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Looking for photos of homemade micro woodcarving gouges

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I'm trying to make some relief woodcarving for a model at 1:64 scale. For this scale even the smallest Dockyard gouges (1.5 mm) are rather large. The only really small gouge I have found is a 0.5 mm Pfeil V-gouge.

As I remember, in MSW 1.0 had been posted photos of homemade micro woodcarving gouges made from hypodermic needles etc. 

Has anybody such photos ?

 

Thanks,

Kostas

 

 

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That's brilliant, Bob! I hadn't seen that tutorial before. Many thanks!

 

Tony

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Bob thank you very much for your great tutorial.

 

Janos your photos are very helpful.

I'm admiring your amazing work on Royal Caroline. It's very inspiring for me.

 

Thank you all

Kostas

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I'm just using jewellers gravers, they come in a variety of shapes and are very good for fine work. They are however, quite expensive.The ones I bought were $30 each. The up- side is you can use them on metal as well, which is handy for those irritating bits on metal castings. Another benefit is that i'll probably never have to get any more, they last a lifetime.

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Thank you Mathew for your help. I hadn't thought to look in jewellery supplies.

I made some search and I found that these gravers are available in really very small sizes (from 0.2 mm).

 

Thank you

Kostas

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Janos I thank you once more for your help.

I'm using too rotary diamond bits (ball head, cone head & cylindrical) with my Proxxon IB/E and a flexishaft and several Pfeil gauges. 

Your photos will help me to add some homemade hand tools to my collection. 

I hope that a combinated use of the above and of some jeweller's needle files will cover my needs.

 

Thanks

Kostas

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I'm with both Bob and Janos -- Bob's tutorial has advice I've been looking for a long time.  And meanwhile, I've learned about Janos' point that a rotary tool with micro burrs can do quite a bit (at LOW speed).

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi I've been trying to make some micro gouges--less than 0.5 mm and have been partially successful using hypodermic needles.  I was very excited to find this group--and I see that Bob had posted a tutorial.  The link doesn't seem to work.  Is there a way to fix the link?

 

Thanks,

Fran

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Hi -- what am I doing wrong? When I click on the link to the tutorial in Bob's post, i get a message that says "bad request."

Thanks,

Fran

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Hi -- what am I doing wrong? When I click on the link to the tutorial in Bob's post, i get a message that says "bad request."

Thanks,

Fran

Fran

It worked fine for me. Came up as a pdf file and opened with Adobe Reader. If you can't get it then let me know and I can sent it to you by PM.

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I'm with both Bob and Janos -- Bob's tutorial has advice I've been looking for a long time.  And meanwhile, I've learned about Janos' point that a rotary tool with micro burrs can do quite a bit (at LOW speed).

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

Hi Martin

 

I have thought much about Wood carving decoration and have a Dremel motortool which to date is mostly used for grinding, What rounds-speed i.e. do you suggest when considering lowspeed ?

 

Also thanks to all the others for sharing their experience on this thread.

 

Cheers

 

Nils

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On the subject of tempering: some time ago I bought an electrical hot-air soldering gun; the airflow temperature can be set from 100°C to 450°C; I found this very useful for tempering not too big metal parts as there is no risk of overheating.

 

wefalck

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Hi Kostas,

 

do you have some examples (pics) of your carvings in 1:64 for this Topic. I never tried it myself allthough I wish I could do such as well, but I trust it takes a natural Talent to do carvings in wood and I allways thought scale 1:64 would not allow such fine working

 

Nils

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Hi --

I was trying to make a small carving gouge (I work on dollhouse miniatures) and read this thread with interest. After reading all the tutorials out there I could find, and talking to my turning friends, I spent some time experimenting on making gouges.  In case anyone is interest, I ended up making a small gouge---about 0.3 mm wide, with a deep U shape (#11 sweep).  I put together a tutorial on my blog.  

http://somesmall.wordpress.com/category/making-tools/

 

Thanks for the thread!
Fran

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I've used a masonry nail for the metal stock, mounted in a piece of dowel for a handle, and with the end ground down (safety specs on) with a Proxxon at a slowish speed and dipping into water regularly to prevent heating and loss of temper.  These nails are very hard steel and hold an edge beautifully. They come in different sizes with a box not costing a lot.

 

Cheers

 

Al

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I made a couple from sewing machine needles. I used a dremel cut off wheel and worked it by hand to keep the needle cool so not to change the temper. I shaped the cut off wheel with the small diamond stick and made u shaped gouges. The needle already has the groove in it for the thread so it didn't take much to form it. They held up better than the hypodermic needles did.   Doug J

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Hi Martin

 

I have thought much about Wood carving decoration and have a Dremel motortool which to date is mostly used for grinding, What rounds-speed i.e. do you suggest when considering lowspeed ?

 

Also thanks to all the others for sharing their experience on this thread.

 

Cheers

 

Nils

 

Hi Nils -- Sorry I haven't responded to your question.  I used a Dremel set at the lowest speed, and with a flex-shaft attachment (the handle part is fairly comfortable, light, and easy to maneuver).  I got my micro-burrs from Livesay's, which has a very large selection.  That's the set-up I used for the carvings on the stern & head of my Rattlesnake.  As I've been working intermittently on the stern carving of the Fly, I've started off by doing a mockup in modelling clay, just so I could see how the figures should look, and so I could work out any problems before they led to errors on the wood.

 

Non-power tools are still a must, however.  Along with an opti-visor and good lighting. 

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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I rarely use miniature gauges in comparison with the small rotary ones... for a simple reason: 

rotary ones are much more precise at a level that small gauges will never be able to compare

because they are more difficult to control than rotary bitts.

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