit not that I have anything to compare it to. I have found the second set of bulkheads much easier to cut more accurately than the first. I think that is a combination of little more experience with the saw and using Plywood lite. I'm much more confident of a good outcome than I was at the equivalent stage with W1 but time will tell.

 

All the best everyone

Fred 

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  • 1 month later...

One of the problems with cutting your own bulkheads is, inevitably, and no matter how much care you take, that they will be less accurate then the superb laser cut frames from Syren.

I had real problems with the stern frames on W1. Here, I am trying a different route. The vertical board at the back may look a bit low tech but it is there to position the frames accurately one to the other and at the correct angle. There is a 1mm sliver of wood behind the outer frames to give the transom some curvature.

IMG_20201002_154229510.jpg

IMG_20201002_154329915.jpg

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W2 was supposed to eliminate the errors I made on W1 not introduce new ones I didn't make first time round. Still, the repair was pretty straightforward. I cut out the fillers with the razor saw, glued a 1mm strip on either side to replace the  saw cut and glued them back in. They have not come out badly at all. Here two are done.

IMG_20201008_172941725~2.jpg

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On W1 the frames were out side to side and I used a bucket full of of car body filler to get things straight. I can see now,looking at all the other super logs, that that's for chumps. This is looking much better. I've added frames bf3 and bf4 however.

The yellow tape follows the marks on the plan exactly and looks pretty good without any tweaking.

IMG_20201022_064120804.jpg

IMG_20201022_064315800.jpg

IMG_20201022_064136275.jpg

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Hi Fred, she’s coming along nicely, looks really crisp and clean. However I have to say thanks, I’m reading this as I’m having my morning coffee and down stairs I run in a panic to check my transom fillers!  Little late in the game but got me wondering. Lol
 

Honestly I’m not quite sure how to post a photo and type underneath it... I just tried what I thought would work and no go.

 

JJ

 

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I like the look of the repair.  Wood is so forgiving it is nice to be able to quickly repair/fix errors

 

3 hours ago, jfhealey said:

Finally can someone please tell me how, having uploaded a picture, you can continue text. I can't figure it out.

All the best everyone.

Fred


after I attach the picture in the log the courser will be at the right side edge of the picture but will not be blinking like it does as you type.   I always just hit the return button a time or two and it shows up under the picture again and can then type as normal

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Looking good and great recovery.  Adding extra bow fillers is a great idea.

 

Regarding pictures, I found that before I start doing anything in the post, hit enter about 10 times then you can just drag the pictures wherever you want and there a space for typing before and after each one.

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13 hours ago, jfhealey said:

W2 was supposed to eliminate the errors I made on W1 not introduce new ones I didn't make first time round.

 

You're doing a good job Fred. Unfortunately we continue to bump our heads as we move along. The key is to find the errors (as you have done)

and correct them before they cause further problems. I continuously have to check, recheck and then check some more!  :) 

 

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  • 3 months later...

P1000065.thumb.JPG.cd30fcae05c5a21069b5ed276d06b52c.JPGP1000081.thumb.JPG.e0fd6d5772dc65376d5076334a9b3a08.JPGThe sheer on W1 didn't turn out well at all. I guess I miscut the bulkheads. I ended up with an unacceptable bulge just in front of the hance piece. The pictures above are W1.

It looks worse in reality than in the photo and was a significant factor in my decision to begin W2. The picture below is W2. The sheer is absolutely flat – which is much better than W1 but not correct. The plans show a slight upward curve towards the bollard timbers. I had not twigged the relationship between the sheer and the wales. I think if I were to build W3 (aaargh!....... see below) I would put a temporary capping piece along the sheer and crosscheck the run of the wales before fixing anything.

P1000080.thumb.JPG.2ccfc61a0ab61e6f20c3323efb18e2aa.JPG

 

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I am not convinced by the run off the planking. I wish I had lined the hull just as Ben (Trussben) has done. It looks okay on the side viewed head-on the planks  curve upwards uattractively.

 

P1000061.thumb.JPG.c8ac7b8c7f6436aced7890ce10c498e5.JPG245847401_P1000044(1).thumb.JPG.6a934f837f77c11dc7eeccdc54b92bef.JPG

I took a lot of care with the gunports which were untidy on W1 but I am sure there is a  far better way of doing it than working by eye. Still, they are not too bad. 

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Here are W1 and W2 together

1947751747_P1000062(2).thumb.JPG.eac41be34cbd9923b5083477ae4fc7f9.JPG

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This was a disaster area on W1. It  has come out much better on W2

464907592_P1000059(2).thumb.JPG.3871ad389a50b66216074f9c8ae4478e.JPGP1000060.thumb.JPG.072efc49f5fb11510b66de55114018be.JPG

You can see I sanded the profile of the lowest plank of the lower counter incorrectly and had  to make good with a little wood filler – but that will be covered by the frieze in due course.

 

Thank you JJ for your thoughts about how to tackle this tricky area.

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I did not put in the piece that attaches to the bottom of the stern frames and provides a glueing surface for the planks. I found it easier to heat bend the corkscrew curve into the planks so that they fitted without any pressure and then just cut a bevel before gluing to the lower counter. On W1 this area cost me several layers of skin off my fingertips struggling to get pieces to stay where I wanted them to go while the CA did its best. 

P1000077 (1).JPG

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