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Looking for directions, plans, schematics for modelling primarily locks mortise types for doors or General latches. Would like to construct in styrene first and non-ferrous Metals afterwards.

 

I tried looking at patents but they were all very complicated and I got lost in the level of detail.

 

Then I tried YouTube videos of people restoring mortise locks but I could never get a clear enough you of all of the parts of any particular lock.

 

Lastly, I even tried lockpicking books and sites but they all focus on the actual process of picking locks and never the mortise style just the knobs...LOL

 

In a perfect world I'd like to model working ( functional)

door knobs and locks & window latches of any style

 

Any pioneers or suggestions?

 

 

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On 9/29/2020 at 1:29 PM, druxey said:

You may need to engineer a mechanism to work at that scale; a simplification of a full-sized latch, but with the correct external appearance.

yeah, was hoping to springboard off someone else's idea but it appears that no one has done it b4 or at least they haven't  publicized it.. LOL.

 

I really wish I already knew Fusion.

 

thx!

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Not sure, I understand the problem well. There are three basic types of locks:

 

- the kind of box that is screwed to the inside of a door and the latch runs into a U-shaped part that is screwed to the door-frame - my father used to call this cow-shed lock ;)

- the traditional style, where the box-shaped lock slides into a mortice in the door and is screwed down to the narrow side of the door, for which purpose the box has longer flat piece of metal attached to its narrow side; the latch runs into mortice in the frame that is re-enforced with a metal plate

- the zylindrical security locks that a set into a bore of the door and the latch runs again into a mortice in the door frame.

 

So what do you actually want to model ? The whole lock with its mechanism ?

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23 hours ago, wefalck said:

Not sure, I understand the problem well. There are three basic types of locks:

 

- the kind of box that is screwed to the inside of a door and the latch runs into a U-shaped part that is screwed to the door-frame - my father used to call this cow-shed lock ;)

- the traditional style, where the box-shaped lock slides into a mortice in the door and is screwed down to the narrow side of the door, for which purpose the box has longer flat piece of metal attached to its narrow side; the latch runs into mortice in the frame that is re-enforced with a metal plate

- the zylindrical security locks that a set into a bore of the door and the latch runs again into a mortice in the door frame.

 

So what do you actually want to model ? The whole lock with its mechanism ?

I'm thinking that the best option is to make it as a full mortise lock; yes the vintage ones where the whole device slides into the slim side of the door and inc the mechanism for the handle as well.  

Some of those are rim locks - where the lock itself slides into the box or the door knob itself but i think that's just too far...

 

I'd just have a single lever mechanism for the knob and put the keyhole beside the knob but still inside the same box/case.  The key won't really be 'keyed but the lock should lock when the key is rotated manually.

 

I've got a few patent drawings but they are WAY more complicated than what I want bit it's harder than I thought to simplify since some of the bits do multiple things within the case.

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Actually, the good old door locks, whether set into a mortice or screwed to the inside of the door are not too complicated. I found an image on the German Wikipedia that shows the inards (and the one or two locks that I took apart looked very similar indeed):

 

L-Schloss2.png

 

The square hole on the top is the one for the door knob or handle. C is the template for the key - in this kind of lock the bolt can be moved with any hook that fits through the template, i.e. they are easy to pick. The key is inserted with the nose down, when you turn it up, it moved the notched bolt to the right and lifts it against the spring (b) loaded latch. You can turn the key twice, moving the bolt deeper into the mortice in the door-frame. The manual bolt (d) is not normally available in locks fitted into the door.

For a lock terminology have a look here: https://www.timpsonlocksmiths.co.uk/locksmith-terminology/

 

I don't think it would be too difficult to reproduce a simple working lock as per above sketch in 1/12 scale. It would be probably about 12 mm high, 10 mm wide and 3 mm thick. The body would be two plates held apart by studs. You may probably get away without the springs, or make a simplified arrangement.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here you go a simple little mortise lock that could be made from styrene and or brass overall dimensions are .378" wide .5" high .125" thick

 

 

lock.jpg.54ba4267790df2870fa9bb9a955e7c2f.jpg

 

This lock has no springs and is showing the basic design principles I have made locks using this basic design for a small box I have the drawing in Autocad 2000 and corel draw 11

 

There is a slot for the handle which is the blue bar at the top. the key is the old cabinet type that slides over a pin so the end with the tube is hollow.

 

the jpeg is full size

 

Michael

 

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