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Hi,

 

Can you give me recommandation for PE soldering. O have to purchase a soldering station that will be used almost exclusively for PE soldering. Not a cheap one, but not the most Weller expense too.

 

Thanks you,

 

Michel

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Oh! Good new, good stuff at a good price. I will take a look for it. There is a lot of choice on amazon, but a lot of chinese material too.

 

And did you purchased complementary tips with it ? Is large flat tip can be useful for some small planking area ?

 

Thank you 

 

Michel

 

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Michael, I have found that a resistance soldering unit has given me the best control of the heat for use with even the thinnest PE - not cheap though and probably outside the price range you have indicated.  May be worth your while having a look at one though?  I use an American Beauty (Chief) model - no association, just a happy customer.  These are popular with the model railroading community, whom use a lot of PE.

 

If Kurt's suggestion works  and is in your budget, that may be your best bet.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I just have the original tip for the Weller unit.  Works fine for me but the tips are inexpensive so give others a try. 

I have a resistance soldering unit as well as the Smith Little Torch so I use what's best for the job at hand.  I had not even considered using the resistance soldering unit on PE before reading Pat's post.  I do find that I am using the resistance soldering unit more and the torch less. 

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Sometimes one can find second-hand resistance soldering units meant for watchmakers or jewellers. Watchmakers solder the 'feet' if watch-faces to them - very delicate parts. One may need to modify the work-holding arrangements, as these units are laid out for specific tasks. Has been on my shopping list for a long time ...

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Hi Michel,  I would stay away from lead solder but your call.  I tend to use silver solder for most projects but slightly overkill for some items where holding strength is not necessary.

 

I use nokorode flux (no connections)  as it is easier to control and no clean-up after using it :) - and I also find it works well with silver solder.  I prefer using three differing melting point solders so that if there are multiple soldering points or steps, I can get better control by using the highest first then work down.  Even with the best heat sink setup, on very small parts this is sometimes necessary.

 

If you prefer soft solder as I said, I would try to stay from lead (not even sure we can get that here anymore), and my preference is also to stay away from rosin core solders, and solder paste,  as I have had poor results  (except for copper solder paste).

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks Pat, it is interesting to read different opinion. I was aware about lead and the new stuff with no lead content. So, should I buy thin/copper/silver wire ? Is the proportion of content of each, except for melting temperature point, important for quality of the finition on PE ? 

 

Oh I forget : lots of no lead solder wire contain rosin in core, I do not know if this fit your recommandation.

 

Thanks,

 

Michel

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If you plan on soldering in electrical situations, you should use a rosin flux. Acid flux will affect the electrical work. Flux is the last step in cleaning your parts before soldering them.

 

I suspect your usage won't be in electrical use, so acid fluxes should be OK. Make sure you clean off the acid flux very thoroughly after your soldering is complete.

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Hi Michel, as Canute says, the need drives the solution.  Sorry, I made the mistake of assuming it was for our hobby only where there is little need for electrical consideration, unless adding LEDS.

 

WRT the type of solder, I predominantly use the wire types but it depends on what you can get.  I can take small flakes/bits off the wire where I simply need a pellet/flake but then retain the benefits of wire for larger jobs.  You can also get small sheets from which to cut pellets.  Temperature is my main driver but where I need a lot of holding power (like in the winches I made (1:72) to which the wire ropes will be attached and tensioned, I also look at the silver content. 

 

I hope that helps?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I have been soldering all sorts of things for at least 60 years. The most challenging work has been hand soldering surface mount ICs with pin spacing of 0.5 mm (0.02 inch) or less without getting solder bridges between pins. I also solder tiny parts for models, such as photo etch.

 

I have found liquid fluxes to be superior to paste because they flow readily between surfaces. I paint them on the joint to be soldered with a small brush. Only enough to flow into the gap is needed. When hot solder hits the flux it evaporates and the solder follows it into the gaps.

 

I like the citric acid based fluxes because they are water soluble and wash off easily with no residue. And they smell like orange juice! They are used on electrical equipment such as ICs, wiring, circuit boards, etc. But they work just as well with photo etch.

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I did not fond all the materials proposed, so , finally, I purchased these soldering Materials :

  • Hakko FS-100 Tip Cleaner ;
  • Canfield solid wire 60/40 (no core). I will cut chip or or make flake with cutter ;
  • MG Chemicals Rosin Paste Flux .

Thanks for everyone who have contributed in this thread.

 

Michel

Canfield Solid wire 60-40.jpg

FS-100 Hakko.jpg

MG Chemicals Paste.jpg

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