Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I've been looking at historical precedents on the Zulu, and I'm considering painting the topsides above the boot stripe black.  This seems to be the nearly ubiquitous color scheme, almost universally indicative of the type.  Here's a few photos I've found:

 

IMG_1041.jpg

IMG_1040.JPG

IMG_1039.JPG

 

So I think I'm going to try to make her look like this.  Will need to do a bit more research to see where the paint actually should stop at the top of the bulwarks.  Also need to decide what paint to use... the images of Zulus I've seen suggest a flat or satin finish.  I'll be doing a white boot stripe, and the red oxide bottom paint as shown in the photos provided by Chris and James.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, chris watton said:

I so wanted to paint the topsides of my prototype model black, as it should be...

 

The boat certainly looks beautiful with the bright wood topsides, and it shows off the lovely pear planking.  But the black is certainly more typical of the type.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Planking has always been one of my favorite parts! I have heard people say things like I can’t wait to be done with this or build like it’s a job, and that is always disappointing to see because this process is supposed to be fun and relaxing, so I’m glad your enjoying it! Keep up the great work!

 

Bradley 

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Keithbrad80 said:

 

Planking has always been one of my favorite parts! I have heard people say things like I can’t wait to be done with this or build like it’s a job, and that is always disappointing to see because this process is supposed to be fun and relaxing, so I’m glad your enjoying it! Keep up the great work!

 

Bradley 


I’ve always found that with most things in life that are truly worthwhile, it’s as much about the journey as it is the destination. :)

 

Thanks Bradley!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Your planking looks very good Eric, and will provide an excellent base for the Pearwood.

 

One piece of advice I would offer is to ensure that on completion of the first planking you fine down the plank ends at the bow and stern to be flush or even slightly below the stem and stern posts. It is useful to use the Pearwood stem and stern patterns temporarily in place to check progress, and see how the pearwood planking will fit.

 

It is much easier to sand the limewood than the Pearwood,  and the object is to avoid at all costs a ridge running down the  stem and stern lines.

 

Regards,

 

B.E.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much, BE.  I so appreciate the advice.  Understood...I was thinking that when the first planking is complete, I’d do a final trim of the planks against the posts with a razor blade, and then sand the plank thickness down with a sanding block in those areas.  
 

Your model of Muirneag is coming along so beautifully... it’s inspiring to me to have a build by an experienced modeler to check in on!  
 

-EKE

Link to post
Share on other sites

First planking is complete!  I’m feeling a little bit proud of myself having groped my way through my first ship planking endeavor. :)  I had to install a few wedge-shaped stealers as the planking approached the garboard, at both bow and stern, as the curvature really changes as you work your way down.  But it all came together pretty well. 

 

5DA79649-8CF9-48D2-AECF-509DFF3903C0.jpeg
 

And here is the hull after an initial sanding.  I started with a stiff foam sanding stick with 120 grit, and moved on to 220 sandpaper.

 

4C7C3C61-3210-42FD-B0BD-4AC3AFAC9A37.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

A few more photos of the sanded hull.  
 

 

E1C64F4E-B16B-42C0-89D5-603C9AE50E0C.jpeg

CEE6B0F2-4AAE-4BCA-95C8-AD88D9421F60.jpeg

8CDEADE0-C829-4C43-9647-D436305920F5.jpeg

F2DD6B63-43D9-40A6-B667-007457F2834F.jpeg
 

I have to say again how pretty I think the shape of the Zulu is, and the planking here really shows it off.  I’m kind of sad I have to cover up this all this work, but again, it’s all about the journey.  The consolation is that, with some luck, it will have another layer that will be even prettier.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

One last detail in this report: At Blue Ensign’s suggestion, I’m taking special care to make sure the first planking at the stem is trimmed down and sanded thin enough to allow the second planking to seat properly in the stem rabbets.  The rabbets are formed by side pieces of pearwood which sandwich the stem, as well as the keel and rudder post.  Those will be added next.  Here I’m checking the fit of one of the stem side pieces.  It seems that I’m in pretty good shape here with the ends of the first planks... perhaps a bit of fine tuning to go.

 

17416D9E-97DC-4188-AE40-E6E7774D539A.jpeg

63F2CA38-EC59-493B-8948-C5EE066A5B70.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

As an aside, during a pause in construction (:)), I have been doing some online research on the Zulu type.  I came across these vintage drawings on the Greenwich Maritime Museum website.  They are design drawings of the Zulu Fidelity (BF1479), launched in 1904.   Beautiful draftsmanship, and it seems to me typical of design documents of the era.  It's interesting to look at the interior elevations in the longitudinal section, and to imagine what the saloon of this boat must have been like.  Also fascinating is the way the mast trunk and step accommodated the lowering and storing of the main mast.  Adjacent to the mast step in the section is a small detail showing the plan of the mast trunk as three sided, and open facing aft, so that the mast can be raked aftward and laid down.  The section also shows the tip of the mast seating down into a pocket in the mast step.  I'm wondering how they would have raised the mast up out of the socket in order to stow it.  Maybe that wasn't necessary...perhaps it was designed to simply rock backwards out of the socket. 

 

The deck plan and the rigging of BF1479 Fidelity shown here are very close to Lady Isabella.  Chris, I'm wondering if these drawings were among your source material for the design? 

 

Fidelity_section.png

Fidelity_lines.png

Fidelity_sailplan.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, EKE said:

First planking is complete!  I’m feeling a little bit proud of myself having groped my way through my first ship planking endeavor.

What a beautiful planking job, Erik, especially for your first time doing it. That's very impressive indeed!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2020 at 12:18 PM, James H said:

Those laser-cut pearwood garboard planks are a nice touch as well, and dead easy to fit for your next layer.

 

Question for you Jim, regarding your technique for the second planking.  You have said you used CA gel to attach the planks, and you described placing spots of CA periodically along the back of the plank, and progressively pressing and holding the plank into position while the gel sets.  What about the edges of the plank?  Are you gluing the edge of the new plank to the edge of the last one? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, EKE said:

 

Question for you Jim, regarding your technique for the second planking.  You have said you used CA gel to attach the planks, and you described placing spots of CA periodically along the back of the plank, and progressively pressing and holding the plank into position while the gel sets.  What about the edges of the plank?  Are you gluing the edge of the new plank to the edge of the last one? 

 

For second plank, I don't edge glue. I can't see the point as the planks won't be moving anywhere. I do bevel the edges of the planks to make them sit as close as possible to the previous.

 

Also, those little gel dots are maybe 2mm apart, roughly, and quite small. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, James H said:

 

For second plank, I don't edge glue. I can't see the point as the planks won't be moving anywhere. I do bevel the edges of the planks to make them sit as close as possible to the previous.

 

Also, those little gel dots are maybe 2mm apart, roughly, and quite small. 

 

Thanks Jim!  Great information.  Are you using a tool to apply the gel, or using the nozzle of the glue bottle to apply?

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, EKE said:

 

Thanks Jim!  Great information.  Are you using a tool to apply the gel, or using the nozzle of the glue bottle to apply?

 

No, I apply straight from a bottle of Gorilla Glue CA gel. It's quite controllable. I love the stuff and it's been a godsend this last 7 months since I've been working for Vanguard.

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Gorilla-4044400-15g-Superglue-Gel/dp/B01KVQKG9C/ref=sr_1_56?dchild=1&keywords=gorilla+glue&qid=1602102905&sr=8-56

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick update:  Been very busy with work this week, but I did install the stem, keel and rudder post facing parts.  They are laser cut pearwood, and sandwich the stem, keel and post creating a nice rabbet to accept the ends of the second planking.  It’s a great detail, I think.  You can’t really screw this up, because Chris had designed it with little flat biscuits which fit into slots laser cut into the facing pieces.  So the correct alignment is ensured.  All this fits together perfectly.  I glued them in with PVA white glue, and clamped them to ensure they were properly laminated to the core pieces.  
 

6145AABC-066F-4B9C-8AA6-EA2D608FBE4B.jpeg
 

Below are a couple of shots after the glue had dried and the clamps were removed.  The facing pieces for the rudder post create sockets that the tongues of the rudder fit into.  In the photo below I’ve tested the rudder’s fit.  Perfecto.   The shape of the rudder is very elegant, and the overall form of the hull is completed beautifully with it in place.  
 

On to the second planking this weekend!
 

 

B8F6D6EC-1C74-4172-9CB7-85B715699FB5.jpeg

023F83F1-3BE2-4426-92C8-27B00A3B5F45.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   2 members

×
×
  • Create New...